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Old 11-16-2011, 05:27 PM
  #31  
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We're looking pretty darn hard. A lot have been looked at and had issues with their tops or worse, rotten floors. Im sure we will have a camper by then but i still will bring a smaller 6-8 person tent if we have to move higher up in the mountains for the elk.
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Old 11-16-2011, 05:35 PM
  #32  
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Muley I am by no means an experienced Elk hunter. I have shot several. But I am not very experienced.

We normally had to go above 11,000 feet to find the elk. It seemed like it was always hot in the early season. And the elk just seemed to be at the higher elevations when we were hunting.

We were not really trophy hunting. And I like what you said about the meat in the freezer. We never wasted an ounce of elk meat.

Even though we were hunting(a couple of times) during the rut, I never really was a person to do any bugling. Although when they are bugling they are prety easy to locate. So we just got as close as we could, then played our chances. Strictly beginner stuff!! Tom.
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Old 11-16-2011, 05:57 PM
  #33  
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I picked up on the 12,000 ft you mentioned. That's above treeline. It's where the big bulls hang out. I'm after a herd that can be found at 10,000-11,000ft, and sometimes lower. They can really be anywhere in Sept. As long as they have all there needs. Food, water, and shelter. I live at 8000ft, and see elk in Sept in my area.

I don't bugle, because it's generally a challenge to the herd bulls. Younger bulls don't come to challenges. My observation anyway. I want the young bull. It comes running to cow calls trying to beat the lead herd bull.

This is how i've done it in the past, because i've been alone. I never wanted to get a full grown bull. Way too hard for me to get the meat out. With Jon's help I may go for a bigger bull this time.

It will be an either sex tag, so a nice tender cow is not out of the question either.
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:03 PM
  #34  
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Muley I am probably exagerating the 12,000 foot just a bit. But not much. I knew tree line was somewhere in that 12,000 foot range. And we hunted in places where you could actually see the tree line. But we were in the trees. So to be truthful we were probably in the 11,500 foot range.

Sometimes I was actually suprised how thick the pine tree forest could be at such a high elevation. The Aspen's were nice and wide open. But some of those Pine thickets were unbelievable!!

Is tree line constant throughout the entire Rockies?? Or does it vary from one area to the next?? Tom.
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:10 PM
  #35  
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It's not exact. Somewhere around 11,300ft.

As a still hunter, I love the timber areas. I'll be there most of the time looking for where they're bedded down. I can hunt all day doing that, and catch them in the open during sunup and sunset.

Some guys just hang around the camp during the day. It's my best time to be hunting. I love the timber. I said that already didn't I? Well, I do.

Last edited by Muley Hunter; 11-16-2011 at 06:12 PM.
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:35 PM
  #36  
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Sleeping Bag.

Tent

Heater.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:12 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by ronlaughlin
Amen Ron, i spend more than a weekend i want heat and a tent i can stand in and at least take a bucket bath lol. i have smaller tents for 1 or 2 day hunts.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:29 PM
  #38  
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Pretty funny Ron. I won't mention the price, but you think all that is going to fit in a Jeep. 12'x 12' for one guy?

I just need a place to sleep. Not live.
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:28 AM
  #39  
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Perhaps i missed something. Seems i read you were going to be camped there for the duration of hunting season. Unless your hunting season is a day or two long, you need a place to 'live'. When i first retired i spent the duration of that hunting season in a wall tent. I was there for 5 weeks, and believe me, i was comfortable. There was room to walk around, hang wet clothes, cook, sit and read, share tales etc. Folks that have never 'lived' in a wall tent, can't imagine how comfortable it can be in the foulest of weather.

Our son now moves and stores his camp in a trailer.
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Old 11-17-2011, 04:01 AM
  #40  
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The Alaskan guide tents are great. I have owned a 6 person for about 15 years and wouldn't trade it for anything. Even though you are going it alone sometimes, I would consider getting the 6 person. You can stand up in that one, something I really like being able to do. I would also get the vestibule, very handy for muddy boots and various other things you want out of the weather, but not in the tent.
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