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Essentials for back country archery elk hunt?

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Essentials for back country archery elk hunt?

Old 12-11-2015, 05:45 PM
  #11  
Typical Buck
 
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If you are packing camp in, and elk and camp out, on your back. Be realistic about how far in you are going. You can figure about 160 lbs of meat off a yearling cow, 200+ off an average cow or bull, and upwards of 260 lbs of meat from a larger bull. That is boned and trimmed. Add the antlers and a cape (if you are going to get it mounted) and it gets heavy fast. Add camp and gear and as stated above, it'll be at least 4 heavy trips by your self. Early season hunts tend to bring warmer weather, so time becomes a factor too. Even if one has the strength and stamina, if you are too many miles back, it is difficult to get the beast out before risk of spoilage.
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Old 12-11-2015, 06:07 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by wyomingtrapper View Post
If you are packing camp in, and elk and camp out, on your back. Be realistic about how far in you are going. You can figure about 160 lbs of meat off a yearling cow, 200+ off an average cow or bull, and upwards of 260 lbs of meat from a larger bull. That is boned and trimmed. Add the antlers and a cape (if you are going to get it mounted) and it gets heavy fast. Add camp and gear and as stated above, it'll be at least 4 heavy trips by your self. Early season hunts tend to bring warmer weather, so time becomes a factor too. Even if one has the strength and stamina, if you are too many miles back, it is difficult to get the beast out before risk of spoilage.
Oh I understand that, the place where my family has elk hunted has been a place my grandfather has hunted over 20 years. I have been up there a few times hiking and when I was to young to actually be able to harvest an elk. It isn't a long trek maybe about a mile or maybe less but there is a significant amount of elevation change. And we have yet to see any people up there during season. (cross my fingers). We also have a creek that runs next to camp. Would it be smart, if I shoot one to, stick the meat in the creek while we back it out? Or would you hang it up?
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Old 12-11-2015, 06:09 PM
  #13  
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One thing I just thought of that I just went to in the last several years is a good LED headlamp. I still have a tiny flashlight or two, but a good headlamp is invaluable to have your hands free while walking. It is also great if you have to process an animal at night so you have both hands free since skinning/gutting/deboning, etc. takes both hands.
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Old 12-12-2015, 01:56 AM
  #14  
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A horse or two.
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Old 12-12-2015, 07:05 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Brandon_SPC View Post
We also have a creek that runs next to camp. Would it be smart, if I shoot one to, stick the meat in the creek while we back it out? Or would you hang it up?
Hang it unless you have it cut up and sealed inside of watertight containers. We cut and trim enough in the field to put all of the meat into big Ziploc bags. Whatever you do get it cooled as fast as you can and keep it clean. Keep those darn insects off of the meat as much as possible.

A saw comes in handy to cut the skull to get the antlers off. A cheap hacksaw will do it. Antlers and a bit of skull weigh a whole lot less than an elk head.
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Old 12-12-2015, 07:33 AM
  #16  
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"We also have a creek that runs next to camp. Would it be smart, if I shoot one to, stick the meat in the creek while we back it out? Or would you hang it up?"

Get the hide off ASAP and then hang the meat in breathable game bags in the shade near the creek where it should be cooler than other areas. We do that and then put the game bag in a garbage bag inside our packs just long enough to keep our packs clean on the way out to the truck. That way the meat is cooling the entire time in the shade and is left in the shade in the game bags at the truck. Generally the meat is fairly cool by the time we get back to camp and it's never put in a cooler until it has cooled off even if we have to cut it into smaller pieces to speed cooling. NEVER put warm meat right into plastic bags, as they hold the heat and it's an easy way to ruin it.
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Old 12-12-2015, 09:08 AM
  #17  
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Just saw this unused Big Agnes tent on another website and it's the Platinum and weighs 1 pound 7 ounces. The price has been lowered from $300+ to $260 and he says he will go no lower. That would be a great tent for you at a very good price, especially since it has never been used! If you want it, send me a PM and I'll put you in touch with the guy. He's a regular on the other site I visit and I can vouch for him.
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Last edited by Topgun 3006; 12-12-2015 at 09:12 AM.
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Old 12-12-2015, 10:41 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by Topgun 3006 View Post
NEVER put warm meat right into plastic bags, as they hold the heat and it's an easy way to ruin it.
I will assume you are writing about large hunks of meat such as full quarters. However, if you are typing that putting meat into a gallon sized Ziploc bag then I will most certainly disagree with you. The bags are small enough to be separated from each other and the meat cools quite well. I know this as I have done this dozens of times, it is not just speculation.

Putting meat into most garbage bags is a bad idea. Most garbage bags are treated to reduce odor. There are some clear recycled bags that are not treated.
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Old 12-12-2015, 11:54 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by Big Uncle View Post
I will assume you are writing about large hunks of meat such as full quarters. However, if you are typing that putting meat into a gallon sized Ziploc bag then I will most certainly disagree with you. The bags are small enough to be separated from each other and the meat cools quite well. I know this as I have done this dozens of times, it is not just speculation.

Putting meat into most garbage bags is a bad idea. Most garbage bags are treated to reduce odor. There are some clear recycled bags that are not treated.
That assumption is correct in that I was talking about bone in quarters or whole boned out quarters that we take out in or on our backpacks, not small stuff like you break it down into. Doing what you do should allow the meat to let the heat out sufficiently such that it's no big deal. We don't break the meat down that small like you do at least until we get to camp and have coolers of ice for it. We also always make sure that the plastic bags we use, even though it's for a fairly short time during our trips to the truck, are not treated with anything that might be transferred to the meat.

Last edited by Topgun 3006; 12-13-2015 at 07:21 AM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 12-15-2015, 01:36 PM
  #20  
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You should also put on the list a handheld GPS, paper map, and compass.
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