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Yukon moose

Old 05-05-2015, 10:32 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by Muley Hunter View Post
That goes for elk too. If only it was possible. The elk don't seem to want to hang out where I park the Jeep.
You would think they would be more polite wouldn't ya!
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Old 05-06-2015, 04:50 AM
  #12  
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Good luck ctiller, your a lucky guy Moose are awesome game animals. I would go during the rut, and learn a cow in heat call, they're not to hard to call in. Bring good binoculars, butchering equipment and a good pack board. Although Yukon Moose are bigger than the moose i've shot, i didn't find it that hard butchering and packing them out, i did have a good guy to help me pack them out each time, it depends on your fitness and strength level. The heaviest thing to pack out was the head,cape and antlers on my bulls i should of caped them off the skull not just to the base of it. The Vermont cow was a super easy pack as it was all down hill, i used a round metal snow sled to pack her out. Your in for good times, can't wait till i do it again.
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Old 05-12-2015, 04:03 AM
  #13  
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Bring dry bags,good rain gear,good clothing
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Old 05-13-2015, 05:33 PM
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Speaking of guides, here's a bit of advice, if required, make sure you have a reputable guide and outfitter. When i hunted Alberta i had to hire a guide, and it was the only time i almost didn't get a moose. My outfitter, whom i communicated with for months about the hunt, hurt his back, thus he couldn't guide me, so he hired a new "experienced" guide to hunt with me, he was a failure! I had to wake him up every morning, all he wanted to do was road hunt, he smoked like a stack & my passenger window wouldn't roll down, he couldn't put chains on his tires i had to, he wanted Wednesday off for laundry and to see his wife, he couldn't/wouldn't gut or cape my Moose and was only good for packing it out! I called and complained to the outfitter, he told my guide to obey me, and the 2nd to last day i guided myself to my bull. He admitted afterwards he never shot a moose and was fired. That was a very expensive lesson for me.
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Old 05-13-2015, 05:55 PM
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Half of those guides in Alberta I severely wonder how in the hell they got their guide licenses! I know several guy's with pretty much the same story as yours gjersy. Worthless as can be. I've only encountered one in Alberta area and he was about as useful as tits on a boar hog! Sad thing was, he had a good reputation! I wished they would change that law a bit to where if you have hunted a certain amount of time as a non resident you wouldn't be REQUIRED to have a guide. I've hunted Canada, Alaska for 30+ years. Hell my guides ask ME questions a lot of times! I usually just do Drop in's in Alaska but I know the 10,000 acre place I hunt pretty well.
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Old 05-13-2015, 06:33 PM
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I hear you superhunt, i won't moose hunt Alberta again it was a money trap. I was wondering do Canada residents need to hire a guide in the US?
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Old 05-13-2015, 07:13 PM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by gjersy View Post
I hear you superhunt, i won't moose hunt Alberta again it was a money trap. I was wondering do Canada residents need to hire a guide in the US?
Hmmm, never thought to ask but I don't imagine so. They would have to adhere to the same non resident regulations that any other non resident would have to I would think. I see the point of it in a LOT of Canadian lands to people that haven't hunted for decades in the areas but I guess they would have a problem distinguishing one from another. Like at which point is one properly assimilated to the country to be allowed to go it alone. Guess it's best to treat all Non residents the same. Still a pain in the butt though.
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:44 AM
  #18  
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Across North America there are mainly two reasons for requiring guides for non-residents. In many instances it is safety related to protect relatively inexperienced hunters hunting truly wild ,remote areas for potentially dangerous game. In some cases severe weather, mountainous terrain, the use of horses for access, etc. are factors.

The second reason, however, is mainly a financial one. It funnels business and revenue from outside the state or province to local outfitters, guides, hunting resorts, etc. In addition to the direct hunting industry, motels, restaurants game processing outfits all share in the bounty. Its kind of a full-employment act for guides and outfitters.

I have had three Alberta hunts. Two in Lac LaBiche for whitetail and one south of Calgary for mule deer. In all cases the guides were absolutely top-notch. They were highly experienced, competent and hard working. I couldn't ask for better. You just have to be very careful and do your homework before booking.
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Old 05-15-2015, 06:51 PM
  #19  
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Ramhunter71, your 1st reason is not needed by experienced hunters. And financial reasons need to be on the reasonable side for the common man.
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Old 05-16-2015, 08:13 AM
  #20  
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I fully agree that experienced hunters do not "need" a guide. But the requirement for non-residents to have a guide to hunt in some states and provinces is often not driven by logic. As an example, a number of years ago, after 21 years of trying, I drew a Wyoming bighorn sheep tag in a wilderness area that the state required non-residents to hire a guide in order to hunt.

However a non-resident that wanted to hike, mountain bike, go camping, fish, hunt mushrooms, etc. could use the same wilderness area with no requirements for using a guide regardless of his experience.
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