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Old 01-24-2013, 12:14 PM
  #11  
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Maps, compass, GPS.
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Old 01-24-2013, 02:41 PM
  #12  
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"Maps, compass, GPS."

Yep, that's exactly right because with the equipment that's out there nowadays
you can tell where you are within 10 feet!
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:43 PM
  #13  
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I doubt most people that hire outfitters follow them around with maps and gps's to make sure they are not trespassing. Maybe part of the answer if you are going to trust an outfitter is to make sure you have an outfitter you can trust. Check him out, get references, see if there's anything about him on the web, talk to people (on blogs if that's what it takes).
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:55 PM
  #14  
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If you can afford an outfitter. You can afford a good GPS with the map of your hunting area.

You can't blame the outfitter if you trespass, and get caught.
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:43 AM
  #15  
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It is very unfair to blame the hunter who is using an outfitter. If an outfitter takes you to an area to hunt, normally people dont ask to see their lease, hunting land permission slip or property tax info. Years ago I hunted with a small outfitter in Fulton County, Il who put me and a couple of other hunters on some property to hunt. After a couple of days of hunting in this area my hunt was over. Couple of weeks later, I spoke with a guy I was hunting with who had stayed a day later to hunt that piece of ground. His stand was next to a cornfield when a truck drove accross the field and pulled up to him and asked why he was hunting there. After explaining how he was hunting with a local outfitter who had put him there, the land owner called the game warden who gathered the info of the outfitter and eventaually charged the outfitter, not the hunter. Hope everything works out for you
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:02 AM
  #16  
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"It is very unfair to blame the hunter who is using an outfitter. If an outfitter takes you to an area to hunt, normally people dont ask to see their lease, hunting land permission slip or property tax info."

Sorry, but that's a copout just like everything else nowadays where it's always somebody else's fault! No matter where you go on a hunt it is up to the HUNTER to know he is legal---no ifs, ands, or buts!!! If you are going to a new area it is very simple to check ahead of time at the register of deeds in the county where you will be to see exactly who owns what and then to insure that either the outfitter is properly licensed by the BLM or NSFS out west or he has a written document to cover the property he's taking you too, regardless of where you are in the US. I hope in this case the OP isn't hung by the whatevers, but it's his fault for "assuming"!
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:30 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Muley Hunter View Post
If you can afford an outfitter. You can afford a good GPS with the map of your hunting area.

You can't blame the outfitter if you trespass, and get caught.
I've never used an outfitter, and I only have a cheap GPS, lol.

I'm just saying, there's a big difference between intentionally trespassing to hunt and trying to do the right thing and relying on someone who turned out to be a bad and/or incompetent guy. Hopefully the justice system will take that into account.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:44 AM
  #18  
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You're doing better than me. I've never owned a GPS.

I am aware of where the private land is where I hunt though. The land owners aren't required to make their land in Colorado. So, it's up to the hunters to know where the private land is.

I try and stay far away from private land, because I don't want an animal that I shot running onto private land.
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Old 01-25-2013, 10:15 AM
  #19  
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"I am aware of where the private land is where I hunt though. The land owners aren't required to make their land in Colorado. So, it's up to the hunters to know where the private land is."

Same here (Illinois now, formerly Wisconsin). Although in Illinois, it's pretty easy to keep track of because there's so little public land available to hunt on, you learn it pretty quick if you hunt at all.
It's funny, I grew up in northern Wisconsin, started hunting in the 1970s. It seemed nobody really cared about trespassing. Of course, that was before hunting became the big business it is today. Nowadays, seems everything is posted.
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