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Old 05-29-2018, 08:10 AM
  #271  
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Originally Posted by Zim View Post
I bought one in 2004 and tried it several times with no success at all. I did not see any purpose to continue. Did have a couple friends claim positive results. I can at least try it again next year I suppose. Should not spook turkeys.
Most people don't know it, but the Thermocell was actually developed under a DOD initiative/grant. It was a collaborative project between the Army and a private entrepreneur, designed to help troops in tropical areas, especially those regions endemic with mosquitos carrying Malaria.

In my opinion it seems to work on anything that flies, and I know firsthand that it will keep you protected from gnats, black flies, skeeters and deer flies. If you bought it in 2004 you got one of the early models - maybe you picked up a lemon or there's some crud inside it that's inhibiting it from getting to proper temperature. After 15 years I had to take my original unit apart last year because it became relatively useless. I blew it out with forced air (low pressure regulated from my air compressor) and then while it was open I used alcohol and cleaned all of the contacts. I could see how a dirty one (or just a bad unit) wouldn't do much - if the element doesn't heat up enough, the pad will not release the repellant...
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Old 05-30-2018, 09:27 AM
  #272  
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Originally Posted by Zim View Post
I bought one in 2004 and tried it several times with no success at all. I did not see any purpose to continue. Did have a couple friends claim positive results. I can at least try it again next year I suppose. Should not spook turkeys.

The actual burning of the repellant will not spook turkeys - HOWEVER - the button to turn it on makes a noticeable 'click' and it takes 2-3 clicks to actually ignite. I've scared birds that were close (that I couldn't see) with the clicking, it's a very unnatural sound to hear in the woods. I either lite it at the truck and carry it in already on, or stuff it inside my coat and vest when I ignite it, to muffle the clicking the best I can...
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Old 06-04-2018, 05:52 AM
  #273  
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Congrats team on a great couple years. Been enjoyable as a small part of the team. Wish yall luck next season and I am sure I'll see ya around. Next April can't get here soon enough!!
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Old 06-08-2018, 12:49 AM
  #274  
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I think I have a good spot picked out fall season.. Since I primarily saw hens I will try to bag one of those this fall.

-Jake
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Old 06-08-2018, 07:31 AM
  #275  
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Hey Jake -

Just a word of advice - if you're shooting the bird to eat for Thanksgiving I recommend you still try to shoot a tom, a jake or even a young poult. It's almost impossible to determine the age of a hen, and older ones are downright quite stringy and tough (pretty much crockpot or jerky birds).

Also, I know you're a relatively newbie to turkey hunting - but realize that most hens have a different fall range, or I should say - move to a different part of their range during the fall.

In the late spring the hens tend to nest next to known summer food sources, typically those areas that have easily accessible water, good dusting areas (for mites), adequate cover and a large population of insects. You often see hens nesting on field edges because the fields provide adequate cover and they're full of grasshoppers and other bugs (fireflies, etc.) - the protein-rich bugs help the poults grow fast.

As summer ends, the bugs start declining and in most regions (especially the Northeast and Midwest) the hens lead the older poults to fruit-and mast-producing areas of the woods to start eating fruits and nuts. They also obviously start moving to croplands, and hit these heavy immediately after harvest - but these are short-lived resources.

Older poults also mean birds capable of flight, so the hens start moving to areas with large roost trees to house their entire brood. In essence, where you see them now is often nowhere near where'll you'll find them October thru March...

S&R
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Old 06-08-2018, 02:41 PM
  #276  
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I'll be focusing on acorns this fall hopefully that gets me into some birds again

-Jake
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Old 06-08-2018, 05:08 PM
  #277  
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Acorns are good, but they love beech and hickory nuts. If you have any of those trees where you hunt, hit those areas heavy when the nuts start hitting the ground...
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Old 06-10-2018, 02:37 PM
  #278  
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Good talking to all you guys. Congrats on a great season. Good luck to all in deer season. Are the final standings out yet?
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