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spreading lime on top of FP

Old 07-20-2010, 04:17 AM
  #1  
Fork Horn
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Default spreading lime on top of FP

can you spread lime on top of your food plots once the plot is already growing?

i have some soybean coming up and i am lucky enough to work for a company who has 100% pure powder lime. spreads easy. just grab a handfull and throw.

what do yall think?
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Old 07-20-2010, 04:51 AM
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Yes, you can. But, it won't help this years plot all that much.
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Old 07-20-2010, 06:52 AM
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What type of Lime is it ? there are several types. You do NOT want to spread Hydrated lime or lime known as Burnt lime, slaked lime, quick lime or oxide lime. It will burn the hell out of green leaves. Aglime would be OK, but I'd wait until nothing was growing. Soybeans can tolerate acidic soil fairly well also.
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Old 07-20-2010, 07:04 AM
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the lime is actaully the bi product of calcium carbide mixed with water that comes from creating acet torch gas.

i have no clue what "type" of lime it is. but i kno it is strong enough to burn you when mixed with water
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Old 07-20-2010, 07:08 AM
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Yup, that sounds like hydrated or burnt lime. They react with water and produce heat. So wait until the beans are dead or gone before spreading. That type of lime will raise the soil pH quickly and not as much is needed as compared to aglime. It won't last quite as long as aglime either.
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Old 07-20-2010, 09:17 AM
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thanks for your help haystack
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Old 07-20-2010, 12:17 PM
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Good info from Haystack. I made an assumption.
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Old 07-20-2010, 03:14 PM
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Additionally, lime should always be worked into the soil if possible. Sometimes it isn't practical, but you get better results if lime has more soil contact to neutralize the soil acidity.
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