Whitetail Deer Hunting Gain a better understanding of the World's most popular big game animal and the techniques that will help you become a better deer hunter.

new hunter need advice

Old 02-08-2015, 05:00 AM
  #11  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,926
Default Military training helps

It helped me. Remaining quiet in the woods. Looking for parts of an animal and not the whole one exposed. How to sit motionless. How to shoot and keep a rifle clean. How to hike deep in the woods. How to use even a compass and not get lost. In shape to climb tree stands. Attention at looking for movement, even slight movement. Good at survival training. Use to moving with minimal supplies. In shape to carry a tree stand into and out of the woods. Looking at film of young military training; not out of shape civilian forty year old hunters.

Lots of things the military taught me in hunting.
Valentine is offline  
Old 02-09-2015, 01:37 PM
  #12  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 1,071
Default

Originally Posted by Calico2311 View Post
I'm a new hunter. Never hunted before. I live in the northwest. So any advice, tips, gear suggestions. Would all be super helpful. Thinking about starting off with dear and smallish game. Until I get my feet and some experience.

Thanks for the input
Also get yourself a hunting/fishing regs handbook from your local hunting store or walmart. Start reading up on the Rules from specific game to general hunting rules. You can also take the 100% online hunters ed course from TX. If you dont want to take a class.

What state are you hunting in? Each state usually has areas or counties that have different bag limits so also be aware of boundaries of these areas.
Wilcam47 is offline  
Old 02-09-2015, 03:18 PM
  #13  
Boone & Crockett
 
Oldtimr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: south eastern PA
Posts: 13,337
Default

I strongly disagree. If you are completly new to hunting and have never done it it is more beneficial to take a hunter education class in person with live instructors that can actually help you and answer questions than to take a shortcut with an online course jst to get it over with. Personally, I do not believe the hunter ed class should be online because it is too eassy to have an experienced hunter take the test and then a complete no nothing is able to buy a license. The more exposure to experienced hunters a new hunter can get, the better. Hunting isn't playing hop scotch.
Oldtimr is offline  
Old 02-09-2015, 03:29 PM
  #14  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 749
Default

I know maryland you have to be over a certent age to take the hunter safety cause online and then if you pass it you must complete a field day and pass it. So if someone else takes the online test you still must pass the field day.
Bbj270 is offline  
Old 02-10-2015, 06:54 AM
  #15  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Calico2311's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: pacific north west
Posts: 28
Default

I'll be hunting in Washington and Oregon. I have looked into classes I'll be taking one in early march. As I felt it was a better option hands down to do the actual Class. As I said 100% newbie here so I need all the help I can get. Though the online is seemed like good option for a year to year refresher
Calico2311 is offline  
Old 02-11-2015, 02:15 PM
  #16  
Fork Horn
 
Outdoor Addiction's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Indiana
Posts: 104
Default

Welcome to the hunting world! I've been hunting for about 8 years now and ask anyone that hunts, you'll learn something new every year. Whether it's the offseason or middle of the rut something will change every year! Wishing you the best of luck in your years to come as a hunter!
Outdoor Addiction is offline  
Old 02-11-2015, 06:22 PM
  #17  
Fork Horn
 
VTBoneCollector's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Vermont
Posts: 483
Default

Originally Posted by Oldtimr View Post
I strongly disagree. If you are completly new to hunting and have never done it it is more beneficial to take a hunter education class in person with live instructors that can actually help you and answer questions than to take a shortcut with an online course jst to get it over with. Personally, I do not believe the hunter ed class should be online because it is too eassy to have an experienced hunter take the test and then a complete no nothing is able to buy a license. The more exposure to experienced hunters a new hunter can get, the better. Hunting isn't playing hop scotch.

I couldn't agree more. If your gonna try hunting, then nothing beats hands on experience, and proper training from an instructor.
VTBoneCollector is offline  
Old 02-15-2015, 12:58 PM
  #18  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location:
Posts: 2,186
Default

Lots of good advice. As a late comer to this string, I can add little. But ... ditto on the 308 Win. Been using it hunting deer for 40+ years. Advice .... don't scrimp on optics. Bad move if you do. What is the best? My answer is the one you can afford. The competition is so keen that about any scope or bino in the same price range will be practically equal.

As far as a hunter safety course? Should you take one ... sure. In person will beat an online approach. But as far as gaining hunting skills ? I doubt that. The courses I have been involved in .. Alabama, Arkansas, Texas, New Mexico, Montana .... all were focused on safety, as they should have been.

I suspect with a military back ground you already are a good shooter, have been trained in map, camp skills, compass use , in decent physical condition, etc. That puts you ahead of the game. I would suggest that you get out in the woods a bunch. Scout where you plan to hunt. Look for "sign" .... such as game trails, last year's rubs and scrapes, food sources such as browse (vines, brush, etc.) and oak bearing trees.

As far as gear .... avoid the gimmicks. If it sounds too to be true, it ain't true. There are no such things as a sure-fire game call, or a bring-em-in from miles around scent, or the perfect cammo pattern. About any quality, quiet woodsy colored clothing will work fine. Though I go out now looking like a walking tree, Lord only knows how many deer I have killed while I was wearing denim bibs and a red/black plaid hunting coat I ahd bought at Sears.

Just like optics, don't go cheap on your hunting shoes/boots. You are going to cover a lot of ground, junky boots = blisters and aching feet.

Hope you have some good luck and welcome to this insane group of deer hunting enthusiasts.
Mojotex is offline  
Old 02-16-2015, 06:47 AM
  #19  
Little Doe Peep
 
sachiko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Japan
Posts: 14,945
Wink

There is a lot of good advice here. Try to spend a LOT of time scouting the area where you are going to hunt. You will learn a lot more about the animals you plan to hunt and it's great fun.

You can also read some books. You can pick up some information from experienced hunters that might take you a long time to learn on your own. My husband swears by "Big Bucks the Benoit Way."
sachiko is offline  
Old 02-16-2015, 08:19 AM
  #20  
Giant Nontypical
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Allegan, MI
Posts: 8,019
Default

Originally Posted by sachiko View Post
There is a lot of good advice here. Try to spend a LOT of time scouting the area where you are going to hunt. You will learn a lot more about the animals you plan to hunt and it's great fun.

You can also read some books. You can pick up some information from experienced hunters that might take you a long time to learn on your own. My husband swears by "Big Bucks the Benoit Way."
Don't know if you heard the news, but one of the Benoit boys just died recently. Those boys and their Dad were known as the gurus of whitetail hunting throughout the whole eastern part of the US for a lot of years.
Topgun 3006 is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.