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Shooting from an elevated position ?

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Shooting from an elevated position ?

Old 12-21-2014, 04:44 AM
  #1  
Fork Horn
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Default Shooting from an elevated position ?

Taking aim on whitetails from 10 to 15 feet from the ground out to 200 yards , at those heights do you aim a little lower than normal ? (With a rifle )

Thanks......

Last edited by White Oak 06; 12-21-2014 at 04:59 AM.
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Old 12-21-2014, 05:20 AM
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I have never changed my point of aim with a rifle when in a tree stand.
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Old 12-21-2014, 05:28 AM
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Fork Horn
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Thanks oldtimr , I shot at a doe out to 150 to 175 yards in low light and I missed.
I could see her and my rifle is on for 200 yards.
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Old 12-21-2014, 06:06 AM
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Unfortunately, sometimes we all miss. Low light can also affect the way we shoot.
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Old 12-21-2014, 06:33 AM
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No. At that shallow an angle no need to adjust. Hold dead-on as you are sighted in for and let 'er go. We all miss sooner or later. I agree with "Oldtimr" ... very low light was probably the culprit.
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Old 12-21-2014, 08:19 AM
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Thanks guys !!!!
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Old 12-23-2014, 04:46 AM
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MZS
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At that range, you are at about 1.15 degrees elevation, which is probably a lot less change in elevation that most typical shots at closer range with even very small hills.

Here is the trigonometry: tangent (1.15 degrees) = 4 yds / 200 yds = opposite/adjacent

Last edited by MZS; 12-23-2014 at 04:53 AM.
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Old 12-23-2014, 05:51 AM
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A couple of the primary stands I hunt have their rests 14-15' off the ground. Feeders at the stands are 45, 85, and 100 yards. No POA correction necessary for POI. Whatever difference that occurs is inside of normal group sizes and so is unrecognizable.
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Old 12-23-2014, 09:31 AM
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Rifle never have changed POA now a bow is a different story DON'T use your 20 yard pin for a deer that is about 5 yards away. Figured that out the hard way this year.
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Old 12-23-2014, 09:55 AM
  #10  
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Unless you're shooting up or down a mountainside, elevation angulation doesn't affect the ToF enough to make enough difference to worry about for hunting.

There are a lot of variables that figure into the geometry of angular shooting, but the simplified version is to simply multiply the line of sight measured range by the cosine of the angle (line of sight = hypotenuse, not "opposite"), hence why a lot of long range shooters use cosine angle indicators on the side of their rifles. For example, if you rangefind a deer at 400yrds, but it's 45degrees down a mountain side, it's actually only 283yrds away: cosine(45) = x/400, 400*cos(45) = 283yrds (cos(45) = .707).

If you're on flat land, then the time of flight difference when shooting at high angle close shots, the angular deviation (moa shift) won't be enough to matter. When shooting long shots, the deviation is too small such that the cosine of the angle will almost 1, so the degree of hold will be negligible.

Angle only matters in the hills.
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