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fertilizing mast\acorn trees for deer

Old 02-15-2011, 07:22 AM
  #1  
Fork Horn
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Default fertilizing mast\acorn trees for deer

get acorns every year

http://www.grandviewoutdoors.com/dee...trees-for-deer
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Old 02-15-2011, 04:24 PM
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The white oaks are annual producers, but very rarely (I'll say never) produce fruit every year. The red and black oaks are every other year producers. They set flower year one, and fruit in year two.

To produce a crop of acorns takes an immense amount of energy, and the temperatures and rainfall, etcetera, are all contributors that will determine the success of the crop. Keep in mind that an Oak typically won't produe acorns til 30-40 years old, which equates to at least 20" in diameter. A good rule of thumb is to expect a crop every 3 to 5 years.

That said, 1 pound of fertilizer per inch of trunk diameter at DBH (4.5 feet from the base crown) is a good rule of thumb. As the article said it is important to release any crowded trees on at least three sides from ANY competing trees in the immediate area. These trees will compete for sun, air circulation and nutrients.

Oaks are very susceptible to soil compaction, which is why many of the Oaks you see along roadsides, die. Keep heavy equipment off of the root zone at all costs. Light scarifying of the soil underneath will allow the nutrients under the canopy to reach the root system. Keep in mind removing the leaves or mulch in the root zone will have a double edged sword effect. It will help weeds grow and will compete for the nutrients you are trying to deliver to the tree. It will also draw deer as they will eat many of those weeds!

Fertilizing Oaks, beeches, and native shrubs and weeds (forbs) etc. is always a good idea, and a lot easier in many instances than trying to establish a food plot. It also has the covert effect of not being discernable by other hunters, yet you will know where they are. The deer will know, also as they know what is good for them and will gravitate to any food source that is higher in nutrients than the same unfertilized species.

Another thing to keep in mind is watch your (N) level of the ferts you are using. This is Nitrogen and you can supply too much, which will have negative effects. Too much nitrogen will often attract insects that can decimate the plants. I would keep it more in the 5-10-10 5-10-5 or 10-10-10 area. A soil test will tell you if more or less is needed.
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Old 02-16-2011, 02:19 AM
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We tried it a couple of years on our property. The site is too remote and miserable to try food plots. What I don't see discussed is lime. If the soil has a low ph, the fertilizer is largely unavailable to the plants. If your soil test shows you need lime, you have to spread that too. We didn't, in our case, and the fertilizer had no noticable affect on the oaks.
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Old 02-16-2011, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Wingbone
We tried it a couple of years on our property. The site is too remote and miserable to try food plots. What I don't see discussed is lime. If the soil has a low ph, the fertilizer is largely unavailable to the plants. If your soil test shows you need lime, you have to spread that too. We didn't, in our case, and the fertilizer had no noticable affect on the oaks.
very good point....get a soil test guys!
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