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If you had to Choose... WWYC?

Old 08-20-2009, 04:42 AM
  #11  
Ava
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I'm going to respond in color to your response.

Originally Posted by UncleNorby
It sounds to me like you are a small-framed person, and the 243 is unwieldy for you. The Marlin is a probably a shorter gun and therefore you feel more steady with it.
I am 5'4 and weigh about 145lbs. I wouldn't call myself skinny but I also wouldn't call myself fat either. I do feel more steady with the 35, maybe because it is shorter.

Will you be walking, stillhunting or driving deer, or will you be primarily stand hunting? We'll be walking into the woods and then stillhunting into a feild. No driving deer.

The weight of the gun won't matter much on a stand, and a good rest will take care of the wobbles. I would like to look into a stand <for the gun> or find a nice stick to rest the gun on. Any suggestions? Would WalMart or Kmart have anything reasonable?

Do you plan on shooting longer ranges (beyond say 175-200 yds) where the 243 would be best suited? Um, I'm sure if a deer was that far, I'd try to shoot at it with the 243. It seems what? the 35 isn't for long range?

If you're not primarily a stand hunter and don't need to shoot too far, I'd go with the lever and put a low power fixed or variable, wide angle scope, or even a peep sight on it.It's already scoped. I don't know what the power is but I can call dad and find out later.

A 35 Rem is a great deer gun. The Marlin lever will have some kick but it is not too bad. Go ahead and shoot it and if it suits your needs better by all means use it.I'm sure it is a great gun. I look forward to shooting it this Sunday.
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Old 08-20-2009, 04:51 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by UncleNorby
I'm assuming you have an older Marlin with only a half-**** safety. If that's the case, you can add a hammer spur. They are often added if the gun is scoped, so you don't get your thumb caught between the scope and the hammer. That will give you a lot more to hang onto and it won't slip as easily. Marlin might even send you one for nothing if you call them.
I think what I have to do is just grip the safety a little more on my thumb around the first joint of my thumb so it has no chances of slipping past. It's not smooth but has ridges in it.

I wish my camera worked so I could show you what it looks like. I'm sure you already know what a 35 lever action looks like. I just went to look and it has nice room between the scope and the safety. Looks like an extension off the hammer, almost like a tag if I can explain it that way. <darn newbie terms anyways> I don't know how old the gun is.
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Old 08-20-2009, 05:03 AM
  #13  
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Several companies make shooting sticks that are light and meant to carried while still hunting/stalking. I know of one that attaches to a gun sling, and they deploy quickly. I don't know if they are noisy. For all my stillhunting, I don't bother with shooting sticks. My shots are always under 100 yds and I can usually lean on a tree for a longer shot. If you will be spending much time in one spot watching a field shooting sticks may be a good idea.

Be sure to check how the scoped marlin fits your frame. You should shoulder the gun, close your eyes, and put yourself into a comfortable shooting position. Then open your eyes and see where you are in relation to the scope. You may need to move it forward or backward (more likely if the gun was set up for someone larger than you) in the mounts to get the proper eye relief. You'll know it's right when you see a full sight picture inside the scope. You can test this by moving your eye closer to the scope and then further away. There will be a short range somewhere in that motion where you see a full picture.
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Old 08-20-2009, 05:11 AM
  #14  
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Your gun has a safety, and that is when the hammer is set half way between fully c_cked (insert an "o") and where it contacts the firing pin. It's called a half-c_ck safety. The thing you are gripping is called a hammer, not a safety. Just details.

In capable hands I'm sure deer could be taken pretty easily with a .35 out to 225-250 yds. I don't shoot a whole lot and I would use the 35 if I knew most shots would be within 100 yds. If I expected to be shooting beyond that, I'd opt for the 243. Just my opinion though.
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Old 08-20-2009, 07:19 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by timbercruiser
.243 would be my choice.

I'll 2nd that!
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Old 08-20-2009, 07:45 AM
  #16  
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Sounds like a youth .243 would be the ticket...

Don't worry about off hand wobble, good marksmen learn to take a rest in the field...Learn to squirrel hunt with a .22, after awhile you learn to stop by a tree, there's your rest...

Most deer hunters use a bolt action rifle they are more accurate, the action is stronger and the trigger can be easily adjusted...Stick with the bolt action .243...I've had mine since 1980...
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Old 08-20-2009, 01:27 PM
  #17  
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Was shooting the 243 today and I really love it. I think it's my gun but will be shooting the 35 this weekend just to be sure <haven't shot it yet>.

You guys are so good to me.
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Old 08-20-2009, 03:16 PM
  #18  
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You said that you're new to hunting and it seems to me that whoever your mentor is failed to teach you one of the most important aspects of being a hunter. One of the first rules that should have been taught to you is; use any excuse possible to create a "need" to buy a new gun. Instead of just settling for one of these two guns go find one that is perfect for you. Since you like the marlin lever action you should look into buying one in 30-30, it kicks less that the .35 and with Hornady Leverevolution ammo it will easily kill deer at 250 yards.
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Old 08-20-2009, 03:52 PM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by Centaur 1
You said that you're new to hunting and it seems to me that whoever your mentor is failed to teach you one of the most important aspects of being a hunter. One of the first rules that should have been taught to you is; use any excuse possible to create a "need" to buy a new gun. Instead of just settling for one of these two guns go find one that is perfect for you. Since you like the marlin lever action you should look into buying one in 30-30, it kicks less that the .35 and with Hornady Leverevolution ammo it will easily kill deer at 250 yards.
Hmmm. New gun sounds exciting but sometimes the funds keep you from getting what you want. Someday, I will be able to buy my own but for now, I will be using dad's.

Last edited by Ava; 08-20-2009 at 05:02 PM.
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Old 08-20-2009, 06:00 PM
  #20  
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I'm more of a "Stick with one gun and learn how to use it"...

Keep the .243, it will do all that needs doing...
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