Video & Photography Tips, tricks, and suggestions for videotaping and photographing your hunts.

Cannon Rebel..

Old 12-26-2011, 02:54 PM
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Default Cannon Rebel..

Hi all, I just recieved a Canon Rebel for shooting some wildlife pics with this summer and fall.. Is this a decent camera for stuff like this? It is a Rebel T3 EOS that I will be needing to read the manual on it. I am just wondering you folks may think of it for the main purpose I will be wanting to use it on.. 18 to 55mm zoom EFS lense..

Last edited by Phil from Maine; 12-27-2011 at 06:31 PM.
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Old 12-27-2011, 05:30 AM
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That should be a great camera for you. A good telephoto lens will help a l ot with those long distance shots. Something in the range of 250-300 mm will be very usefull. Oh, and a decent tripod too.
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Old 12-27-2011, 06:37 PM
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Thanks for the reply.. I am planning on getting a stronger lense for it sometime in the future.. I am not sure when that will be though.. Also thinking about a polarized cap to place over the lense when doing pics around water and the like.. I am thinking that with my knowledge of cameras it will take some getting used to. I am just hoping it will turn out to be usefull when trying to get wildlife photos..
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Old 01-07-2012, 06:31 PM
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Get a nice telephoto lens and you're on your way. Canon Rebel is a great quality camera. I would suggest a 70-300mm lens for a good start.
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Old 01-18-2012, 09:48 PM
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Congrats on your new Canon. It will be capable of taking some fine pics with practice. Be sure you study up on Canon's post processing which should be included with your camera. Learning to shoot Raw images instead of just jpegs will add to your picture image quality in the long run. Like others have suggested, a lens in the 300mm range would be a good start for wildlife images. A Tamron 70-300 zoom would be a great 3rd party lens that won't break the bank. Have fun.
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Old 01-22-2012, 05:49 AM
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Thanks for all the input guys.. I am planning on looking into the 70 - 300 zoom everyone talks about..
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Old 02-01-2012, 07:10 AM
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Polarized filters are nice, but unless they are the real high end ones you will lose up to 1 1/2 stops. May not sound like much but when dealing with wildlife photography you are typically shooting in twilight conditions and since a typical 70-300mm lens only opens up to f/5.6 at 300mm (and usually the results at 300mm f/5.6 are less then desired) 1 stop is a lot to trade for the results of a polarized filter. You would be better off putting the money used to buy a polarized filter towards a good cable release or tri-pod. Don't forget to buy some decent post production software, Adobe Lightroom or similar.
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Old 03-16-2012, 02:01 PM
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Thanks for the input everyone..

I just sent out for a new lens to try.. It is a Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Lens that I am hoping will do the trick. I am still planning on a Polarized filter lens for when I am around the water during bright light. I am thinking this will cut down on the reflection some what..

Thanks again, Phil
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Old 03-22-2012, 11:36 AM
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What AF Hunter said....get a long lense like a 300mm. That canon is just fine for your needs.
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Old 03-28-2012, 01:13 PM
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Thanks for the tips everyone.. Now I have to read up and learn how to use it.. I saw three deer today while scouting for a trailcam placement. Here is a couple of pics I took even though they are blurred somewhat. I find what I believe to be a young piebald buck quite interesting. Now I want to see what his daddy looks like.. Here are two of the pics I took this morning..



All three of them..

the young piebald

Itried it again this morning and saw the same 3 deer..

And this little guy lost in the snow...LOL

Last edited by Phil from Maine; 03-30-2012 at 09:24 AM.
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