Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > General Hunting Forums > Turkey Hunting
 how do you count patterns >

how do you count patterns

Turkey Hunting Whether it's spring or fall doesn't matter to this bunch. Great tips on calling, bustin flocks, using blinds and more.

how do you count patterns

Old 03-02-2005, 09:45 AM
  #1  
st1
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: SW GA
Posts: 58
Default how do you count patterns

I was just curious as to how everyone else counts pellets in the kill zone. I count only the ones touching the spine and brain on a turkey outline target. Is this the way most folks count them or do you count pellets hitting anywhere within the turkey outline.
st1 is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 11:34 AM
  #2  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Columbus Ohio USA
Posts: 225
Default RE: how do you count patterns

I have done what you suggest but I think a better measure of pattern performance is to count hits within a 10" circle and see how evenly the pattern is dispersed within that circle. If my pattern can cover a 10" circle in a uniform manner then I have a pretty good shot at killing a turkey that is within the range that I patterended my gun. I hope this helps.
Buckeye Mike is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 03:02 PM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: chiefland Florida USA
Posts: 5,417
Default RE: how do you count patterns

same here;some people count what's in the lines. to me nothing counts unless its in the spine or brain.if not the bird is no dead.a 10" circle is a good space to look at,if your off a few inches,you can still kill.
Tree climber is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 04:08 PM
  #4  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Pa
Posts: 4,647
Default RE: how do you count patterns

st1 yes that is what you are looking for You can do the 10" circle thing but I would always throw a few at the ol reliable turkey target
Mr. Longbeard is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 05:56 PM
  #5  
Typical Buck
 
Jollyarcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Central PA
Posts: 590
Default RE: how do you count patterns

Hmmmm... well, first I'd shoot at a target, then I guess I'd walk up there, then go, "1... 2... 3... 4 " Ok, ok, I'm sorry, I just couldn't resist. [8D]

Seriuosly, the 10" (or 12") circle method is likely the most accepted method for patterning turkey loads. Your goal is to find the most concentrated area of your guns payload at your given hunting distance with the choke / shell combination that works best in your gun. No two guns are the same, so a bit of trial and error with different shot sizes and choke constrictions is probably going to be necessary to achieve the best results.

Another pellet count / patterning method would be to pattern your gun using a 30" target. Check to be certain that your gun is hitting point of aim, fire at the center and then count the number of pellets in that 30" circle. Dividing the 30" circle into 4 quadrants will help you obtain an accurate pellet count.

Now, take the manufactures number of pellets published for the shell that you just shot and compare it to the actual number of hits on your 30" target. This will allow you to calculate the percentage of hits within the given target size for that particular load fired from your gun.

I employ both these methods at once... in that drawing a 10" circle within the 30" circle gives me the data collection for both of the above, after firing only one shot. You can use the turkey target within this same 30" circle too, allowing you to view hits to the brain / spine area of the bird, while giving you an overview on how well the pattern stayed togther surrounding the turkey head target. You can use these targets later to compare groups of pellets, which will help you choose the right choke, (tighter or more open), to dial in the shells you prefer for turkey hunting.

Take some time and remember to clean your barrel after each round of 5 shots. Remove all oil / gun lube and plastic fouling. Failing to do so will degrade your shot pattern and yield less than what the actual combo is capable of. Patterning can be time consuming, but it's fun too.

Another side benefit from all this work is that you become much better with your gun. The confidence alone in that the shot you are about to take is one you can make. It's a great sport and we all owe the bird that much.
Jollyarcher is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 06:20 PM
  #6  
Typical Buck
 
MKMGOBL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Contoocook NH USA
Posts: 818
Default RE: how do you count patterns

Hmmmm... well, first I'd shoot at a target, then I guess I'd walk up there, then go, "1... 2... 3... 4 " Ok, ok, I'm sorry, I just couldn't resist.
Jolly, is that as far as you can count? I'm only good up 10 myself! 20 if I'm barefooted[8D]
MKMGOBL is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 06:52 PM
  #7  
Dominant Buck
 
Chuck7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 25,113
Default RE: how do you count patterns

Some of you good folks said to count the number of shot in a 10" circle.OK , what would be a good number of pellets in my 10" circle if I'm shooting 2 3/4 inch #4 Magnum load. This will be my first serious year of turkey hunting.Today I was aiming for a 2" circle and my Ithica 37put 28 pellets in it. How far away should I be shooting the paper?
Thanks,
Chuck
Chuck7 is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 07:31 PM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: chiefland Florida USA
Posts: 5,417
Default RE: how do you count patterns

I would go to 20 yards , then on out 25 ; 30 ; 35:for me that is about as far as I want to shoot one(Isaid want to shoot one).if you are putting 28 pellets in a 2" circle at 20 to 25 yards,you have a hellofa turkey gun.
How far from target were you?sounds like you are off to a good start.it's time consumeing to pattern a gun,it is also a must if you are gonna be a good hunter.it is also fun if you have a partner , you shoot and then he or she shoots.

have fun,enjoy and good luck.
Tree climber is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 07:43 PM
  #9  
Typical Buck
 
Jollyarcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Central PA
Posts: 590
Default RE: how do you count patterns

LOL... takes me too long to take my boots off. By the time I do get them off, I forgot what I took them off for. Then I usually fall asleep dreaming of the boss gobbler.

Now, I don't want Tree yelling at me here... 'cause I like Tree... plus trees are our friends... they let me see whitetails before they can see my arrow rip through their boiler room. BUT, (ewww... the dreaded "but"), there isn't any way I've been able to count pellets at 20 yards with turkey loads, as there's a ragged 3 1/2" hole where the shot impacted.

Experiment a little and I'm certain you'll find the right combo that performs just as well out of your gun.
Jollyarcher is offline  
Old 03-02-2005, 08:03 PM
  #10  
Typical Buck
 
Jollyarcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Central PA
Posts: 590
Default RE: how do you count patterns

ORIGINAL: Chuck7
How far away should I be shooting the paper?
Thanks,
Chuck
Hey there Chuck... I forgot to add, and this is just me, but I do most of my testing right at 40 yards. Occassionally, I'll let one rip at 30, but only after I've decided what round I'm going to stay with. If it won't perform at 40, I'm not wasting my time on that load.

For starters, I'll fire one round at 10 yards. The reason here is to be sure that my gun is hitting point of aim. Make sight adjustments if need be, then move right out to 40 yards with a 30" target. I'll experiment with chokes and different shells at 40 until I have a pattern that makes a turkey target say Uncle, and then, just for fun, I'll hammer a 30 yard target.

There's really nothing wrong with shooting paper at 20, 25, 30, and so on, and I can see the benefit too. Once you have your load dialed in, shooting these ranges will let you know for sure where your pattern is when sending the payload scorching toward the gobblers cranium.
Jollyarcher is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.