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Stand heght for recurve?

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Stand heght for recurve?

Old 10-16-2004, 06:26 PM
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Default Stand heght for recurve?

How high do you like your stand to be? What's too high?
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Old 10-16-2004, 10:30 PM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

I've never found a tree that I could get too high in. 25' is optimum for me, but I'd go higher if I could. Don't see a need to go a lot higher, but it depends on the situation. I've seen a lot of deer come in looking up, but they generally only look up so high. One thing to consider is the degree of difficulty is increased the higher you go--be sure to practice from the heights you hunt at. Regardless of whether you are 10' or 60' up a tree, 10 yds from the base of it is 10 yds--unless you use sights or gap, it can be tricky convincing your brain of that.

Chad
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Old 11-15-2004, 07:05 PM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

how is that possible? 10 yards from base of tree is 10 yards? if ur 25 feet up a tree is it not then 13 yards? or does it even matter since you would still be shooting at a shapr angle down? just curious
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Old 11-15-2004, 11:24 PM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

It's kind of confusing depending on how you look at it. Just remember that the arrows trajectory is only affected by a straight-line distance, not the angle up or down. It's the same if you are shooting up. Think of it like this--over-simplified, but hopefully it is a clear illustration (man--not used to using big words like that!).

If you were 300 feet up a tower and shooting at a target 3 feet from the base of the tower, would you need to hold for 100 yds, 101 yds, or 1 yd? The same applies if you were standing 3 feet from the base of that tower shooting at a target 300 feet up.

That's why it's important to practice different situations, especially from treestands if you hunt from them. Convincing your brain that what looks like 20 yds actually is a lot less can cause you to bugger a shot.

Chad
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Old 11-17-2004, 12:38 PM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

The actual distance is the hypothenuse of the triangle created. So if you are 25ft up a tree and the deer is at 10yds. The straight line distance is just over 11yds.

If you go back to geometry class and use the Pathagarean theorem which A squared plus B squared = C squared. The square root of C is the distance.
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Old 11-17-2004, 02:27 PM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

how can it be 11?

(25x25) + (30x30)=625+900=1525 the saquare root of which is 39.05. divide that by 3 to get the measurement in yards and u get 13.016. thats how i figured it before. or...
(8.3x8.3) + (10x10)=69.44+100=169.44 the square rrot of which is still 13.01yards

all this assumes the tree is perpendicular to the ground (no accounting for slightly leaning trees, hills etc.). i might have made an arithmetic mistake, if so let me know. i have worked it several times and cant figure out how u got 11.
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Old 11-17-2004, 05:00 PM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

I probably didn't use the proper terms--by straight line I meant just that, not an angle-- but I hope I made the point. The deer is 10 yds from the tree regardless if you are on the ground or 100 feet up--shoot accordingly. Being up in a stand can fool you into thinking the distance is farther than it actually is--practice from a stand will help rememdy that.

Chad
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Old 11-17-2004, 05:14 PM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

I understand I think. The distance from the person to the deer is greater in a tree stand than it would be on the ground. That much is mathmatically certain. Your point, if I understand you, is that it does not affect how you shoot , though it looks and is farther? just a weird thing about stand hunting I guess, and I have never shot a traditional bow out of a stand so I wouldn't know, I'm just trying to get the physics of it.
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Old 11-18-2004, 01:05 AM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

Basically, yes. As with the tower illustration, the arrow would have to travel a bit over 100 yds, but you wouldn't have to allow for the arrow to drop over that distance even though it travels that far. The term I was looking for is paralell distance instead of straight. Shooting from a stand won't require adjusting for the actual distance the arrow travels, at least not at a hunting distance. If you were shooting from a very high stand and taking a very long shot, there might be a little bit more drop because the arrow would be in the air a fraction longer than on a straight shot, but I can't picture any situation where anyone would need to take a shot like this. We're not going to shoot that far hunting, or be that high, and I've never heard of a course with a target set out like that.

Chad
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Old 11-18-2004, 05:51 AM
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Default RE: Stand heght for recurve?

Don't make me sic Etothepi on you guys !
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