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Your Opinion Needed Please!!!

Old 09-11-2011, 03:47 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Question Your Opinion Needed Please!!!

Ok Folks heres the deal. Was in to my local archery shop to get a new string but on my bow. I go pick it up and bring it home to shoot and run 15 arrows through it and notice that the d loop they installed starting fraying really bad to the point where I was afraid to shoot in fear of it breaking. So took the bow back to have them reinstall an new loop. The guy tells me that he will do it quick while I wait. So I turn around to look at some products and all of a sudden I hear "Thwang" and look over to see me string on my bow cut in half. So now my question is, could there be damage to my limbs by this guy straight up cutting my string with out the bow in a press. To me seems like it would almost be a dry fire. Any input would be great. Thanks in advance!!

Last edited by BeerNuts; 09-12-2011 at 11:28 AM.
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Old 09-12-2011, 02:25 PM
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I'm no expert. It would seem to me, though, that cutting a string on an undrawn bow would be considerably less stressful than dryfiring a bow primarily because the bow is undrawn. There's a lot more energy stored in the bow when its drawn. I'm not saying that cutting the string like that is a good idea or that it would not cause a problem, just that it's probably not as stressful as a dry fire. Good luck.
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Old 09-13-2011, 04:44 AM
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It's a whole lot more dangerous to the person that cuts the string than to the bow, but there is still a lot of energy being suddenly released. There have been a couple of reports of people being killed doing something like that. Extremely rare, but possible.

Why did he cut the string? Or did it break at just that time? If the string was already damaged enough to break, he should have put it in a press immediately. Or maybe he didn't have time to do that?

The first thing to look at with a fraying D-loop is your release. There is probably a burr on it that is damaging the loop. Often easy to fix with a file and / or sand paper. A D-loop will last almost indefinitely if it's not damaged. Immediately stop shooting and find the reason for ANY fraying. It will almost always be your release.

If this guy cut the string on purpose, you might want to have the bow checked out and repaired by a more competent tech.

Allen
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Old 09-13-2011, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by aread View Post
It's a whole lot more dangerous to the person that cuts the string than to the bow, but there is still a lot of energy being suddenly released. There have been a couple of reports of people being killed doing something like that. Extremely rare, but possible.

Why did he cut the string? Or did it break at just that time? If the string was already damaged enough to break, he should have put it in a press immediately. Or maybe he didn't have time to do that?

The first thing to look at with a fraying D-loop is your release. There is probably a burr on it that is damaging the loop. Often easy to fix with a file and / or sand paper. A D-loop will last almost indefinitely if it's not damaged. Immediately stop shooting and find the reason for ANY fraying. It will almost always be your release.

If this guy cut the string on purpose, you might want to have the bow checked out and repaired by a more competent tech.

Allen
Allen

Dont think he ment to cut the string he was cutting the d-loop off and think he sliped and got the string. I have checked my release and no burr or anything. Have been using the same release for 2 years and not wearing on my other d-loop so I think it was just a bad spot in the d-loop string. Thanks for your input!!!
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Old 09-14-2011, 07:54 AM
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You will need to have someone (not this tech) check the limbs for hairline cracks or splinters. It is not as bad as a dry fire but could easily have the same effect. Any damage to the limb can sometimes be hard to spot by someone who doesn't know what to look for. The shop should cover a new string and any defects in the limbs obviously.
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Old 09-16-2011, 11:25 AM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by BeerNuts View Post
Allen

Dont think he ment to cut the string he was cutting the d-loop off and think he sliped and got the string. I have checked my release and no burr or anything. Have been using the same release for 2 years and not wearing on my other d-loop so I think it was just a bad spot in the d-loop string. Thanks for your input!!!
How did this work out with the shop? I would hope that it's been resolved by now.

Keep an eye on your new D-loop. There is a reason that the old one failed and it probably hasn't been fixed yet.

If you have to change a D-loop, you remove it with needle nose pliers. Hold the "live" part of the knot with the pliers and push the loop part of the knot. Never touch the string with the plyers, only the loop.

I tighten my loops with a pair of snap ring pliers and get them much tighter than most. With this technique, I have no difficulty removing loops safely. No knives needed.

Allen

Last edited by aread; 09-16-2011 at 11:30 AM.
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Old 09-19-2011, 06:07 AM
  #7  
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In addition to checking the limbs, you also want someone to go over the cams and axles too. They could have gotten cracked or bent in the process. Tell this guy of the little trick I use to prevent this from happening. Go buy a dental pic or similar tool to slide in between the string and D loop knot before you cut. Use a razor knife that is very sharp, and watch what you are doing. If you are careful, this should never happen.
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Old 10-08-2011, 07:57 PM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by bronko22000 View Post
In addition to checking the limbs, you also want someone to go over the cams and axles too. They could have gotten cracked or bent in the process. Tell this guy of the little trick I use to prevent this from happening. Go buy a dental pic or similar tool to slide in between the string and D loop knot before you cut. Use a razor knife that is very sharp, and watch what you are doing. If you are careful, this should never happen.
Yep....just check everything
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Old 10-11-2011, 05:47 PM
  #9  
Spike
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Originally Posted by aread View Post
How did this work out with the shop? I would hope that it's been resolved by now.

Keep an eye on your new D-loop. There is a reason that the old one failed and it probably hasn't been fixed yet.

If you have to change a D-loop, you remove it with needle nose pliers. Hold the "live" part of the knot with the pliers and push the loop part of the knot. Never touch the string with the plyers, only the loop.

I tighten my loops with a pair of snap ring pliers and get them much tighter than most. With this technique, I have no difficulty removing loops safely. No knives needed.

Allen
Allen

Ended up stoping back there and talked to the owner of the shop and got every thing figured out in a real timely. He to me if I ever encounter any problems to bring it back and he, himself would take care of it. So Im pleased
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Old 10-12-2011, 06:35 AM
  #10  
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I've worked on a lot of bows with broken strings (without string loops) where the string was damaged under the serving. Most had no problems but, a thorough inspedtion is called for.

Let's not be too hard on the tech, though. Most of us have had this kind of accident (learning experience) happen. "Man, it's 3:00 and I need to get to my stand by 4:00. Can you fix this?" "I think so, just give me a minute." THWANG!! "Man, don't try that again." That's where all those precautionary statements like "cut away from the string", "don't get the flame too close when you're melting the serving/string loop", and "don't bump the string/cables with your broadhead", came from.
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