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Arrow tuning

Old 04-16-2007, 08:26 AM
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Nontypical Buck
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Default Arrow tuning

I was wondering if anyone would help me understand more about this. I have heard some of you mention tuning arrows, adjusting nocks and inserts, etc. I was hoping someone would go into some detail about tuning an arrow and if there is a difference in tuning an aluminum arrow versus a carbon arrow. Also, do you tune an arrow for your bow or do you just tune an arrow independently of the bow?

I would just like to understand more about the arrow and how to make one effectively. Thanks for any information you would care to give.
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Old 04-16-2007, 09:19 AM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

Tuning is a three part process. Tune the archer, tune the bow and tune the arrow. Each part has to be working together for the best accuracy and best arrow flight.

I notice that you live in Maryland. You might consider taking advantage of this seminar:

http://www.huntingnet.com/forum/tm.aspx?m=2092861

You can also download the Easton Tuning Guide from their website, but it is a little confusing since it discusses tuning for all types of bowsat the same time. It is also beginning to get a little dated.

To answer a couple of your questions:
If you are bow hunting, you want the best arrow flight as well as accuracy so for the basicsyou tune the arrow to the bow and to the archer. However, there is a lot more to it than this.

For outdoor target shooting, you also tune the trilogy because you are shooting are different distances.

For indoor tournement shooting at one distance, you only need the arrows to match as perfectly as possible. You don't really care how they fly as long as they fly to the X every time. Again, there is a lot more to it than this.

Aluminum vs. carbon arrows - carbon arrows are less critical of spine matching than are aluminum arrows. The basic tuning techniques are the same. Arrow spine selection is a little more important with aluminum arrows.

Adjusting or twistingnocks is one of the last things that you do during tuning. Once you have the trilogy tuned for one arrow, you are shooting to determine which arrows shoot together. Every dozen of arrows have some that for some reason, won't group with the others. Generally, the more you pay for your arrows the better the yield. However, this is not always the case. Nock alignment is one of the biggest reasons that one arrow doesn't group with the others. Twisting the nock will sometimes align the nock. Sometimes not.

As I've mentioned, there is a lot more to it than this.

Check out Len's seminar. He addresses all of these problems several times every day.
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Old 04-16-2007, 09:28 AM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

ORIGINAL: AllenRead

Tuning is a three part process. Tune the archer, tune the bow and tune the arrow. Each part has to be working together for the best accuracy and best arrow flight.

I notice that you live in Maryland. You might consider taking advantage of this seminar:

http://www.huntingnet.com/forum/tm.aspx?m=2092861
LOL I just got off of the phone with Len. My deposit will be in the mail in about 15 minutes. He sold me my bow and helped me get started but down where I live the "pro shops" and advice I can find leave a little to be desired.

I have just started making my own arrows (carbon)and while I can get them to fly well (good groups and even a RH at 33 yards) there is so much more I want/need to know.

I understand that tuning is really a symbiotic thing between archer, bow and arrow but being new to this I am looking for as much information on the bow and arrow part that I can find. I do have the easton tuning guide and have used it for the bow setup, among other resources, but am looking for additional input from some of the folks here. I have learned a great deal from them already.

I am just concerned with bowhunting and how to become a good bowhunter.
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Old 04-16-2007, 09:54 AM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

If you want to be a better bowhunter you need to know your equipment very well and you will if you practice enough and do as much of the hands on as you can imho.Once you feel comfortable and confident with your set-up you need to know your limits/effective killing range for YOU.Learn to judge yardage and or buy a rangefinder--you can't hit anything if you don't know the yardage!Hang out on these forums and soak up as much information as you can and although you can learn from other peoples stories and advice there is no substitute for HANDS ON EXPERIENCE.
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Old 04-16-2007, 10:14 AM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

I agree, that is why I started making my own arrows. So that I can try different fletchings/fletching configs, different arrows, etc. and see how they fly from my bow. That is part of the reason for this thread, to learn more about my equipment and how to set it up.
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Old 04-16-2007, 05:48 PM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

Bruce. To tune an arrow you must to the best of your abilities make everyting line up in one straight line going through the center of the shaft from nock to tip. There isnt any science to tunning an arrow all you have to do is spin it on a flat surface and see if there is any wobble where the components meet like the broadhead, insert and nock. Now to get rid of the wobble I try and use the A.S.D tool from G5 it squars the sharf and insert to make a better fit and usualy takes care of any wobble problems. You asked about tuning an arrow to a bow, the only thing you have to make sure is that your have the correct size and spine arrow for your set up. After that you can get your bow tuned to shoot the arrows straight, as long as you do your part with your form you should be good to go.
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Old 04-19-2007, 02:54 PM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

how do i mount a broadhead

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Old 04-19-2007, 06:25 PM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

realtreegator, most modern arrows and broadheads are screw in. To "mount" it basicly just pull it out of the package being careful not to cut yourself and screw it in the arrow.
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Old 04-25-2007, 05:04 AM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

I was hoping someone would go into some detail about tuning an arrow and if there is a difference in tuning an aluminum arrow versus a carbon arrow. Also, do you tune an arrow for your bow or do you just tune an arrow independently of the bow?
Bruce, here a quick overview of what I do. My goal is to get the exact correct dynamic spine with a good amount of weight on the tip and a lot of drag on the rear. This concept will allow for great flight with a broadhead. It has to be tuned your bow, with you shooting it, if you want ideal flight. Here's how I go about it.

1) Pick a shaft based on the spine I think I'll need with my arrow length, draw length and tip weight I want. This takes some practice, so if you're unsure, get some advise before putting your money down.

2)If carbon, spine test the arrows and mark the stiff side. Cull any that don't fall within . 010 of the average.

3)Fletch a couple arrows (I always use feathers attached with a helical for greatest drag). Cock feather is put on mark for stiff side. Put tips on the fletched ones and a couple bareshaft ones.

4)Bareshaft test to get spine perfect. This involves adding/subtracting tip weight, changing draw weight and/or cutting the shaft on the bareshaft arrows to arrive at the ideal spine for that arrow and your bow setup.

5)Finish building the dozen arrows. When cutting to length, I cut equal amounts from both ends (most inconsistant part of the arrow).

6)Spin test broadhead to make sure they are perfectly aligned.

7)Practice like a man possessed.
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Old 04-25-2007, 07:58 AM
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Default RE: Arrow tuning

Straightarrow, thank youvery much for the in depth reply.

I have started implementing some of the things you mention. Through a bit of trial and error I believe I now know the spine range for my rig (approx. 0.400 maybe a little less). I need to get some in this range now.

I don't have a spine tester but I really like working/experimenting with arrows. I suppose it would be worth getting. Any recommendations?

I have fletched (no feathers but have tried 2.5" quikspins, 2" blazers and 4" vanes)and bareshafted and that is how I determined the spine I think I need.

I have been cutting from both ends. After spin testing bare shafts I came to the conclusion that you mention, The straightest (most consistant)part is in the "middle".
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