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afraid to let go of checkcord :-(

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afraid to let go of checkcord :-(

Old 10-18-2010, 06:33 AM
  #1  
Spike
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Question afraid to let go of checkcord :-(

With hunting season about to start I am afraid to let go of my 16 month english pointer. I have put a considerable amount into working on 'Recall." I use the checkcord/Here method. Lately started using ecollar with slight nick when saying "here." In my backyard and when training afield with checkcord he comes to me 99% of time. When in backyard and no cord he comes to me all the time. But as soon as I let go while afield he takes off like a bat of hell and I have to chase him. Thank goodness for the beeper but in high winds or long distances I lose the sound. It's scary to think I could lose him (especially on 2,500 acres). Now I know there are those that say english pointers are BIG runners which is ok. But for me I don't want him going past 100 yds (especially here on Long Island,NY). Am I doing something wrong? Can someone help me keep him close. Is there a diferent training drill I can use?
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Old 10-18-2010, 12:42 PM
  #2  
Typical Buck
 
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When you let go of him and the field, does he just take off never to return again or does he just take a big first cast and then settle back?

There are things that you can do to keep him close, but I have found that it is better just to let the dog hunt in the range he is comfortable with. Otherwise, you are going to have to stay on him constantly to keep him in your range rather than allowing him to comfortably work in his range.

If he's a big ranging dog and you're hunting tight cover, you might consider getting a Garmin Astro. Takes the risk of losing the dog out of the scenario.
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Old 10-18-2010, 11:35 PM
  #3  
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Big running pointers can be hard to reign in. Do what mustad suggests, let the dog run alittle to burn all the pent up energy before starting the hunt. But if the dogs natural range is to run big, unfortuneately, I have not heard of a good solution.

We had a young big running pointer in our group once. The dog was trained to quarter (which is frowned upon today in FTs). We would position ourselves about 30 yards apart with about 5 people on average. We would walk the fields and the dog quartered for all of us so it had to range close considering it had to run 150 yards crosswise. Then again, the dog was hunting for us and not for itself. My current dog I have to reign in sometimes because she gets too excited and starts hunting by herself.

Get a whistle (not a silent dog whistle) and start overlaying commands with it. The sound will carry longer distances than voice will. The next suggestion would be is to get an ecollar with a long range - up to 1.5 miles.
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Old 10-19-2010, 03:58 AM
  #4  
Spike
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Originally Posted by Mite View Post
Big running pointers can be hard to reign in. Do what mustad suggests, let the dog run alittle to burn all the pent up energy before starting the hunt. But if the dogs natural range is to run big, unfortuneately, I have not heard of a good solution.

We had a young big running pointer in our group once. The dog was trained to quarter (which is frowned upon today in FTs). We would position ourselves about 30 yards apart with about 5 people on average. We would walk the fields and the dog quartered for all of us so it had to range close considering it had to run 150 yards crosswise. Then again, the dog was hunting for us and not for itself. My current dog I have to reign in sometimes because she gets too excited and starts hunting by herself.

Get a whistle (not a silent dog whistle) and start overlaying commands with it. The sound will carry longer distances than voice will. The next suggestion would be is to get an ecollar with a long range - up to 1.5 miles.

I do have a whistle and ecollar and have been overlaying on commands. But there may be some truth in that he's just extremely excited and wants to get going. I should give him a chance but it is scary to think I could lose him.
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Old 10-21-2010, 07:07 AM
  #5  
Fork Horn
 
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He understands what u want at home so obviously knows the commands. I say turn the juice up till he listens in the field. Get his attention a couple times and all you will need is the the tone after that.
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Old 10-22-2010, 04:21 AM
  #6  
Spike
 
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Always "air him out" before your hunts, those high strung dogs need to settle into their hunts. Also, look into other "HERE" training methods. One of the most effective I have found requires two people, a 75' and 40' check chord, e collar and trailer hitch (as a 2 to 1). In a few 10 min sessions you will have there "HERE" command issues solved.
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