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Coydog?

Old 03-04-2015, 11:55 AM
  #21  
Spike
 
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I'm not trying to argue either, just stateing what a lifetime in the outdoors has shown me. I have a good friend that is ADC. Between us, we have observed the out of doors far more than a vast majority ever will. I can tell you there are many over educated persons that have never put their time in, filling spots within our game departments. It is pure fact that dogs and coyotes can cross and that it sometimes happens. Fox and Coyotes cannot cross. It is genetically impossible.
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Old 03-04-2015, 11:56 AM
  #22  
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Coydog
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Canidae
Genus: Canis
Species: Canis latrans x Canis lupus familiaris
A coydog is a canid hybrid resulting from a mating between a coyote and a dog. The term is sometimes mistakenly used for coywolves, which are common in northeast North America, whereas true coydogs are only occasionally found in the wild. This is due to the mating cycles of dogs and coyotes not coinciding, and coyotes are usually antagonistic towards dogs, with even captive specimens having shown reluctance to mate with them. Hybridization usually only occurs when coyotes are expanding into areas where conspecifics are few, and dogs are the only alternatives. Even then, pup survival rates are lower than normal, as dogs do not form pair bonds with coyotes, thus making the rearing of pups more difficult. Nevertheless, hybrids of both sexes are fertile, and can be successfully bred through four generations. Such matings have occurred long before the European colonization of the Americas, as melanistic coyotes have been shown to have inherited their black pelts from dogs likely brought to North America through the Bering Land Bridge 12,000 to 14,000 years ago by the ancestors of the America's indigenous people. Coydogs were deliberately bred in Pre-Columbian Mexico, where coyotes were held in high regard. In the city of Teotihuacan, it was common practice to crossbreed coyotes and Mexican gray wolves with dogs in order to breed resistant, loyal but temperamental, and good guardians. Northern Canada's Aboriginal populations were mating coyotes and wolves to their sled dogs in order to produce more resilient animals as late as the early 20th century.
In captivity, F1 hybrids tend to be more mischievous and less manageable as pups than dogs, and are less trustworthy on maturity than wolf-dog hybrids. Hybrids vary in appearance, but generally retain the coyote's adult sable coat color, dark neonatal coat color, bushy tail with an active supracaudal gland, and white facial mask. F1 hybrids tend to be intermediate in form between dogs and coyotes, while F2 hybrids are more varied. Both F1 and F2 hybrids resemble their coyote parents in terms of shyness and intrasexual aggression. Hybrid play behavior includes the coyote "hip-slam". A population of non-albino white coyotes in Newfoundland owe their coloration to a MC1R mutation inherited from golden retrievers.
Some 15% of 10,000 coyotes taken annually in Illinois for their fur during the early 1980s may have been coydogs based on cranial measurements. As the coyote population in Illinois at the time was estimated at 20,000-30,000, this would suggest a population of 3,000-4,500 coydogs in the state. Of 379 wild canid skulls taken in Ohio from 1982 to 1988, 10 (2.6%) were found to be coydogs. It was noted that that "The incidence of coydog hybrids was high only in areas of expanding, widely dispersed coyote populations."


***For those of you that are posting about this subject negatively, please do a google search and do some reading on the subject before you say anything more. There are even pictures of dogs actually coupled with coyotes during copulation on the net and one was in the above article that I just C/Pd here!

Last edited by Topgun 3006; 03-04-2015 at 12:05 PM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 03-04-2015, 12:09 PM
  #23  
Spike
 
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Originally Posted by Topgun 3006 View Post
Coydog
It was noted that that "The incidence of coydog hybrids was high only in areas of expanding, widely dispersed coyote populations."


***For those of you that are posting about this subject negatively, please do a google search and do some reading on the subject before you say anything more. There are even pictures of dogs actually coupled with coyotes during copulation on the net and one was in the above article that I just C/Pd here!
I very much agree with the highlighted portion above.
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Old 03-04-2015, 12:43 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Tyme2Hunt View Post
I do not, but have personally seen one that was definitely crossed with a blue healer. NO DNA NEEDED. This was in Iowa, close to the Mississippi river. I had a rug from a very large Coy dog that was cauht by a friend with trail hounds in SW Missouri many years ago. There was a whole litter of them. That one was crossed with a large breed dog, perhaps a sheperd? The one I had the rug for was black in color, but some of the others seen in that group were different colored. I had the rug in my heated shop for several years. One of my dogs got loose in there and chewed it to pieces. It was torn to the point that I took it to the dump. There was a newspaper article that told of it and showed pictures. The Mo. DNR came to the unlikey conclusion that it was a Texas Red Wolf. Now you must remember that this was many years before DNA was ever heard of. I was given the rug after my friends death, but the newspaper article was never found by his wife. I have personally trapped a 40 pound black coyote. He was a large dominant male and I believe him to be full coyote, but not 100% certain. I also know of a red and black pair of yotes many years ago in this area. I saw them both together one day and put dogs after one of them, but did not harvest either of them. The black one was seen by several others that winter. I do not know whether anyone eventually shot it or not. These were in the begining times for coyotes in our area, so likely could have been coyote/dog crossed. I do have a pelt from a reddish colored coyote that I tanned myself. I caught it with one of my hounds perhaps 20 years ago. It is not the best of shape. Been hanging in my cabin. I'll see if I can take a picture of it. It appears to be full coyote, just colored wrong. That happens in nature. I have an orange colored coon and a coon that is mainly a gray with a snow white tail. I trapped both of those and have both of them mounted.
Thanks for the reply. I used to hunt coyotes quite a bit as well. We would get grey, blond, and reddish colored ones. But I never saw a black one. Though I've seen pictures of ones others have taken.

I did see a blond raccoon once too.

ATB

p.s. In another post you said all humans don't have the same shaped head. Isn't that the truth...

Last edited by Mickey Finn; 03-23-2015 at 10:27 AM.
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Old 03-04-2015, 01:36 PM
  #25  
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Top, if your post was directed at me, I never said coyotes and dogs cold not breed, I said it is rare outside having human help. The idiots in LA are known to tie a domestic bitch in heat up in the foothills hoping a male coyote would breed with them, I wonder how many got killed in the process. This is what I was trying to say more or less and I was not arguing with anyone but refering to the grand scheme of things that it is not common. no argument existed here, just a conversation!


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Do coyotes and dogs interbreed (mate with one another)?







People often speculate as to the frequency of coyote-dog hybrids, or coydogs, in urban settings. Coyotes and dogs are related, and they are biologically capable of producing hybrid litters. Coydogs have been raised in captivity. Genetic surveys of wild coyotes have rarely documented evidence of dogs in the genetic makeup of coyotes, despite domestic dogs and coyotes sharing the continent for the past 9,000 years. Although it is possible, coydogs in urban settings are unlikely because:
•Coyotes are highly seasonal breeders; dogs are not.
•Coydog females have a shifted estrus cycle that does not coincide with the coyote period.
•Domestic dog and coydog males do not tend to litters, whereas male coyotes do.
•Coydogs may have lower fertility than either domestic dogs or coyotes.




















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Old 03-04-2015, 02:12 PM
  #26  
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Oldtimr---I think you know by now that if I wanted to direct a post to just you that I would have done so or put it in a PM!
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:47 PM
  #27  
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OK sorry about that, I didn't see anyone else but me expressing that coydogs are not a common occurance so I took it as being directed at my posts.
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