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House finches...

Old 01-04-2010, 08:21 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Default House finches...

These little terrors are scaring off my yard's local songbird population! Are they legal to shoot, or are they protected by the migratory bird act as well?
P.S. I live in Michigan, as my name says.

Last edited by Michiganhunter16; 01-04-2010 at 08:32 PM.
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Old 01-04-2010, 08:29 PM
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Check your states hunting regulations first, than call the DNR for confirmation. Most likely they are legal to kill.
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Old 01-05-2010, 04:28 AM
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This may help: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.ed...mexicanus.html

It's from UM, and contains links that may clarify your situation. House finches are pretty territorial, but if you hang one of those thistle socks well away from your other feeders they'll pose fewer problems.
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Old 01-05-2010, 01:16 PM
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I shot 6 of those this weekend. They dissappear when you hit em with a .223
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by kyhunter93 View Post
They dissappear when you hit em with a .223
Imagine that.

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Seems not right to put out feed for birds only to kill certain birds you don't like.

I like the idea of feeding them something else away from the main feeder. Only problem is you might lure other birds there too, ruining your entertain of the birds you want to see.

I guess if they need to be thinned out, they need to be thinned out.

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Old 01-06-2010, 03:49 PM
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Thanks everybody, for the answers... But I didn't exactly get a straight answer for the UM website.
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Old 01-06-2010, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by iSnipe View Post
Imagine that.

=================
It's just like magic..
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Old 01-06-2010, 06:21 PM
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They are a songbird and protected.

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Old 01-06-2010, 09:32 PM
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Ahh! I missidentified the bird; it is actually a house SPARROW and NOT a finch. This means that they're a pest species.
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Old 01-07-2010, 04:04 AM
  #10  
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Neither House Finches or House Sparrows pose a problem at bird feeders. At least no worse than any other songbird. Both the House Finch and House Sparrow are protected as they are songbirds. If you can afford hunting equipment, I suggest you spend a couple of bucks on a good bird identification book before you go blasting away. My guess you have English Sparrows which are an invasive species and not protected in most states. Most people cannot tell the difference between a House Finch and a Purple Finch in the winter. The House Sparrow looks nothing like a House Finch. The House Sparrow looks completely different from the English Sparrow. I hope you do a better job of indentifying what you shoot at when you hunt!
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