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scope set at 25 yards help

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scope set at 25 yards help

Old 12-27-2013, 11:13 AM
  #1  
Spike
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Default scope set at 25 yards help

I just set my scope on my Remington 30x6 the scope is a taco 3-9x32 at 25 yards how far should I be money on. I am hope 150 yards is a dead deer. Thanks for any help I am shooting 180 grain bullet
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Old 12-27-2013, 11:34 AM
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How high is the center line of the scope tube above the center line of the bore?
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Old 12-27-2013, 11:40 AM
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Man I have no clue this is my first gun with a scope. I took it this morning to the gun shop for a bore sight and come home and shot it and it was no where close to the target. But I have it locked it at 25 yards I read at 100 yards I should be 2 inches high
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Old 12-27-2013, 11:52 AM
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Its hard to say with only shooting at 25 yds.

BUT, if we asume a few things, such as a velocity of 2700 fps, a ballistic coefficient of .241 (round nose bullet) and a scope height of 2" over the bore, you could use the following data:

25 yds - 0.4 inches low.
50 yds - 0.8 inches high.
100 yds - 2.2 inches high.
150 yds - 2 inches high.
200 yds - 0.

Note that the numbers above indicate the bullet should be hitting almost a half-inch low at 25 yds to get these results. You really should shoot the gun out to 100 yds at least to confirm where it is hitting.

But to answer your question, if the gun is truly hitting dead on at 25 yds, it will be about 4.5 inches high at 150 yds.
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Old 12-27-2013, 11:53 AM
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Get a ruler and measure up from center of barrel to center of scope.
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Old 12-27-2013, 04:57 PM
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As was mentioned above, sighting in is not guesswork at what a gun will shoot at distances past where you shoot it initially. Always shoot it out to at least 100 or 200 yards BEFORE you ever pull the trigger on an animal so you know exactly what it's doing at those longer distances.
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Old 12-27-2013, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by UncleNorby View Post
Its hard to say with only shooting at 25 yds.

BUT, if we asume a few things, such as a velocity of 2700 fps, a ballistic coefficient of .241 (round nose bullet) and a scope height of 2" over the bore, you could use the following data:

25 yds - 0.4 inches low.
50 yds - 0.8 inches high.
100 yds - 2.2 inches high.
150 yds - 2 inches high.
200 yds - 0.

Note that the numbers above indicate the bullet should be hitting almost a half-inch low at 25 yds to get these results. You really should shoot the gun out to 100 yds at least to confirm where it is hitting.

But to answer your question, if the gun is truly hitting dead on at 25 yds, it will be about 4.5 inches high at 150 yds.

Did you really mean to say the scope is 2 inches over the bore? Sounds pretty high to me. Isn't a half inch more typical?
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Old 12-28-2013, 04:43 AM
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Originally Posted by bdan68 View Post
Did you really mean to say the scope is 2 inches over the bore? Sounds pretty high to me. Isn't a half inch more typical?
If you measure, the two points are the center of the bore and the center of the scope (line of sight). Most trajectory charts use a standard 1.5". Unless you have "see through" mounts or high rings (needed to mount very large objective lens scopes) your measurement is going to be very close to the standard of 1.5".
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Old 12-28-2013, 04:49 AM
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As mentioned before actual shooting is the only way to be sure that the rifle is sighted correctly. There are too many variables to do otherwise.
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Old 12-28-2013, 06:15 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by Big Uncle View Post
If you measure, the two points are the center of the bore and the center of the scope (line of sight). Most trajectory charts use a standard 1.5". Unless you have "see through" mounts or high rings (needed to mount very large objective lens scopes) your measurement is going to be very close to the standard of 1.5".
1 1/2 inches! Yeah that's what I meant!
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