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The utter immorality of the War on (some) Drugs

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The utter immorality of the War on (some) Drugs

Old 04-04-2013, 01:52 PM
  #21  
LBR
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Sure is... can you say there isn't a war on tobacco in this country?
Hmmm....it's legal, it brings in a ton of tax dollars...but how many of those dollars are spent on treating the problems caused by it and trying to get people to quit?

No one should drink and drive, it isn't legal... but every day someone gets behind the wheel. It doesn't have to make sense.
Good thing, because there's no way it can make sense. Cigs are bad, drinking is bad, so let's go ahead and add another product to the list, because????

I've never met a violent/crazed person that only did pot...
Neither have I. I have no experience with someone getting drunk and getting mean. I've never had someone rob me to fund a heroin or cocaine habit. Never had an acid freak or meth head go nuts on me either. Therefore we should make it all legal? Think of the man-hours saved and the tax dollars we could drag in, not to mention all that personal freedom.

There are scores of people in prison for pot,...
Really? Posession is generally a misdemeanor. I'll ask my brother--who is the Master Sergeant at our county jail--how many people are incarcerated for pot around here.

...revenue would increase undoubtedly in my mind,...
Of course it would. So would spending to address the problems it causes. Like I said, same as cigs, casinos, etc.

Either way, it comes down to personal freedom.
How about prostitution? That's another "victimless" crime. Other drugs? Polygamy? etc etc etc
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Old 04-04-2013, 02:27 PM
  #22  
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Hmmm....it's legal, it brings in a ton of tax dollars...but how many of those dollars are spent on treating the problems caused by it and trying to get people to quit?
So they pay for a taxed product, and you're dismissing legalizing it because some of that money might go to helping them fight their addiction?

Marijuana can have a psychological addiction affect like the internet or gambling, but it's not as strong or common as alcohol dependency (about 15% who drink vs. about 10% for pot). They also appear to share common genes that affect if the person is likely to get addicted or not.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20028363

Good thing, because there's no way it can make sense. Cigs are bad, drinking is bad, so let's go ahead and add another product to the list, because????
It's not working at all?

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/47729476/

More teens smoke pot than cigarettes, CDC says

If you drink alcohol beverages, then you're being hypocritical.

Neither have I. I have no experience with someone getting drunk and getting mean. I've never had someone rob me to fund a heroin or cocaine habit. Never had an acid freak or meth head go nuts on me either. Therefore we should make it all legal? Think of the man-hours saved and the tax dollars we could drag in, not to mention all that personal freedom.
Stereotypes tend to have some truth to them.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ve-drunks.html

Really? Posession is generally a misdemeanor. I'll ask my brother--who is the Master Sergeant at our county jail--how many people are incarcerated for pot around here.
http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr...rsons-arrested

One marijuana arrest every 42 seconds and one drug arrest every 21 seconds in the U.S.

Of course it would. So would spending to address the problems it causes. Like I said, same as cigs, casinos, etc.
Obviously it would. There's tons of police and correctional officers who only have their self-interest in mind and would not want to see their unnecessary jobs being taken away. Making marijuana illegal also prevents industrial hemp from being grown.

Last edited by BigBuck22; 04-04-2013 at 02:36 PM.
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Old 04-04-2013, 02:42 PM
  #23  
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I have to wonder though if weed maybe does affect your brain. I mean like, why would someone keep risking jail time and a criminal record just to get high, unless their thinking is kind of muddled?
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Old 04-04-2013, 03:08 PM
  #24  
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I mean like, why would someone keep risking jail time and a criminal record just to get high, unless their thinking is kind of muddled?
No fair--you are using logic and common sense!

So they pay for a taxed product, and you're dismissing legalizing it because some of that money might go to helping them fight their addiction?
You have already proven your total inability to carry on an honest conversation, further emphasized by the above. I seen no point in trying to carry on an honest conversation with someone who isn't honest. Before it starts, the parts where you said I'm "dismissing it because some of the money might be used to help them fight their addicition."

First, that was only one of many problems I listed, not the only one as you imply. Second, there's no "might". But anyway...I have better things to do.
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Old 04-04-2013, 03:30 PM
  #25  
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Yep, heres a TX size dope bust:

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/...191437976.html
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Old 04-04-2013, 03:47 PM
  #26  
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Unfortunately, mj has been demonized more heavily than ARs and high-capacity mags... the influence of propaganda is hard to ignore.

It's a plant, it's been used for a few thousand years that we know of and it's not going to go away.

I'm out on this thread, but did enjoy the conversation.
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Old 04-04-2013, 04:35 PM
  #27  
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I have to wonder though if weed maybe does affect your brain. I mean like, why would someone keep risking jail time and a criminal record just to get high, unless their thinking is kind of muddled?
Why would people procrastinate, not do homework, not brush their teeth, not wear deodorant, drive while recently drinking, text in a car, etc.? It's nothing new.

Originally Posted by LBR View Post
You have already proven your total inability to carry on an honest conversation, further emphasized by the above. I seen no point in trying to carry on an honest conversation with someone who isn't honest. Before it starts, the parts where you said I'm "dismissing it because some of the money might be used to help them fight their addicition."

First, that was only one of many problems I listed, not the only one as you imply.
You acted as if it was best that no money would have gone towards anti-drug programs if we didn't tax the drugs. After all, if it's taxed and spent on anti-drug programs, then it is effectively freeing up money that would have gone towards it if the drug wasn't taxed.

Second, there's no "might". But anyway...I have better things to do.
LOL I don't have the time to look at all the states, but here's some info:

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2010/10/0...ax-money-goes/

"Almost all of that revenue goes into the state’s general fund. Not a penny is earmarked for anti-smoking, so the state’s Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program is funded at whatever level lawmakers decide."

http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/loc...cc4c002e0.html

"Starting Thursday, smokers with health insurance who call the state Quit Line for help kicking their habit will get less help, the result of a 55 percent cut in state funding to smoking cessation and anti-smoking programs.

In spite of soaring state cigarette taxes, the Quit Line's funding was slashed by two-thirds - from $3.7 million a year to $1.2 million - as part of the broad cuts implemented in the 2009-11 budget signed by Gov. Jim Doyle to help solve the state's massive deficit. Total funding for anti-tobacco programs was cut from $15.3 million a year to $6.9 million.

The cuts follow a 75-cent increase in the cigarette tax on Sept. 1 that brought the state tax to $2.52 per pack, and also follows a $1-per-pack increase in 2008 - moves made to help solve budget deficits."
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Old 04-04-2013, 09:39 PM
  #28  
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It's an interesting topic to discuss. The OP mentioned "some drugs" but marijuana is the only drug that seems to be the focal point of this discussion.

A few points to consider about marijuana are:

http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2012/0...of-collisions/
A CNN article in which 9 studies with over 50,000 participants documented that using marijuana and driving nearly doubles the risk of collisions. I'm guessing a few members will be disappointed that they didn't get to participate in the study and receive free marijuana.

http://q13fox.com/2012/12/18/driver-...#axzz2PZ0puzGe
A article documenting a driver under the influence of marijuana arrested for a fatal DUI with marijuana.

http://missoulian.com/special-sectio...cc4c002e0.html
A Missouri man convicted of a fatal DUI while stoned (with his kids in the back seat no less).
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Old 04-04-2013, 10:51 PM
  #29  
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A few points to consider about marijuana are:

http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2012/0...of-collisions/
A CNN article in which 9 studies with over 50,000 participants documented that using marijuana and driving nearly doubles the risk of collisions. I'm guessing a few members will be disappointed that they didn't get to participate in the study and receive free marijuana.
Did you read my stat in the other thread? There is no consensus on the risk of marijuana because of the different methodologies and inconsistencies. Here's another credible link saying as much.

http://adai.uw.edu/marijuana/factsheets/driving.htm

"Although research examining this issue has gained momentum in recent years, the picture remains muddied by inconsistent findings and methodologies."

While the one you site says twice as much, there are others that have said it's just slightly higher or similar to the general population.

Lets put this in perspective, too. Texting increases the risk of a crash 23 times or so. Alcohol increases the risk of a fatal crash for each sex as follows:

http://www.michigan.gov/sos/0,4670,7...4488--,00.html

"Male teenage drivers with a BAC of 0.05 or more are 18 times more likely than a sober male teen driver to be killed in a single vehicle crash. Female teen drivers are 54 times more likely to be killed in a crash than their sober counterparts."

Here's some more facts that help put it into perspective.

http://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafet...factsheet.html

"The annual cost of alcohol-related crashes totals more than $51 billion.

Drugs other than alcohol (e.g., marijuana and cocaine) are involved in about 18% of motor vehicle driver deaths. These other drugs are often used in combination with alcohol.5"

http://well.wvu.edu/articles/the_hig...ng_and_driving

"More than 40 percent of all fatal auto accidents are alcohol-related.

Auto accidents are the greatest single cause of death for young people between the ages of six and 27. Almost half of these accidents involve alcohol."


http://q13fox.com/2012/12/18/driver-...#axzz2PZ0puzGe
A article documenting a driver under the influence of marijuana arrested for a fatal DUI with marijuana.
"Police said the victim was close to two different lit and controlled intersections, but chose to step out into the middle of traffic, which would clearly put him at fault.

However, because Rowles was believed to be under the influence of marijuana, Washington State law would mean he is technically at fault, according to police."

That's not a good example.

http://missoulian.com/special-sectio...cc4c002e0.html
A Missouri man convicted of a fatal DUI while stoned (with his kids in the back seat no less).
Many of the examples in there showed they had marijuana and alcohol or marijuana and other drugs.

Last edited by BigBuck22; 04-04-2013 at 11:21 PM.
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Old 04-05-2013, 03:22 AM
  #30  
LBR
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Good stuff Cal. One would have to be a mental midget to think pot doesn't impair your thinking, motor skills, judgment, etc.

But making it legal will free up so many LEO's........sure it will. Like making alcohol legal has made it a non-issue for LEO's...
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