Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > Non Hunting > Politics
ethnic classes.... >

ethnic classes....

Politics Nothing goes with politics quite like crying and complaining, and we're a perfect example of that.

ethnic classes....

Old 05-13-2010, 03:39 AM
  #11  
Little Doe Peep
 
sachiko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Japan
Posts: 14,945
Talking

Originally Posted by boysda View Post
isn't "ethnic studies" something best left to the judgment of an individual teacher? doesn't seem to me to lend itself well to either promotion by specific curriculum, or by legislation. a good history teacher with 70% latino students in a class should be able to focus the broader lessons in a way to relate to the audience being taught.
I'm of Japanese descent but I don't see where our history here in the United States is any different for me than for any other American. If I were attending school in Japan, I would expect an emphasis on Japanese history. But this is the United States, not Japan, Mexico, Africa, etc.



How about "The Role of the Sheep in the History of Western Civilization?"
sachiko is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 05:13 AM
  #12  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 3,248
Default

Originally Posted by daddyslittlegirl View Post
I'm of Japanese descent but I don't see where our history here in the United States is any different for me than for any other American. If I were attending school in Japan, I would expect an emphasis on Japanese history. But this is the United States, not Japan, Mexico, Africa, etc.



How about "The Role of the Sheep in the History of Western Civilization?"
true, but were i a history teacher, teaching a course on modern U.S. history to a class with a significant portion of students of japanese ancestry, i would make it a point of highlighting the contributions of the 442nd infantry in the european theatre. similarly, if i were teaching a course on the civil war to a bunch of redheads, i would probably focus a little on the role the irish brigade(s) played in both the union and confederate armies. seems to me if you can make a student personally relate to the subject, you have a better chance of keeping them interested in the subject.
boysda is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 06:27 AM
  #13  
Dominant Buck
 
Fieldmouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 37,721
Default

Originally Posted by boysda View Post
true, but were i a history teacher, teaching a course on modern U.S. history to a class with a significant portion of students of japanese ancestry, i would make it a point of highlighting the contributions of the 442nd infantry in the european theatre. similarly, if i were teaching a course on the civil war to a bunch of redheads, i would probably focus a little on the role the irish brigade(s) played in both the union and confederate armies. seems to me if you can make a student personally relate to the subject, you have a better chance of keeping them interested in the subject.
and I guess skip all that use less stuff like the Founding Fathers, Revolution, the Constitution and Delclaration if Independence. After all, what matters most is a student's self esteem.
Fieldmouse is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 07:16 AM
  #14  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Garfield NJ USA
Posts: 3,067
Default

This has been going on for a long time now. Teaching the Socialist agenda or should I say indoctrination. The progressives have rewritten history to teach what they want you to know. Not what the actual history is.
thndrchiken is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 07:52 AM
  #15  
Giant Nontypical
Thread Starter
 
bergall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 7,626
Default

Originally Posted by thndrchiken View Post
This has been going on for a long time now. Teaching the Socialist agenda or should I say indoctrination. The progressives have rewritten history to teach what they want you to know. Not what the actual history is.
this is true...and it looks like Arizona is 'taking steps' to keep the B.S. to a more acceptable level...
bergall is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 07:59 AM
  #16  
Boone & Crockett
 
Lanse couche couche's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Southwest Ohio
Posts: 10,277
Default

As someone who has both taken and taught some classes that are essentially Ethnic Studies, i can state that they are a two-edged sword. Any well-rounded, objective treatment of an ethnic group's experience in the U.S. is gonna have to include negative experiences on their part whether it be predjudice and discrimination toward Mid-19th century Irish Immigrants or treatment of Blacks and Hispanics. An essential part of any ethnic identity is gonna be that group's interactions and experiences with "mainstream" society and other ethnic groups. An important aspect of a college education is one where people are presented with "warts and all" perspectives on issues and are challenged to think critically and to explore beyond their individual beliefs and perspectives. Some people are uncomfortable with that kind of exposure and can be outright hostile towards it. But sorry, there is not much you can do to put an entirely good paint job on topics like the Native American experience in the U.S. To try to do that is simply bad scholarship and self-delusional and puts me in mind of the so-called scholarship produced under the Nazi and Communist regimes.

On the other hand, some ethnic studies classes can be taught by people who are pretty much hostile and radical and want to focus entirely on the negative in a manner that puts me in mind of so-called scholarship produced under Nazi and Communist regimes.

Dunno exactly what is being taught in those Arizona classes, so cant really comment other than to make the observation that it is often better to err on the side of academic freedom until facts dictate otherwise.
Lanse couche couche is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 08:01 AM
  #17  
Giant Nontypical
Thread Starter
 
bergall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 7,626
Default

Originally Posted by boysda View Post
true, but were i a history teacher, teaching a course on modern U.S. history to a class with a significant portion of students of japanese ancestry, i would make it a point of highlighting the contributions of the 442nd infantry in the european theatre. similarly, if i were teaching a course on the civil war to a bunch of redheads, i would probably focus a little on the role the irish brigade(s) played in both the union and confederate armies. seems to me if you can make a student personally relate to the subject, you have a better chance of keeping them interested in the subject.
and playing to your audience is 'performance 101'. As in your suggestions below, you look like you can do it POSITIVELY rather than telling the Japanese kids how they were victimized by anti-asian sentiment in the USA when the 442nd was sent into combat...or how
the Irish were scorned by the Germans who were already in this country ahead of them and how this country used them like a set of cheap tools....there's a RIGHT WAY to teach, and there's a WRONG WAY to teach. I believe Arizona is taking the initiative to ensure a public education stays on track. Now I can only hope that they mandate American History as a requisite course.

Funny thing....I saw one of the 'minority kids' on TV this morning crying about her loss of self-esteem because of the cancellation of some ethnic-studies classes. Looks like the minorities are raising some very delicate kids with very frail egos...what's with that ? Somebody should tell this blubbering moron she can take that trash in college, but she's gotta get out of high school first. Oh and nobody said she's less of a human being because of what she is (in her words, 'darker than most'), they just cancelled a program of study which, by the way, is not necessary to graduate HS. Better she can read and write and explain the American flag than recite all the presidents of Peru.
bergall is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 09:05 AM
  #18  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 626
Default

A good teacher would use the history of the 442'nd Infantry as an opportunity to show the complexity of our country's behavior since its founding illustrating in an objective manner both the good and the bad and most importantly it is rarely either completely one or the other. Our Government was guilty of a terrible injustice when it interred Japanese Americans. On the other hand it gave the internees an opportunity to show their loyalty and trusted them enough to arm volunteers and train them as soldiers to fight for the United States. The men of the 442nd fought heroically for America even though they knew their family and friends were being held in interment camps. Finally, after many years our country admitted it had acted unjustly and formally apologized and made at least token restitution payments to Japanese Americans who had actually been interred but not their offspring born after the war who had not been personally victimized.

It would show our country as one that is not immune from treating people unfairly but in the end tries to make things right.
Lemaitre is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 09:14 AM
  #19  
Giant Nontypical
Thread Starter
 
bergall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 7,626
Default

Originally Posted by Lemaitre View Post
A good teacher would use the history of the 442'nd Infantry as an opportunity to show the complexity of our country's behavior since its founding illustrating in an objective manner both the good and the bad and most importantly it is rarely either completely one or the other. Our Government was guilty of a terrible injustice when it interred Japanese Americans. On the other hand it gave the internees an opportunity to show their loyalty and trusted them enough to arm volunteers and train them as soldiers to fight for the United States. The men of the 442nd fought heroically for America even though they knew their family and friends were being held in interment camps. Finally, after many years our country admitted it had acted unjustly and formally apologized and made at least token restitution payments to Japanese Americans who had actually been interred but not their offspring born after the war who had not been personally victimized.

It would show our country as one that is not immune from treating people unfairly but in the end tries to make things right.

And again, another attempt to portray the country fairly and without bias. That's NOT what's going on, at least not in the Latin American studies classes.......

Oh and by the way....did'ja hear ? Christopher Colombus is an evil vile and hateful person because of what happened in the New World after his discovery...I tell 'ya...ya' can't make this stuff up .
bergall is offline  
Old 05-13-2010, 09:28 AM
  #20  
Boone & Crockett
 
Lanse couche couche's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Southwest Ohio
Posts: 10,277
Default

Actually, one of Columbus's actions in the New World was to kidnap a number of Natives to take to Spain to put on display. Think that the early enslavement of Indians pretty much occurred on his watch. So, I wouldnt blame Native Americans for seeing him as a villain. But, at the same time, I can understand why he is a hero for many, especially Italian-Americans. Good scholarship strives for a balance between those competing perspective on the same person/events, etc.
Lanse couche couche is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.