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Bush honeysuckle IL

Old 03-01-2010, 07:52 PM
  #1  
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Default Bush honeysuckle IL

Was just wondering who all on here was having problems with Bush honeysuckle invading there place? and youre thoughts on it? I have it everywhere and have been waging a slow war on it. it grows so thick you would think it was good for deer but it seems to choke out everything in a few years and then the deer start to avoid it. just wondering who has it? whos trying to kill it? whos leaving it?
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Old 03-04-2010, 07:30 AM
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Is Bush honeysuckle some new species. I am actually trying to get honeysuckle to grow on one portion of my land for cover for small game.
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Old 03-04-2010, 08:31 PM
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no its not new its been here for a while. bush honeysuckle is a tree/shrub its the first thing to green up in the spring and the last to drop in the fall, and it produces lots of red berries which is how it reseeds everywhere. it is very invasive. Regular honeysuckle is a vine. its still invasive but easier to control as long as u manage it.
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Old 03-05-2010, 06:11 AM
  #4  
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Hmm, you learn something new every day. I dont recall seeing any of the bush honeysuckle. Been around the vine stuff all my life and have never really seen people having problems with it in southeastern Illinois.
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:21 AM
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Go to your local NRCS office and enroll your property into one of the programs that will provide cost share dollars to help remove it. I have my ground in EQIP and WHIP. Both programs provide cost share money (WHIP is a 75% cost share) to pay someone to kill it. One is Federal and one is State funded. They will not overlap. I can't explain why I am in both. It just worked out that way. They are great programs though. You can make out of them what you wish to accomplish with you property.

I hate the stuff and anyone trying to start it should not do it. Talk to a local biologist and plant something native to your area.
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Old 03-21-2010, 08:58 AM
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Heres a tool to remove them. http://www.misterhoneysuckle.com/pag...t/trouble.html
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Old 04-08-2010, 07:05 PM
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Demo92,
I deal with controlling honeysuckle as part of my profession. Just a few things "Bush honeysuckle" is a native to the northern part of the US. What I think you're refering to is Exotic Honeysuckle species, sometimes refered to as Bush Honeysuckles. The best and cheapest way of controlling larger shrubs, anything 8 feet or more, is to cut them off with a chainsaw about several inches from the ground and treat the stumps with a 50/50 mixture of 41% Roundup and water. Make sure that you treat all of the stems. By adding die to the mixture, you can see what you've treated easier. This can be done anytime of the year, except during the spring growth period when the sap is flowing upward. For shrubs 8 foot or less, you can spray the foliage with a 6 oz per gallon mixture of 41% Roundup mixed with water. Just use a hand held spayer and spray a fine mist on at least 80% of the foliage. The best time to do this is during the fall after most other native species have dropped their leaves and honeysuckle is still very green. In order for this or any other control program to be effective, consecutive years of treatment is needed. I would monitor the infestation yearly untill it is under control of gone. Hope this info helps, I've had amazing success using the above mentioned methods.
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Old 04-23-2010, 07:19 AM
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Old 08-05-2010, 07:41 PM
  #9  
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It sounds like you're talking about what we call "Autumn Olive" not sure what its really called, but your description sounds like the same thing. This stuff is worse than kudzu because it gets pretty "woody" really fast. Small to medium bushes, I just hit with roundup and let em go. The really big ones, I hit with round up, and then come in and do as carl1191 suggested. Good luck, and dont let up. We've been at it for about 10 years and we're about to gain on it.
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