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browning t-bolt trigger

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Old 05-12-2011, 08:04 AM
  #1  
Spike
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Default browning t-bolt trigger

I have a new production browning t-bolt 22lr =, synthetic stock. neat little gun, performs flawlessly. The trigger is adjustable, but only to around 3lbs. Had a local gunsmith look at it, and he said he would rather not mess with the trigger - had never seen one like it.
Anyway, I would like to get trigger pull decreased by at least another pound. Anyone (especially browning specialists) have any ideas. Would be willing to send it to competent gunsmith if necessary.
Thanks for any input.
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Old 05-13-2011, 06:18 PM
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Nontypical Buck
 
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It shouldn't be too hard to clip a coil to a coil & 1/2 off the trigger spring to lighten the pull weight. Be VERY careful & go slow as it's a LOT easier to cut more off than it is to put it back. Just don't clip so much off you make it dangerous or unreliable.
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Old 03-03-2014, 06:37 AM
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Ancient thread, but Timney is talking about making a trigger for T-bolt. Pester them some and maybe they'll hurry up.

Inside of a T-bolt trigger is complicated and every adjustment inside affects all the other adjustments so be sure you understand all the relationships b4 you start lopping off coils.
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Old 03-07-2014, 09:31 AM
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IMHO that's just another accident waiting to happen when people with no knowledge of a system are told just do this or that as it's every simple to fix!Unless the gun is used in bench restcompetition, I can't see why it needs to be below 3# in the first place if it's not designed to be adjustable below what it is now. The gunsmith he took it to used some good common sense in not working on it and possibly making himself liable in case of an unintended discharge due to improper work on it.

Last edited by Topgun 3006; 03-07-2014 at 09:33 AM.
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Old 03-09-2014, 10:44 AM
  #5  
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It's a well proven principle that if an expert in the mechanical interworkings of a given machine has concluded it to be unfruitive, then the best option is for an inexperienced person to take a crack at it.

This is the kind of bad advice that gave the Remington triggers such a bad wrap, improper trigger jobs and improper adjustment rendered the triggers unsafe. You wouldn't take one of the wheels off of your truck to improve your gas mileage, it's not designed to work that way.
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