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Danger of gun blow up. What models

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Danger of gun blow up. What models

Old 09-28-2016, 06:29 AM
  #1  
Spike
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Default Danger of gun blow up. What models

My father left my husband his gun collection from the 40's-60's. Most of them have never been used recently. Our son is now interested in using some of these guns and I feel like I was once told about one of them being a danger of blowing up. I am trying to get an idea of which one it could be. Is there an official list of problem guns? These are shotguns and rifles.
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Old 09-28-2016, 07:09 AM
  #2  
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If there is some doubt on the history then bringing them all to a competent gun smith might be a smart idea. That would be short money spent to ensure they all won't hurt anyone.
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Old 09-28-2016, 09:35 AM
  #3  
Nontypical Buck
 
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There aren't really lists of models at risk, but since you said "collection," there might be some easily identified TYPES of firearms which might not be safe to fire with modern proofed ammunition.

Best bet is to take it to a professional gunsmith, or contact a local NRA firearms instructor, to have them take a look at what you have and give advice on which might fall into that category.

Spitballing a bit - Damascus steel barrels used in very old shotguns are much weaker than modern barrels (modern in the relative sense), so that's usually the most common "don't shoot this 'cuz it might blow up" type of firearm most people will handle in their life. These barrels were made by wrapping straps of steel around a mandrel and hammer forging - hence Damascus - which leaves them much weaker than modern bored barrels. Another common mode would be Springfield Trapdoor rifles in 45-70. Given a good inspection, they are typically safe to fire, but only with standard low pressure rounds, and not with higher pressure rounds intended for more modern rifle designs.

If you'd post up a list of the makes and models, some of us might be able to help sort this out with you. The challenge there being some of the older models which would be most at risk may not have brand and model sufficiently marked.

However, if there was some injurious event which happened to any of them, even a like new, modern model may not be safe for use. So if you don't figure out any model which might be specifically not up to snuff, you may want to have your son pick out which he really wants to shoot, and have it checked out at a smith.
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Old 09-28-2016, 12:09 PM
  #4  
Typical Buck
 
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Like Nomercy and Champlain, I recommend taking the guns he's interested in to a competent gunsmith to have them inspected.
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Old 09-28-2016, 12:52 PM
  #5  
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If you posted a list of what you have we might be able to point you in a possible direction. but your best bet is to have someone look at them all.
-Jake
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Old 09-28-2016, 03:54 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by Champlain Islander View Post
If there is some doubt on the history then bringing them all to a competent gun smith might be a smart idea. That would be short money spent to ensure they all won't hurt anyone.
Some gunsmith will examine them for free. It wouldn't hurt if only for your piece of mind.
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Old 09-28-2016, 07:35 PM
  #7  
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some of the larger chain like store will give a QUICK once over at times, BUT keep in mind, some stores have dummys behind the counters too
a GOOD gun smith is the safest route and they will charge due to they will invest there time and MAKE sure its safe, not just say UP< GO ahead and shoot it!

they will find any flaws or NONE and tell you

ALSO< on a different note
IF you also got ammo, that too can be a question to think about as IF was reloaded and certain calibers were form fired for just ONE gun he has, and all
they might NOT function in other SAME caliber rifles or guns
I am guessing if this person was into guns, they were most likely into reloading too

AMMO can be dangerous too!

I would also suggest you learn how to STORE guns to keep them from being ruined by moisture and handling them
be a shame to have good quality valuable guns get ruined just cause you didn;t know any better!
some guns can be worth a LOT of money, even one's that don't look like much, or are rusty or??
so, having a GOOD smith look over and tell you what you have and value's maybe, might be a worth while investment for you!
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Old 09-28-2016, 09:42 PM
  #8  
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I'd get a gunsmith to look them all over. But in the 90s I got a notice from Remington that the barrel on my 870 could blow. That was the last time I used that gun...
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Old 09-29-2016, 03:16 AM
  #9  
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If one of them is a Winchester Model 100 auto loader make sure the firing pin recall replaced the firing pin.
My brothers ended up in 148 pieces we could find when it blew up before they recalled them.


Al
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Old 09-30-2016, 04:20 AM
  #10  
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You guys are scaring her.
Aside from the possibility of a damascus barreled shotgun, Any modern firearm in good condition, fired with the correct intended ammunition is not going to spontaneously explode.
That said, a list of the makes and models would put the speculation to rest.
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