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Light trigger safety

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Light trigger safety

Old 09-14-2015, 02:49 AM
  #1  
Typical Buck
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Default Light trigger safety

I responded in a previous post about my comfort with a 2 lb trigger for hunting but woke up this morning wondering if i am missing a point as it relates to safety and light triggers, in other words, what is the risk? In my mind, i feel like i know the answer and it is the possibility of it going off unintentionally bc you were on the trigger but not ready to fire. A light trigger can contribute to this. I am comfortable with my ability to handle this risk but is there more to be concerned with?

Personally, i have about 40 yrs of firearms experience so my confidence in handling weapons in a safe manner is high, but, decided it wouldn't hurt to see if i am missing something.

Btw, i understand the need to thoroughly test the effectivness of the safety when adj the trigger by slamming the bolt shut, banging the butt a few times, etc, all while unloaded of course

Last edited by tealboy; 09-14-2015 at 03:15 AM.
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Old 09-14-2015, 03:40 AM
  #2  
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None of my guns in the past have had lightened triggers. From what I read, 2.5-3 lbs. is optimal w/hunting firearms. What if you are hunting w/your lightened trigger and you were going through brush and the trigger were snagged causing a discharge? Seems like a few extra oz.'s of trigger pull are worth the extra margin of safety. With what I've used to me, a 3 lb. trigger would be a joy. I'll leave the slipping, falling, dropping the weapon causing discharge to others and keep watching-like yourself- to see what the more experienced on this matter have to say.
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Old 09-14-2015, 04:27 AM
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I have all my Rifle triggers set at 2 pounds except the Winchester 94's and three 22lg, & mag.
Have never had a problem with them. Keep my grubby finger off the trigger till I am ready to shoot and never move the safety till ready also. Never carry my rifles so a bush can snag the safety or triggers either.

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Old 09-14-2015, 04:36 AM
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As I posted in your other thread. Some guns when the trigger is lightened up too much, could potentially fire when the bolt is cycled hard. I've seen that before on a friends Rem 700. Most folks seem to like around 2.5lbs, and usually that is plenty safe from what I've seen.
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Old 09-14-2015, 05:33 AM
  #5  
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2.5 to 3.5 pounds works for me.
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Old 09-14-2015, 08:23 AM
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The problem with a 2 pound trigger isn't so much a mechanical issue, I.E. hard bolt work or brush and such. The problem with them is weather and field conditions. When hunting cold weather, most don't take off their glove to shoot. The "feel" of a 2 pound trigger just got lighter! Get a big buck in the scope, the "feel" just got lighter because of an adrenaline dump. All kinds of situations out there that can make that trigger break before you fully intended it with a very light trigger. Field conditions= shooting offhand in the standing or kneeling position for most so you take safety off, then completely "settle" your crosshairs then fire. It's during that "settling" that some accidentally set off a light trigger. Unlike at the bench or range where you have time to take a breath, relax yourself, ease out a breath, squeeze, in the field there may be only a few seconds to bring everything together to get a shot on a buck of a lifetime.
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Old 09-14-2015, 08:45 AM
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I don't tend to care what anyone else does, as it pertains to my safety, I'll reserve the luxury of determining my own safety.

There's a big difference in a "safe" trigger and a "secure" trigger. Certain firearm designs do, indeed, become insecure - often called "unsafe" - when the spring weight is reduced too much, the sear engagement is no longer secure. In these instances, if you run the bolt too hard, jar the rifle, etc, it may fire, uncontrollably and unintentionally.

The only disadvantage of hunting with a hyperlight - yet SECURE - trigger is finger sensation. If you're hunting in the cold and wearing gloves, then you might not feel the pressure of your glove against the trigger. If you're hunting in the cold and NOT wearing gloves, then you run the risk of having slightly desensitized fingertips, so again, you might not feel the pressure of your finger against the trigger. Having a trigger that doesn't function the way the shooter intends is not safe, even if you could drop it out of a 3 story window with the safety off and not fire.

I tend to like a 1.5-2lb trigger for hunting, but do have a couple rifles that are under that mark. Same trigger weight in rifles and revolvers.

However, I would mention that I'm also a huge 2 stage trigger fan. If I could find 2 stage triggers for all of my firearm models, I would have them. That lets me pull up a 3-4lb total weight with a nice and light sub-2lb break. But I can't find myself tolerant of 4lb single stage triggers.

Insecure triggers/sears are dangerous. Improperly sprung triggers can fire when the safety is released, the bolt is closed or opened, when the bolt is ran too hard, when the rifle is bumped or jarred or dropped... etc etc etc... The only real way to test it would be to put it through the same type of conditions that it might experience in an accident. Turn down the trigger, and drop it 30ft - repeatedly - out of a treestand. I tend to prefer NOT doing that to my rifles, so I don't do that kind of testing. To do exhaustive testing to ensure the security of your mechanism, well, frankly, the average hunter just isn't properly equipped.
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Old 09-14-2015, 09:13 AM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by Game Stalker View Post
Seems like a few extra oz.'s of trigger pull are worth the extra margin of safety.
+1

All my guns are set at 3lbs.

I can understand a "set trigger" which is set lighter or as Nomercy recommends a 2 stage trigger where the "break" is lighter.

Disclosure - For me a 2 stage trigger seems like a trigger with a lot of take-up / "creep"; although I understand the purpose for tactical applications.

Each to their own...................

I would like to know if I am walking in /out with another hunter who has a light trigger, if they like to keep one in their chamber (I'll walk behind him) - for me safety in paramount !!!

Last edited by Sheridan; 09-14-2015 at 03:42 PM.
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Old 09-14-2015, 02:51 PM
  #9  
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A variety of very good points, probably the thing that jumped out that i hadnt considered is the issue arising from wearing gloves. I live and hunt florida, i dont hunt with gloves, �� but can totally appreciate the point.

When my new 2 lb spring arrives, i will be testing the sear and safety thoroughly, just like i did with my remington 6 years ago but assuming that tests out ok, i remain comfortable with the 2 lb setting but my test a 2.5 lb setting to see if i can live with it as an added margin. I do know that any time i pick up the remington and dry fire it, i always say, man do i love that trigger.
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Old 09-15-2015, 03:51 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by tealboy View Post

When my new 2 lb spring arrives, i will be testing the sear and safety thoroughly, just like i did with my remington 6 years ago but assuming that tests out ok, i remain comfortable with the 2 lb setting but my test a 2.5 lb setting to see if i can live with it as an added margin. I do know that any time i pick up the remington and dry fire it, i always say, man do i love that trigger.
I put Timney springs in my A-bolt several years ago. There were 2 or 3 springs in the package, all different tensions. I tried all of them and settled on the one the felt best. A 2 lb spring in your gun might be 1.8 in mine. Temperature could also change the pull weight.
Like has been said previously, there's a lot of difference between a trigger that feels good at the bench (or dry firing) and a trigger that works well in the woods.
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