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.22 vs all other

Old 12-05-2008, 05:06 PM
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Default .22 vs all other

I am not a ballistics expert, buy obviously my 18 year old son is. How far will a .22LR travel accurately? I know there are a lot of variables, but just for the sake of satisfying him. How far will a .243, .308, 7mm, 7.62 travel under the same conditions? If there are some charts on the net somewhere, please forward the link. Also, explain what makes one round travel farther than the other. I guess sometimes it is more believeable when it comes from someone other than your dad!
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Old 12-06-2008, 12:34 PM
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Default RE: .22 vs all other

100 yds is often considered an acceptable maximum under ideal conditions for the 22LR. That being said, Ive had windy days I couldn't hit a beer can at 75 yrds with any consistancy, and Ive had calm days when I could hit ant hills at 200 yrds lobbing them in there with a S&W 617 (long range sixgunning is so much fun once you get the hang of it, and its not nearly as tough as it sounds, Im no pistol expert by any means). The highpower rifle rounds are another story entirely. Those mentioned, with a trained shooter and under ideal, known conditions are all 1000yd rounds with no struggle. Now at that range they are packing significantly less wallop than at more standard ranges, but lethal none the less. When you get up into the big boomers, cartridges like the 338 Lapua, 408 Chey-Tac, 416 Barret, 300/338 UM and the like, burning b/w 120 and 200 grains of power and pushing 200-300 gr bullets at varmint-class velocities, you can nearly double the above figure. Again, this is all with highly specialized rifles, handloads, and trained, experianced shooters. Alas, a picture is worth a thousand words, you and your son play around with this calculator...

http://www.biggameinfo.com/index.aspx?page=%2fbalcalc.ascx

You can find the pertinant BC of any given bullet on the respective manufacturers web site, which you will need for accurate figures. You'll never know as much as you did when you were 18!!! Having just turned 30 a few days ago, am I but just beginning to figure that out myself ;-)
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Old 12-08-2008, 05:28 AM
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Default RE: .22 vs all other

Here's Chuck Hawks rifle trajectory table.
http://www.chuckhawks.com/rifle_trajectory_table.htm
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Old 12-08-2008, 08:39 AM
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Default RE: .22 vs all other

The distance a bullet will travel vs the distance it travels with any accuracy are two very different things. Factories considerone mile to be the potential range of the .22 LR for safety purposes. However, its' accurate rangeis limited to shorter distances. Due to its low velocity, the .22 LR has a very steep trajectory, and is very susceptible to wind drift as well. I have heard of matches being fired with .22 LR target rifles at 200 yards, but the groups they produce at such a distance are not particularly small if there is any wind at all.

OTOH, the various HP rilfe rounds you listed can be dangerous out to +-5000 yards if fired at a 30-degree angle of elevation, and the bullet in use is designed for long range, such as the .30 caliber 220-grain Sierra MatchKing. Such a load can be accurate at 1200 yards or more, for target shooting purposes. Even a .243 Win. with a pointed boattail bullet of 100 grains or so could be used at distances up to 600-800 yards for target shooting. I once tried my 22-250 with 55-grain bullets at 500 yards (on a calm day) and was surprised at how well it did on the Army "A" target at that range.

The main factors influencing the distance a bullet can travel are its shape (form factor) and weight in relation to its diameter ("sectional density"). A figure derived from these two factors is called the "ballistic coefficent", a fancy term for a given projectile's ability to overcome air resistance. In addition, the initial speed of the bullet (muzzle velocity)as it leaves the muzzle of the gun has an influence on range as well.

A bullet with good weight in relation to its diameter, witha long, sharp noseon front and a tapered heel on the rear ("boattail") will travel farther than a blunt or round-nosed, stubby one if both start out at the same speed.

If your son is interested in such matters, I suggest he go to the library and ask them to get him a copy of HATCHER'S NOTEBOOK,by Julian S. Hatcher. It has several fascinating chapters on ballistics (and other gun-related subjects).
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Old 12-08-2008, 12:23 PM
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Default RE: .22 vs all other

Thanks for the replies. I'm 44 now and if I knew what my son thinks he knows when I was 18, I should be a brain doctor or a rocket scientist by now! Sometimes hearing it from someone besides your parents make it more believeable.
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Old 12-08-2008, 01:43 PM
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Default RE: .22 vs all other

Mark Twain said, "When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years."
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