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Question on Youth Rem. model 710

Old 11-04-2006, 08:11 AM
  #1  
Nontypical Buck
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Default Question on Youth Rem. model 710

I was looking at getting one for my son, and was talking to a friend about it. He told me he talked to a local dealer down in Warrensburg that told him, that "some of the parts in the 710 are plastic", and that his local Rem. representative had advised him not to sell it to anyone. Has anyone here heard of this? I can't imagine Remington making firing pin and parts critical to firing a gun out of plastic! But I could be wrong. I know the stock is synthetic/plactic, but I can't believe that is what he was talking about. Would like to know more if anyone here can elaborate more on it. Thanks. Scott.
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Old 11-04-2006, 08:36 AM
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710






by Wayne van Zwoll




Remington 710 bolt-action rifle: A self-lubricating nylon receiver insert lowers production costs so the rifle can sell for $425 with a 3-9x40 Bushnell scope! Available in .270 and .30-06, it has a synthetic stock and removable magazine. No, it doesn’t balance like a Mannlicher-Schoenauer; but it’s durable, and the sample I had shot into
an inch and a half.
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Old 11-04-2006, 08:49 AM
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710

ORIGINAL: Ridge Runner

the trigger guard on them is molded into the stock, making it prone to breakage, only way to fix it once broken is with a new stock. the barrel isn't changable, the magazine is plastic.
My advise is get a regular model 7, have a smith drill the back of the stock with a 1/4 oversized bit, then take off rndom pieces till it fits the child, then as the child grows add 1/4" back here and there, then remove 1/4" and add 1/2" to keep up with growth, use the predrilled holes as dowel guides to keep everything kinda in-line.as the child approaches full size, let them pick out a new aftermarket stock, this way they have a rifle that will serve them a lifetime, not just a so-so gun to serve them through a diffacult period. my 8 yo has a remmy model 600 set up like described, there is also a new bedded brown precision stock awaiting her adulthood.
RR
I see your point, I did this with a Mossberg 500 20g. for him, but a rifle in my opinion is a little differant. Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesnt the barrel on a youth model differ in length then that of the real deal of an adult model? If not, then I wouldn't have a problem with that route. But if the adult model has a longer barrel, then that's what I'm trying to stay away from. He has problems with the weight of my Rem 700 in 25-06, so my thought was the youth model to reduce weight in the over all gun via a shorter barrel. Help, need more info! Thanks, Scott.
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Old 11-04-2006, 09:09 AM
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710

MODEL 710™ YOUTH

[align=left]Caliber[/align]
Mag. Cap.
Barrel Length
Rate of Twist
Overall Length
Avg. Wt. (lbs.)
Order No.
MSRP*

243 Win
4
20"
9 1/8"
39 1/2"
6 7/8
27418
$439
LOP: 12 3/8"; Drop at Comb: 1 1/8"; Drop at Heel: 1 3/8"
* NOTE: U.S. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual price may vary.






MODEL 710™

caliber

Mag.
Cap.
Barrel Length
Rate of Twist
Overall Length
Avg. Wt. (lbs.)
Order No.
MSRP*

243 Win
4
22"
10"
42 1/2"
7 1/8
27416
$439

LOP: 13 3/8"; Drop at Comb: 1 1/8"; Drop at Heel: 1 3/8"
*NOTE: U.S. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual price may vary.
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Old 11-04-2006, 01:21 PM
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710

I suspect that many dealers and gunsmiths don't like the 710 because it doesn't provide them with the potential "after the sale" income. There's probably also a lot lower profit margin on a 710 and other entry-level models. Who's going to sink a lot of money - such as a high dollar scope or trigger work - into an entry-level rifle?

I've heard a few claims about internal plastic parts on the 710, but never seen or read anything before about plastic firing pins. My 710 has the nylon insert in the receiver, but I believe the newer models are all steel and do not have the insert. The 710's magazine is metal, not plastic. The base plate on the mag is plastic as is the follower, but the housing/box itself is metal.

As for the trigger guard being made of "plastic", let me say one word: "Glock". The 710 is by no means in the same league as Glock, but these "plastic" guns were derided 20-something years ago as "tupperware" and other derogatory terms because some thought it sacrilege for a firearm to be made of "plastic". I'm not going to take a hammer to my 710's trigger guard to see how much pounding it can actually take, but I imagine it's not something that will easily break.

I would bet that whatever force might end up breaking a synthetic trigger guard would also possibly bend a metal one into the trigger and possibly damage it, so arguing over a "plastic" trigger guard seems to me to be nothing more than nit-picking.
*************************
Forgot to mention that I've had a 710 for 3 years now and found it to be quite a competent rifle. It shoots nice groups, has worked flawlessly and taken a couple of deer. I got mine in .30-06 because it would handle anything I might ever get the chance to hunt and my duaghter can use the Remington Managed Recoil loads when we hunt together.
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Old 11-04-2006, 02:48 PM
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710

I would bet that whatever force might end up breaking a synthetic trigger guard would also possibly bend a metal one into the trigger and possibly damage it, so arguing over a "plastic" trigger guard seems to me to be nothing more than nit-picking.
But if youdamaged a metal triggerguard,you simply replace the triggerguard.With the 710,you have to buy a new stock.
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Old 11-04-2006, 03:05 PM
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710

Check out the youth Savage.
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Old 11-04-2006, 03:15 PM
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710

The 710 is garbage.
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Old 11-04-2006, 08:21 PM
  #9  
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710

I HATE the 710. I am a die hard remington fan and really hate this rifle. Cheap workmanship and sloppy action is not what I want in a rifle. Not to mention an rem 700 ADL with a scope is the same price. Mine has a nikon scope so its a little more, but the regular Wally World busnell's will work just fine. Mine shoots clover groupsat 100 yds!
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Old 11-04-2006, 09:09 PM
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Default RE: Question on Youth Rem. model 710

ORIGINAL: pahntr760

Not to mention an rem 700 ADL with a scope is the same price. Mine has a nikon scope so its a little more, but the regular Wally World busnell's will work just fine. Mine shoots clover groupsat 100 yds!
I call B.S. on this. If a Remington 700 model was available for the same price, there'd be no need to offer the 710? Maybe on clearance it's the same price, but not normally. The least expensive Rem 700 I could find on Wal-mart's web site was $500. Take on a cheap scope for another $500 and your $200-250 more than a 710.

This is interesting....found this bit about the Rem 700 on Chuck Hawk's web site. In an article about the Remington 700, he mentions cost cutting measures Remington used back in the '60s to produce the 700:
The Model 700 action was designed for ease of manufacture, given the manufacturing technology of the early 1960's, and uses a round action machined from bar stock, a plunger ejector in the bolt face, and a sort of circlip in the bolt face that snaps over the rim of a chambered cartridge to extract the fired brass. The bolt face is recessed to enclose the base of the cartridge, which is also surrounded by the chamber end of the barrel and the front receiver ring. The cartridge head is thus circled by three rings of steel, much as with the Weatherby Mark V action, and this fact was not overlooked by the Remington advertising department.
Traditionalists considered these cost cutting innovations "cheap," but the customers responded in droves to the undeniable good looks of the Model 700 ADL and BDL rifles themselves.


Hehe....traditionalists originally thought the 700 to be "cheap". Same thing they say about the 710 now. Not that the 710 will ever reach the same level of popularity, but it is somewhat ironic that the 700 was considered a "cheap" rifle at one time due to manufacturing techiniques that attempted to make the 700 affordable.
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