Freshwater Fishing Discussion of all aspects of freshwater fishing.

fly fishing

Old 09-07-2006, 10:10 PM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: sanford fl.
Posts: 2,147
Default RE: fly fishing

Practice,practice,practice.
motor is offline  
Old 09-07-2006, 11:21 PM
  #12  
Dominant Buck
 
Rebel Hog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: WC FL
Posts: 26,323
Default RE: fly fishing

Orvis | Fly Fishing Videos
Rebel Hog is offline  
Old 09-08-2006, 12:42 PM
  #13  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: WV
Posts: 4,485
Default RE: fly fishing

You push this barbed like stick pin at teh end of th eline
With all due respect Chuck--don't do that. Learn to tie the proper knots or at least use one of those nylon loop assemblies (nail knot is still the best) those little ol stick pins will come out --one day when you have a big fish on (exactly the wrong time). Plus, they are metal and will cause the line to sink to some degree. Knots are easy to learn if you practice them (like anything else).
hillbillyhunter1 is offline  
Old 09-08-2006, 05:20 PM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location:
Posts: 158
Default RE: fly fishing

I got pretty into flyfishing, but haven't done much over the past 4 years since I moved to the land of saltwater fishing (where there isn't much shore access and I don't have a boat...yet). Honestly, I don't think there's much out there worth getting as an outfit for under $200. Sorry, but that's the way it is. A quality flyline alone will cost you $60+. You never mentioned what you'd be fishing for, which can make a great deal of difference in what rod you're looking for. If you're fishing for panfish or trout, something in the 4-5wt range would work perfectly. If you're fishing for pike or musky, a 9-10wt would be much more appropriate. Rods are rated from 0wt all the way up to something like a 14wt that would be used for offshore saltwater fishing. Flyfishing isn't difficult...it requires some hand/eye coordination and learning the timing of the rod, but I'd say within a few days you could become an effective fisherman with very little outside help from anyone. Flytying can be as intricate and detailed as you want it to be, or fairly simple to tie the few patterns that you really need to catch fish. It's possible to tie flies that can catch fish with a simple pair of vise-grips and 2-3 materials. Or you can spend hundreds of dollars on a real vise and thousands on materials to tie everything under the sun and water. You can make what you want of it. One of the best resources on the internet is www.flyanglersonline.com. I used to spend a lot of time on their forums when I was more active with it, and you'll find some of the most knowledgeable people hanging out there, as well as many tutorials that can take you from where you are now up to the most advanced stuff you're likely to ever try. Good luck!
RiverOtter is offline  
Old 09-08-2006, 05:58 PM
  #15  
Dominant Buck
 
Chuck7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 25,116
Default RE: fly fishing

With all due respect Chuck--don't do that. Learn to tie the proper knots or at least use one of those nylon loop assemblies (nail knot is still the best) those little ol stick pins will come out --one day when you have a big fish on (exactly the wrong time). Plus, they are metal and will cause the line to sink to some degree. Knots are easy to learn if you practice them (like anything else). Hillbilly

No problem. I can tie the other knots.I just like the stick pins really good.I've never had a big fish come off. Anyway ,for the little use my flyrod was getting I sold it at a yard sale. I switched to ultra light spinning instead. I no longer have a fly rod. If I do get another I'd like to get a bamboo one.
Chuck7 is offline  
Old 09-09-2006, 10:57 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Forest, Ontario
Posts: 250
Default RE: fly fishing

I started fly fishing not to long ago also. I live in Ontario as well, so when I bought my rod I went to Grand River Troutfitters in Fergus. They were very helpful in helping me purchase a rod. They were leaning me toward a Temple Fork rod with an orvis reel. Price was something like $120 for rod, reel, and line. I however have a strong distaste of imported goods from Asia. I settled for a used Sage SLT 5 weight. Yes I paid more for it but I am personally more satisfied with it. It works beautifully for trout on the Grand. If you don't have a problem with imported goods or simply don't want to spend the money, then go for a cheaper $50-$100 rod. However, If you don't mind spending a little more on a quality used rod, you'll probably get more enjoyment out of it. Just my thought but I'd avoid Canadian Tire for fly rods and go to Cabela's or someplace else. Yes I fly tie even though for some dumb reason I started tying like two years before I got the rod. I was, as you are, fascinated with the art. I certainly can't tie great flies yet, but they're coming with practice. You'll definately get help out of a book or two. Fly fishing's a lot of fun; keep up the interest. I'm only 16 and love it.
Matthew V. (An outdoorsman) is offline  
Old 09-10-2006, 11:46 AM
  #17  
Thread Starter
 
mallard stalker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lanark county, Ontario
Posts: 1,412
Default RE: fly fishing

Thanks for the help. Likeyou guys said I got a book "the fly fishermans streamside handguide" and it has helped alot. Also i'd be fishing bass, sunfish and trout.
mallard stalker is offline  
Old 09-10-2006, 07:54 PM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location:
Posts: 158
Default RE: fly fishing

For those species you might be looking at a compromise to buy a single rod. Panfish are more suited to a low rod weight, like a 3-4 wt. rod. Depending on your location and size of trout where you're at, a 5-6 wt is probably ideal. To throw larger flies for bass, you're looking at probably a 6-8wt. For an overall compromise, probably look at a 6wt. rod. It's pretty versatile (I have one), and you should do fine going up or down in sizes of flies with it.
RiverOtter is offline  
Old 09-11-2006, 08:26 AM
  #19  
Fork Horn
 
DUMB BASS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: NEW ATHENS, IL, USA
Posts: 426
Default RE: fly fishing

I fly fish a lot. Don't buy that rod you posted. Try a Temple Fork Outfitters rod. I believe Bass Pro sells them. They are aVERY good entry level rod for the price, and you can buy combos with the reel and line all set up.I would suggest a 6 wt pole. It will do pretty much every thing you need it to. If you've never casted before, go toa fly shop and ask for some pointers, or rent a video or something. Proper tecnique learned early will save plenty of headaches and frustration later. Be patient. Another vote for DO NOT use the little push pin deals, you'll lose a big fish eventually. Tying flies is fun, and you'll gain great confidence and pleasure out of catching fish on your own creations. It takes a while for your flies to look good, but don't worry about it. I've caught plenty of fish on crummy lookin bugs. When you get that 1st bass to explode on your bug you'll be hooked. Dry flies are easiest to fish cause you can see em, but learn to nymph for trout. The learning curve is a bit steeper, but once you get the hang of it you'll catch more trout. Dry flies are fun to fish when the fish are rising, but 99% of fish eat underwater. Good luck, and have fun.
DUMB BASS is offline  
Old 09-12-2006, 03:20 PM
  #20  
Thread Starter
 
mallard stalker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lanark county, Ontario
Posts: 1,412
Default RE: fly fishing

ok new rod now http://www.basspro.com/servlet/catalog.TextId?hvarTextId=29749&hvarDept=175&a mp;hvarEvent=&hvarClassCode=1&hvarSubCode= 3&hvarTarget=browse
Thank you all for helping!
mallard stalker is offline  

Quick Reply: fly fishing


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.