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Ranges from a tree??

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Ranges from a tree??

Old 09-26-2011, 11:12 AM
  #1  
Fork Horn
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Default Ranges from a tree??

ok i read this form but didnt understand it 100%. If im in my tree stand that is 16 feet up and a deer comes to 15 yrds would i aim the same way as i would if i was on flat ground?? hope you can help thanks
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Old 09-27-2011, 04:47 AM
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Ok I am going to try and make this as easy as possible…

When you do ranges from your stand think of it as a triangle. You have 2 sides of the triangle 15 yards to the target, and 5 yards up the tree (I know it is actually 5.3 yards but for math purposes I am bringing you down a foot). Now all you need to do is find the other side of your triangle using the formula…

A squared + B squared = C squared

So then you plug in the numbers

5 squared + 15 squared = C squared

5x5 + 15x15 = C squared

25 + 225 = C squared

250 = C squared

Now to find out “C” (or the distance you are actually shooting) you would do the opposite of squaring which would be the SQUARE ROOT….

So take the Square Root of 250….

15.81 = C

So in the case you presented you would be shooting about 16 yards…

I would suggest investing in a Calculator

Happy Hunting!
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Old 09-27-2011, 10:56 AM
  #3  
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haha ok i understand thanks alot
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Old 09-27-2011, 11:27 AM
  #4  
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Don't let the latest fad of angle compensating range finders confuse you. LOL!

Fact is, nearly everyone has purchased Laser Range Finders over the last 10 years so and sales had become flat..... sooooooo, the industry seemed to make a huge push and advertising campaign convincing hunters that their old LRF's needed to be Upgraded to the newer compensating models! LOL!

The REAL difference from ANY realistic bowhunting yardage and stand height is nearly NOTHING! LOL! Honestly, climb a stand and test this yourself and time and time again you'll find that the impact change is always very, very minimal!
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Old 09-27-2011, 12:10 PM
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These guys are right. The difference in distance is very minimal. What you must do thought is to learn to draw your bow as you would on level ground then bend at the waist to aim down. The idea is to keep the head and shoulders in proper position (T form) in relation to each other.

Many people forget or don't know this and just lower their bow arm to aim down. This changes the relationship between the head and shoulders and the view through the peep sight. The result is usually a high hit.
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Old 09-28-2011, 03:58 PM
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All you need to remember is to always shoot/aim for the "horizontal" distance to the target. Gravity only effects arrow drop over the horizontal distance. so, if your in a tree and a deer comes by, range the closest object to the deer at your eye level. so if your in a tree 16' up then range another tree close to the target at 16' up.
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Old 09-28-2011, 05:46 PM
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like dont drink says, gravity will only effect your arrow on a horizontal plane so you should measure from the base of the tree and you will be very close to dead on. hope i helped
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Old 09-29-2011, 09:27 AM
  #8  
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Unless you're at a crazy height shooting something very close to your tree, the difference between slant distance and horizontal distance is almost meaningless (less than 2 yards in most cases). It's simple trigonometry...run the numbers and you'll see there's very little distance if your stand is 16 feet up, shooting at 15-30 yards.

Many people forget or don't know this and just lower their bow arm to aim down. This changes the relationship between the head and shoulders and the view through the peep sight. The result is usually a high hit.
This answer. So much this answer. This is the reason the vast majority of people hit high from a tree stand, and not anything to do with the differences in range.

Last edited by UPHunter08; 09-29-2011 at 09:30 AM.
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Old 09-29-2011, 12:50 PM
  #9  
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like dont drink stated. Only the horizontal distance matters. but at reasonable distances it will not matter much. usually only a yard or 2 difference.
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