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climbing stand help.

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climbing stand help.

Old 09-30-2010, 05:29 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Default climbing stand help.

i just got an ameristep climber. this is my first time using a climber, and its seeming pretty hard to get the hang of it. if i barely bump the top it falls, if i sit to far back on it it falls. so im afraid to go up very high with it yet. maybe its just me being new to using it, or i might not be using it right. i was testing it out on a telephone pole that wasnt very big. am i missing something? do i need to try a bigger tree.? or am i just inexperienced and need more time to get used to it? any help would be appriciated.
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Old 09-30-2010, 06:09 PM
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When you go up the tree you got to kind of put your weight to the rear. I kind of hop on the foot portion to let the teeth dig in. You can kind of push down on the top portion so the teeth dig in a little more. Pressure the farther from the tree is key.

Remember set your stand up at a higher angle to compensate for the tree narrowing as you go up. Or your stand will be a bad angle downwards. I made a quick drawing to illustrate it. Couldn’t really explain to well.
Attached Thumbnails climbing stand help.-untitled.jpg  
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Old 09-30-2010, 06:31 PM
  #3  
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Some of them don't climb on telephone poles well. When you set the stand up at the bottom of the tree you want to keep it with a slight angle upward so, when you get to where you want to hunt it will be level. Find an actual tree to learn how to climb in it. It will help your confidence and please, always wear your harness.
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Old 09-30-2010, 07:54 PM
  #4  
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id say mine is one of them that doesnt like telphone poles. it was the easiest, straightest thing i had to try it on. im going to try it on a tree 2moro and see if that helps. hopefully it will be a little more secure, i was really looking forward to using it alot this year, but if i dont get any more confidence in it i dont think im going to be able to.
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Old 09-30-2010, 08:53 PM
  #5  
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I'm telling ya a climber that is easy to take in and out of the woods is worth 1000 times it's price tag. Learn to use it and get confidence in it. No one says you have to go 30 ft up in a tree. Try going 10 the once you get a little more confidence try going a little higher

I've shot my biggest bucks out of my climber. It's nice when you can head into the woods and scout find hot sign and zip up the tree and hunt then and there.

One thing I always do for a little more safety is I bring up 2 ratchet strapes and ratchet the two pieces to the tree. Just one more safety measure.
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Old 10-01-2010, 04:19 AM
  #6  
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I have a heavy bungee cord that gets wrapped around the tree and top part of the stand once I have it where I want it.

It seems to stop any movement or squeaks that used to happen when shifting weight when standing to take a shot or shifting weight in the seat.



Mitch
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Old 10-01-2010, 04:19 AM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by deernutz View Post
When you go up the tree you got to kind of put your weight to the rear. I kind of hop on the foot portion to let the teeth dig in. You can kind of push down on the top portion so the teeth dig in a little more. Pressure the farther from the tree is key.

Remember set your stand up at a higher angle to compensate for the tree narrowing as you go up. Or your stand will be a bad angle downwards. I made a quick drawing to illustrate it. Couldn’t really explain to well.
I am gonna say that it is advised to not hop on the foot portion of your stand. The movement could actually cause the teeth to lose grip. Also try it on a real tree... The telephone pole is probably alot of the OP's problem.
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Old 10-01-2010, 05:01 AM
  #8  
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I'll echo a lot of comments that your problem is likely because it was on a telephone pole...they don't have any bark. Climber stands usually grip best when the tree has some bark that the teeth on the stand can dig into. Bare wood (like a pole) or smooth bark, like on some hardwoods or aspen, are prone to slipping, I've found. I like older trees with rougher bark with some give to it, because the teeth on the climber bite better. What I do is climb to my desired height, and then bounce lightly on the platform to dig the teeth into the bark. Then I tighten the security strap around the tree as best as I can to prevent the stand from slipping if I adjust my weight on the platform or seat.

Instead of practicing on a pole, try it out on the kind of trees you expect to hunt from. You'll find that each type of tree is different and presents a different challenge. Old Red Maples, for example, have really rough bark that comes apart in plates, so your cable will often catch on them and noisily rip off chunks of bark as you climb if you're not paying attention.

Also, +1 to the comments about angling the stand upward when you start. It takes some practice to figure how much lean you need to start off with depending on the taper of the tree and the height at which you want to hunt.
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Old 10-01-2010, 05:59 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by UPHunter08 View Post
Climber stands usually grip best when the tree has some bark that the teeth on the stand can dig into.

I like older trees with rougher bark with some give to it, because the teeth on the climber bite better. What I do is climb to my desired height, and then bounce lightly on the platform to dig the teeth into the bark. Then I tighten the security strap around the tree as best as I can to prevent the stand from slipping if I adjust my weight on the platform or seat.

You'll find that each type of tree is different and presents a different challenge.

+1 angling the stand upward when you start. It takes some practice to figure how much lean you need to start off with depending on the taper of the tree and the height at which you want to hunt.
Some really good tips in this post. Could not have said it any better.
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Old 10-01-2010, 09:49 AM
  #10  
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Ditto on putting weight at the end of the platform furthest from the tree and the same with the seat portion. Let those teeth dig in. Also make sure you tie the top and bottom half together, you don't want to be dangling from the seat while your platform skitters down the tree. Also a ratchet strap around the tree attached to the seat portion helps keep things secure, and as others have said, angle the stand upwards so it will level out as you climb. If you didn't angle it up enough, climb down, adjust and start again. Its no fun being up there with the platform or seat angled downwards, at least not for me. I always feel like I am going to fall. All is good when level though.
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