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elk

Old 07-31-2012, 09:52 AM
  #1  
Spike
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will it being so dry and all the dead trees in wyoming change the elk hunting much?
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:09 AM
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Wyoming is big, so it will vary from location to location. While it may be a drought year, there are numerous seeps and springs in most all mountain country that will be used in areas where there are elk. The dead trees shouldn't be as much of a factor as quality of forage. Where are you thinking of hunting?
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Old 08-01-2012, 01:04 PM
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Spike
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Originally Posted by wyomingtrapper View Post
Wyoming is big, so it will vary from location to location. While it may be a drought year, there are numerous seeps and springs in most all mountain country that will be used in areas where there are elk. The dead trees shouldn't be as much of a factor as quality of forage. Where are you thinking of hunting?
will be hunting in units 15 and or 21 i beleave.
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Old 08-01-2012, 01:11 PM
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Dry weather may be an advantage for hunters in some cases. For example, if 80% of the water holes are dried up, I guess that means your elk are going to concentrate to drink in the remaining 20% of the water holes that are NOT dried up. Likewise, if 80% of the vegetation is in bad shape due to the drought, that means all the elk are going to concentrate on the remaining 20% of vegetation in good condition.

The draught may cause the elk to be more clusted up or on a smaller segment of land. This CAN be an advantage to the hunter.
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Old 09-12-2012, 10:14 AM
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ALSATIAN makes a good point, although you need to remember how far elk will range for food. I work at a VA hospital, and I talk to EVERY vet who comes through my office from near my hunting area. Word on the talkbox is that the elk are already moving down into agricultural areas to feed on irrigated fields. They stay just above and out of sight during daylight hours and move in to feed during the cooler, darker hours. Many springs have dried up completely as the snowmelt ran dry weeks and even months ago. When the food and water are gone, they will likely migrate en masse to a whole other area where resources are more plentiful and competition is lighter. Unfortunately, that is frequently private land, and permission to hunt is a lot harder to get these days.

Now, judging by the current weather patterns, the very recent increase in rainfall might bring the elk back up. Then again, they might just stay where they are. If nothing pushes them out- hunting, weather, food, etc.... then they'll just stay put. If hunting pressure gets them moving scared, they could head for the hills again. It's hard to say. I guess when it comes down to it, there's no substitute for time spent scouting.
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Old 09-15-2012, 06:40 PM
  #6  
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can anyone say damage hunts boys and girls??!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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