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diy alaska moose hunt

Old 01-29-2011, 12:03 AM
  #21  
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Jeff AK, very good advice and very helpful post. Kudos to you.
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Old 01-29-2011, 12:24 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by joemontana
thanks i will definitly check this pristine out. would you do a float or drop camp type hunt in a good area.the float looks like you cover a lot more area than you could out of one spot.does his fee cover both of us that would hunt or does each of us have to buy the info. it sounds like his advice basicly covers everything u would need to do for your hunt except actually hunting which would be really good info since a person has no idea what u r getting into till u have done this hunt a time or two. does that sum his sevices up.
His fee is per group, so if you split it up two or three ways it's downright cheap. Larry's an expert on float hunts. He designs rafts and rafting equipment specifically for float hunting Alaska, so your best bet is to go that route. He also wrote the book "A Complete Guide to Float Hunting Alaska" and has produced DVD's on float hunting. A float hunt allows you to cover a lot more ground than a drop hunt will. On a drop hunt you're also more inclined to hike out farther if you can't find game close, which can lead you to making the rookie mistake of shooting a moose several miles back in and then spending days in agony packing it out. Trust me, packing a moose any significant distance at all is just a whole lot of suck. I think I mentioned before he's out of the country for a couple weeks so it might take him a bit to get back to you, but he will.
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:09 PM
  #23  
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that sounds good. i will definitly look forward to getting ahold of him. thanks jeff u have been a great source of info if u ever make it to montana and want to hunt we arent guides are anything but would enjoy taking you hunting in the montana backcountry no strings attached.
Originally Posted by AK Jeff
His fee is per group, so if you split it up two or three ways it's downright cheap. Larry's an expert on float hunts. He designs rafts and rafting equipment specifically for float hunting Alaska, so your best bet is to go that route. He also wrote the book "A Complete Guide to Float Hunting Alaska" and has produced DVD's on float hunting. A float hunt allows you to cover a lot more ground than a drop hunt will. On a drop hunt you're also more inclined to hike out farther if you can't find game close, which can lead you to making the rookie mistake of shooting a moose several miles back in and then spending days in agony packing it out. Trust me, packing a moose any significant distance at all is just a whole lot of suck. I think I mentioned before he's out of the country for a couple weeks so it might take him a bit to get back to you, but he will.
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Old 01-30-2011, 12:08 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by joemontana
that sounds good. i will definitly look forward to getting ahold of him. thanks jeff u have been a great source of info if u ever make it to montana and want to hunt we arent guides are anything but would enjoy taking you hunting in the montana backcountry no strings attached.
Thanks for the invite Joe, but I grew up in Montana and my family still lives there. They'd be pretty hacked if I came back to hunt in MT and didn't go back to the ranch with them. Just holler if you have anymore questions about Alaska. I've learned a thing or two up here over the years.
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Old 01-30-2011, 12:54 PM
  #25  
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Well thanks i do have other questions. Like what kinds of food would u take along when we go in the bob for 10 days we carry 2 coolers with dry ice and eat just like u would at home but hunting where u have to watch ur weight limits would be different and i like to eat a good meal in the evening any suggestions on this.We pack a wall tent in u cant do that there any suggestions .The rivers u float are they pretty calm or u hit pretty good rapids? Sorry ask a lot of questions but have learned from hunting in the backcountry u need to be prepared as best u can.At least u wouldnt have to worry about horses spooking and losing half ur gear down the down the mountian,been there dun that.
Originally Posted by AK Jeff
Thanks for the invite Joe, but I grew up in Montana and my family still lives there. They'd be pretty hacked if I came back to hunt in MT and didn't go back to the ranch with them. Just holler if you have anymore questions about Alaska. I've learned a thing or two up here over the years.
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Old 01-30-2011, 02:19 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by joemontana
Well thanks i do have other questions. Like what kinds of food would u take along when we go in the bob for 10 days we carry 2 coolers with dry ice and eat just like u would at home but hunting where u have to watch ur weight limits would be different and i like to eat a good meal in the evening any suggestions on this.We pack a wall tent in u cant do that there any suggestions .The rivers u float are they pretty calm or u hit pretty good rapids? Sorry ask a lot of questions but have learned from hunting in the backcountry u need to be prepared as best u can.At least u wouldnt have to worry about horses spooking and losing half ur gear down the down the mountian,been there dun that.
I usually pack Mountain House meals when I'm looking to save weight. They seem to pack enough calories, even for hunts with high energy requirements, like sheep hunting. The only problem I've had is that the high sodium content will make it a little rough on the south end of your digestive tract. They're supposed to be using more low sodium recipes lately to help combat that problem. Bartlett for instance doesn't like Mountain House at all so he tends to eat a lot of rice dishes, and things that you can add water to in the field to save on weight. I'm sure he could give you plenty of ideas for light weight food choices.

Alaska has about 3,000 navigable rivers and they range from Class I to V and everything in between. You can organize a hunt to suit whatever your desires are as far as river conditions. Keep in mind that the easier a river is to float the more likely it is to be a popular place for other hunters as well.

There's plenty of lightweight tent choices out there. Titanium Goat, Kifaru, Hilleberg, Kelty, Mountain Hardware, etc. A wall tent is way overkill for a float hunt where you're going to break camp on a near daily basis, and extra weight equals higher cost.
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Old 01-31-2011, 03:12 PM
  #27  
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What about using hip boots vs waders beings ur pretty much like duck hunting floating the river.And the weather this time of year probably if u dont like it wait a minute right?Would it be a good idea to get bear tag to or something else u might see while hunting since your there anyway?
Originally Posted by AK Jeff
I usually pack Mountain House meals when I'm looking to save weight. They seem to pack enough calories, even for hunts with high energy requirements, like sheep hunting. The only problem I've had is that the high sodium content will make it a little rough on the south end of your digestive tract. They're supposed to be using more low sodium recipes lately to help combat that problem. Bartlett for instance doesn't like Mountain House at all so he tends to eat a lot of rice dishes, and things that you can add water to in the field to save on weight. I'm sure he could give you plenty of ideas for light weight food choices.

Alaska has about 3,000 navigable rivers and they range from Class I to V and everything in between. You can organize a hunt to suit whatever your desires are as far as river conditions. Keep in mind that the easier a river is to float the more likely it is to be a popular place for other hunters as well.

There's plenty of lightweight tent choices out there. Titanium Goat, Kifaru, Hilleberg, Kelty, Mountain Hardware, etc. A wall tent is way overkill for a float hunt where you're going to break camp on a near daily basis, and extra weight equals higher cost.
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Old 02-01-2011, 08:41 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by joemontana
What about using hip boots vs waders beings ur pretty much like duck hunting floating the river.And the weather this time of year probably if u dont like it wait a minute right?Would it be a good idea to get bear tag to or something else u might see while hunting since your there anyway?
I've worn hippers and light weight chest waders on floats up here. Hippers are obviously problematic if the water is very deep, but I do like that they're less tear prone. Chest waders and good wading boots are generally more comfortable over long periods of time. August/September tend to be the rainiest months in a lot of Alaska. Of course it can be hot, or snow, but more often then not it's cool and rainy. As a non-resident you can't hunt grizzlies without a guide, and since you live in Montana I wouldn't bother getting a black bear tag. Interior Alaska black bears are generally pretty small.
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Old 02-03-2011, 10:52 AM
  #29  
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Just got a call back from the Trooper. The distinction is in fact one of residence. If you are a resident here by definition, you get to hunt after you've been in Alaska for 12 months and meet all the regs -- makes no difference whether you are a US citizen or a "resident alien". If you just drop in to hunt and you're from another country, you have to hire an outfitter regardless of species being hunted.

So I've learned a new thing today...

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Last edited by Alvasin; 10-05-2011 at 12:08 PM.
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:25 AM
  #30  
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I just read the regs there is a difference between alien and nr us citizen. a nr citizen of the united states which is a person that doesnt live in alaska but from another us state can hunt everything but sheep ,grizzly or goats without a guide.
Originally Posted by Alvasin
Just got a call back from the Trooper. The distinction is in fact one of residence. If you are a resident here by definition, you get to hunt after you've been in Alaska for 12 months and meet all the regs -- makes no difference whether you are a US citizen or a "resident alien". If you just drop in to hunt and you're from another country, you have to hire an outfitter regardless of species being hunted.

So I've learned a new thing today...
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