Old 02-23-2019, 06:19 AM
  #7  
hardcastonly
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Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: fla
Posts: 1,007
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btw
it helps to think things through logically , if you have a topo map and you see obvious camp sites listed ,
you know for sure hunting pressure will be applied expanding like rings in a pond that you threw a rock into come early pre-dawn,
many hunters will get up and trudge out of camp in the pre-dawn, knowing this provides a thinking person with a topo map a known, factor,
in game movement on the few opening days of the season in many areas.
most people will not climb up or down cliff faces or cross steams deeper than about 24" deep thus,
if your willing to study a topo map you may find areas that game will find almost secure from hunting pressure,
due to your average hunters reluctance to be uncomfortable, wet, or forced to work hard to access the area,
and you can certainly with some planing hike well into and far past the areas,
that get routinely flooded with the ebbing tide of the clueless orange masses.
be 1/2-to-1 mile or more up some canyon with limited access and on a higher terrain feature like a timbered bench, or ridge,
over looking a stream, or rolling aspen and willow, or in an area where the canyon walls or a sudden drop off a cliff limits travel,
and you concentrate and limit, game options exiting the area.
don,t make the mistake of loading yourself down with equipment think things through ,
use your head and limit what you take to necessities,
its really easy to over load yourself with equipment, but on the reverse, take what you'll NEED!
heres a quick memory jog list, for MY hunting day pack
(you sure may not need everything, and I don,t carry everything all the time)
(but this list may jog your memories or cause you too think.)
(remember you might be forced to stay out over night, & weather is unpredictable)
skinning knife
kukri
compact blade sharpener
compass
area topo maps
canteen
licences
cell phone (car charger and/or back-up batteries)
several lighters
several mil surplus trioxane heat tabs
granola bars
rain poncho
2 gallon zip lock bags
small block & tackle hoist & rope(50 ft parachute cord)
spare ammo
heavy hoodie jacket
large plastic tarp
aspirin
other meds
lip chapstick
water purification tablets, or filter/pump
down vest
gps
pack of wetnaps
toilet paper
emergency food
on your belt
large knife or light tomahawk, or kukuri
the cold steel (TRAIL MASTER, or ( KUKRI) are good choices
canteen

anything that could get screwed up if you fall in a creek like medicine, licences, cell phones etc. gets double zip loc bagged
related links
https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/altitude-sickness#1

https://www.uchealth.org/today/2017/...tude-sickness/

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000133.htm

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/altitude-sickness/

yes it takes some extra effort, some planing , and extra effort,
but a full cooler of elk meat and aching muscles beats tag soup!

obviously if you have suggestions, tips or knowledge to offer the less experienced members please post any helpful info

Last edited by hardcastonly; 02-26-2019 at 01:43 PM.
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