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Controlled burning

Old 03-14-2010, 12:12 PM
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Default Controlled burning

Does anyone use controlled burning practices to clear fields. I am thinking about burning off some fields prior to planting food plots. I planted 2 small plots last year in these fields but the grass and weeds are very thick. I would like to spray them to kill all the grass and weeds prior to prepping and planting, but the dead grass and weeds in the plot areas as well as the areas I am going to expand to are so thick I wander if the herbicide woul get thru effectively.
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Old 03-14-2010, 04:48 PM
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We plan to burn about 150 acres of a quail hunting cleared area one day this week. Just plow around it, pick a low wind day, get the permit and string fire around the area. I've got a 15 gallon tank with a small pump that has a fire torch wand on it. I mix diesel and gas, turn on the pump, lite it and just ride around the area.
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Old 03-15-2010, 08:51 AM
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As mentioned, if you've plowed/tilled a good fire line or made sufficient preparations, fire can be very beneficial. Around here, there is restrictions in place as to when you can do a controlled burn, so I always contact the local Fire Dept to get the OK or have them present to assist in case things don't go as planned. They're always glad to help and would do it free of charge, if I didn't insist on making a small donation.

If you were planning on tilling the field after the herbicide application, then burning the thick "mulch" would definitely be a benefit, and would make preparing a seed bed MUCH easier. Maybe two weeks or more after burning, when some of the perennials have begun to leaf out again and new seedlings have sprouted, making a chemical application then should result in a very clean seed bed. However, if you was planning on no-tilling corn or soybeans, then I would leave the thick stuff for added moisture retention through the hot summer months.

Some sprayer's do a better job with coverage in thick stuff also, I'm always amazed at the level of penetration in dense vegetation, only when the weeds/grass is matted to the ground have I seen areas where the spray didn't make a reasonable kill.
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Old 03-15-2010, 11:08 AM
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burn it. spray it when the new foliage is coming up. and spray on a clear sunny day. and then a week later, plow it. thats the best way if your lookin to use burning as a management tool
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Old 03-15-2010, 11:12 AM
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Make sure you call the local FD,

It will save you alot of problems along the way, especially if they deem it hazardous, because they will extinguish it and you wont be able to burn it again.
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Old 03-16-2010, 09:59 AM
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Thanks for all the info. I did burn some different fields a couple years ago but didn't follow up with any food plots. The burn followed by spraying sounds like what I will do. And yes I will be tilling and planting not no-till. I have 2 gallons of glysophat from left from last year. Wondering if their is a shelf life for this stuff, could I still use it this year? Thanks again for your respnses.
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Old 03-16-2010, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by onebigelk View Post
I have 2 gallons of glysophat from left from last year. Wondering if their is a shelf life for this stuff, could I still use it this year? Thanks again for your respnses.
I think it should still be good; I would test a little bit first to see.
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Old 03-16-2010, 11:57 AM
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Thats a good idea. I could test right now on some grass. Thanks.
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Old 03-16-2010, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by onebigelk View Post
Thanks for all the info. I did burn some different fields a couple years ago but didn't follow up with any food plots. The burn followed by spraying sounds like what I will do. And yes I will be tilling and planting not no-till. I have 2 gallons of glysophat from left from last year. Wondering if their is a shelf life for this stuff, could I still use it this year? Thanks again for your respnses.
Glyphosate is good for a minimum of 5 years if kept from freezing. If I remember correctly, -14 is the freezing point of 41% glyphosate.

Good luck with your plots, let us know how it goes!
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Old 03-18-2010, 06:45 PM
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Thanks for everyone's input.
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