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Rinse meat before grinding

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Old 11-22-2018, 06:10 AM
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throwing a couple strips of bacon in (about 5-7% percent by mass,) and a sprinkle of onion and garlic powder, with the small trimmed off venison scraps,
before you grind them up makes a decent basic for venison burgers if your going to use the ground venison that day or freeze it in patty form for later use.
Ive generally frozen a few for days when you really just want a burger and don,t really feel like cooking, they tend to go well with B&M baked beans and toasted ONION rolls.

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Old 11-22-2018, 09:00 AM
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I had a 3/4 mile drag to get him out. Through sand and pines. Was a tough haul.

I did a medium grind grind on it once through the grinder yesterday. Was a young buck so tender. Should I have ground it more? Seemed decent to me.
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Old 11-22-2018, 09:22 AM
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There's really no right answer to that question. Just depends what you want. I like a coarser grind for some things, like making jerky from it. And a smaller grind for other things.

Just have to try different ways and decide what works for you in my opinion.

I've also mostly quit adding fat. It can easily be added while cooking. But you can't seperate it out later. I prefer the lean grind. Although occasionally chop up bacon to mix in with burgers when I cook them

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Old 11-22-2018, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Kylecolb View Post
I had a 3/4 mile drag to get him out. Through sand and pines. Was a tough haul.



I wouldn't drag a deer 10 feet. Get a packframe and bring them out that way. Much easier, faster and your meat stays cleaner. If they won't let you bone one where you live (some states don't) then cut it in two and bring it out in halves. Keeping the meat clean is one of the most important parts of field care of venison.
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Old 11-22-2018, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by flags View Post
I wouldn't drag a deer 10 feet. Get a packframe and bring them out that way. Much easier, faster and your meat stays cleaner. If they won't let you bone one where you live (some states don't) then cut it in two and bring it out in halves. Keeping the meat clean is one of the most important parts of field care of venison.
This is a regional thing. Having done it both ways, I'm not sure that one is better EVERY TIME than another. For long distances packing them out is certainly better. But for 10', dragging and hanging is cleaner and easier for me. I don't even gut on short drags. I bring them home hang them and gut them directly into a large garbage can then wheel that to the woods with all the scraps and dump it.

Just depends on the situation I suppose. A 10' drag isn't hard though.

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Old 11-26-2018, 07:19 AM
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I wouldn't skin, bone, or do anything to a whitetail other than field dress it in the field. Dirt, hair, and leaves have to be in play while quartering, boning, and skinning in the field. I suspect there are ways to alleviate cross contamination. I just can't picture them other than being very meticulous which takes more time than I want to spend in the field with a downed deer.

I prefer hanging my deer to remove the skin, bones, and meat. Dragging on flat ground is no big deal. Uphill can be work.

To the OP, rinse it. Hair/dirt/sand will affect the taste more than a water rinse. If bloody water is dripping out of your grinder, strain or blot the meat prior to grinding.
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Old 11-26-2018, 11:12 AM
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I always rinse the meat off. Especially the back legs where the meat is exposed after field dressing. There is always some hair and blood on it. Doesn't affect it in the least. Like others said just pat off the excess water with a paper towel.
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Old 11-26-2018, 12:20 PM
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I make up a solution of vinegar and water and wipe down the freshly skinned carcass. This takes care of most, if not all, of the cross contaminants from transporting and skinning. Just keep the towel wet with the solution while wiping. I always hang my venison for 3-5 days and sometimes up to 7 if it was a particularly old animal.
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Old 11-26-2018, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Kylecolb View Post
I had a 3/4 mile drag to get him out. Through sand and pines. Was a tough haul.

I did a medium grind grind on it once through the grinder yesterday. Was a young buck so tender. Should I have ground it more? Seemed decent to me.

Didn't the deer have the hide on it while you were dragging it?

Next time rinse it before you skin it and you only have to rinse the exposed meat. Or you can just trim a thin layer off where the meat has been exposed. Be careful when field dressing to leave as little meat as possible exposed.

Last edited by rockport; 11-26-2018 at 09:47 PM.
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Old 11-27-2018, 04:56 AM
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I have been grinding meat for 10+ years and never heard of semi-freezing before. I havenít had any issues with fridge cold meat, but I will have to try getting it colder. Thanks for the tip Jake.
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