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Newbie hunter, looks for tips for first successful season

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Newbie hunter, looks for tips for first successful season

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Old 02-01-2019, 06:35 PM
  #41  
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Hey,

Your list is pretty solid. Some things you can add are Rubber Gloves, a rangefinder and a fire starter.

Hope it helps.
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:39 AM
  #42  
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Florida Whitetail Experience
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Old 02-02-2019, 09:18 AM
  #43  
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I was trying to figure out the problem with HCO's link and fix it but he beat me to the punch. Then I read the topic he linked to and was amazed at all of the useful info he and a few other members posted. HCO's "Florida Whitetail Experience" has now been stuck at the top of the Whitetail Forum as a resource topic. I have no doubt that it will help a lot of people who are trying to learn how to hunt, how to be a better hunter and many other things. Kudos to HCO for putting in all that time and effort.
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Old 10-19-2019, 10:36 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by fiddypal View Post
Hi guys, newbie here i finally got my hunting license (after an ungodly amount of hours of "hunter education" which was a joke).

Looking for any and all advice so i can have a successful season this year.

I will be hunting out of a stand which is a pretty good size, its maybe 10' up in the air and has a chair for 1 person but you could easily fit 2 people up there and gear. The previous owners had set this stand up so i know its in a good location already.

I have a game camera out right now so i can try and get down the deer timings of when they like to roll through.

I guess my main questions for this thread is what do you guys pack for a day out in the field? Food/Drink are my biggest question marks as i know smell is what will likely give me away to the deer, so what are some good options?

I don't have to trek far from my truck to get to my hunting spot (maybe 300 yards) so weight is not a big issue for me.

My pack list so far:
- Hunting license printed on waterproof paper
- Pen/Pencil and extra sheet of waterproof paper
- Esee 4 Fixed blade knife
- Smaller Morakniv
- Various lengths of paracord
- Rain gear
- Compound Bow & Arrows (how many arrows do i realistically need to bring?)
- gallon of water (for washing when cleaning a deer)
- Headlamp/Flashlights
- Small med kit

I guess my ansewer would be, it depends. On alot of thinga... like how long you stay out, how close to the house you are...

My opening day list for me, 20 yd from my truck...
my gun a few bullets
carried in a backpack to my blind
Couple of sandwhiches and jerky
Big bottle of water, couple of drinks
Empty bottle to piss in
Cover scents
Everything else stays in the truck
ie flashlight rope tape etc..
good luck
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Old 11-01-2019, 06:24 PM
  #45  
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Welcome aboard!

As usual: really depends on blah blah...

I usually hunt on public land, so only use climbing stand only. My gears for climbing stand:

In backpack (10-15 lbs):Water, empty bottle, live-wire, energy bar, doe pee, gloves (2 pairs, thick and thin), face mask, first aid kit, 3-5 rounds cartridges or 3 arrows, deer calls, headlight, batteries, power pack, knife, folding bone saw, disposable gloves, 550 paracord, plastic bags 1-3x, 33gal thick trash bag, screw-in hook, hand warmer.

On body: small folding knife, multi-tool, full body harness, suspension relief, lighter, whisle, cell phone, USB charging cable, keys, pistol, rifle/bow, wallet, deer calls, gear rope. Optional: Trail marker, reflective pins

I usually don't eat or drink for whole day when hunting so no lunch with me. I tie a thin string on my bow/rifle as wind indicator.


Good luck!

Last edited by nhhunter09; 11-01-2019 at 06:27 PM.
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Old 11-12-2019, 07:03 PM
  #46  
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I have some questions too. First is, I just set up a new deer stand, How soon can I get in and hunt? I've seen many opinions, figured I'd try here too
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:43 PM
  #47  
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Hm, nice.
Good luck.
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Old 11-14-2019, 07:02 PM
  #48  
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Default Newbie hunter tips for success

Originally Posted by fiddypal View Post
Hi guys, newbie here i finally got my hunting license (after an ungodly amount of hours of "hunter education" which was a joke).

Looking for any and all advice so i can have a successful season this year.

I will be hunting out of a stand which is a pretty good size, its maybe 10' up in the air and has a chair for 1 person but you could easily fit 2 people up there and gear. The previous owners had set this stand up so i know its in a good location already.

I have a game camera out right now so i can try and get down the deer timings of when they like to roll through.

I guess my main questions for this thread is what do you guys pack for a day out in the field? Food/Drink are my biggest question marks as i know smell is what will likely give me away to the deer, so what are some good options?

I don't have to trek far from my truck to get to my hunting spot (maybe 300 yards) so weight is not a big issue for me.

My pack list so far:
- Hunting license printed on waterproof paper
- Pen/Pencil and extra sheet of waterproof paper
- Esee 4 Fixed blade knife
- Smaller Morakniv
- Various lengths of paracord
- Rain gear
- Compound Bow & Arrows (how many arrows do i realistically need to bring?)
- gallon of water (for washing when cleaning a deer)
- Headlamp/Flashlights
- Small med kit
WELCOME, I will give you advise or “tips” that most veteran hunters live by. Its 37 years in the making from me to you. Good luck hunting!!!

•How much hunting pressure your hunting area gets will make a difference. The difference will be seeing deer or not seeing deer. They can be pressured into becoming nocturnal. The pressure could be you entering the area too often. Or you leaving to much scent behind in your area.
•Things you can do to become invisible to the deers nose. Stay as scent free as possible. Wash clothing in non scented detergent. Don’t gas up your truck the day of your hunt. Wear rubber boots to and from the stand even when not hunting. Don’t touch anything on your way to the stand with your bare hands. Try to enter your stand from the downwind side of where you expect the deer to come from. That being said; Your stand should also ALWAYS be located downwind of what ever set up your hunting. That could be over a bedding area, feeding area or trails.
•Learn the deer vocalization. Get a deer grunt call or doe bleat call. It will up your odds tremendously. Learn when to call and when not to call. Youtube has some good videos that can help you.
•When in stand MOVE VERY SLOWLY even when scratching your nose. Deer will see the slightest movement you make way before you see the deer. If he sees you, you definitely won’t see him.
•As far as what to take into your stand. Your truck is only 300 yds away?
Tip-Take as little as possible. The last thing you need is to be fumbling around with loads of extra gear you don’t need for a short hunt.
•Things you should have other then the obvious: Grunt call, hanger for your bow, flash light, knife, inkpen, clip or pin to attach tag, gutting gloves, rope to pull up bow, safety rope and harness, Winter time: hand warmer packs, The rut: rattle bag or horns, the can call. Raining: extra set of gloves, tree umbrella,
•Stand height should be at least 12-15 foot. Too low and the deer can spot you easily. If 8-10ft. Move slowly or you will get busted.
•When you finally get a deer in shooting range: Hopefully you have been practicing your shooting. Always push your limit when practice shooting. 40-50 yards should be your goal. If you feel confident at 40-50 yds. A deer standing at 20-30 will be a chip shot.
That being said: Always make sure the deer is broadside or slightly quartering away. If the deer doesn’t give you a good shooting position, be ethical and wait for another opportunity. If non come to play, there will aways be another day. Better then making a bad choice shot at crippling or gut shooting the deer.
•When making the shot don’t worry about the deer seeing or hearing you drawing back your bow. Wait for that good body position, draw, “aim small-miss small” release.
•If the deer is walking it’s easier to draw on him undetected because his senses will be compromised. Wait until he is broadside or quartering. If the deer is on full alert I like to wait for his head to go behind a tree when I draw so he can’t see me.
•After you shoot your deer keep your eyes snd ears on him and mentally mark the last place you seen or heard him. It will make it easier to find your deer when tracking the blood trail.
•If you haven’t already done this its a must. Go to youtube and learn proper technique on field dressing a deer. Watch several different ones to learn an easy method for you.
Note: for great tasting and no “wild game” tasting deer meat. It all starts with you and properly handled deer meat from gutting to butchering.
Tip ~ Wild game taste is nothing other then poorly handled deer meat. Or a rutted out buck!
Doe taste better👍 Bucks look nicer😁

GOOD LUCK HUNTING!!!
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Old 11-24-2019, 05:27 PM
  #49  
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What’s been listed here already is a pretty solid list. My biggest piece of advice is if you’re hunting the rut don’t get trapped into thinking you should be focusing on dawn and dusk hours. They will move in cycles constantly looking for does. If you can I highly suggest being out all day. I have shot more than a dozen trophy deer between 10 and 3. It’s actually my favourite time to hunt.
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Old 11-30-2019, 06:55 AM
  #50  
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Welcome to the site, Fiddypal...

I was a "late bloomer" to hunting, as I grew up the youngest, the baby of the family, etc... My dad hunted, all my uncles hunted, my grandpa, etc... back in the 50's. When it was my turn and I came of age, they had all given it up and/or gotten to old to still get out there and enjoy it.

Hunter safety class? I went through it as well back in the day. I had an open mind, even though I was arguably the same age (if not older) than some of the instructors at the time! I found it really interesting and I learned a lot. Even if the firearm training section was a bit redundant (I went through that decades ago in USCG bootcamp), it was good to have a "refresher" and see what I might have missed or what has changed since then.

The best advice I can give is ALWAYS check the wind and your own scent. Deer are masters at detecting even the slightest little thing. Ooooo, the wind shifted on you and you're not wearing any cover scent or anything like that? Pffffftttt... it's all over... Any deer within a square mile will "wind you" and be gone in a flash...

The other thing I learned from some of the grizzled old guys in the mountains of Virginia (i.e. up in the George Washington National Forest)... NEVER go stomping through the woods like a herd of elephants. Never just walk, walk, walk, like a casual stroll either. Deer are so sensitive to movement and sound, they'll still detect you, hear you, and will be gone in a flash. Deer always associate footsteps with a bipedal predator (i.e. Man). I was taught by the "old guys" to slowly step, take another step, pause... step... pause... survey your surroundings... step.. step.. pause... Long story short - if it takes you an hour to walk not even a 1/4 mile, so be it. Do whatever you have to, to minimize your movement.
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