Whitetail Deer Hunting Gain a better understanding of the World's most popular big game animal and the techniques that will help you become a better deer hunter.

Advice on new property

Old 06-02-2015, 07:22 PM
  #11  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 21
Default

Originally Posted by Oldtimr
What you want to do is find a funnel. A place where deer come from several different directions and funnel into one path. That is the area where a stand will pay off.
Originally Posted by super_hunt54
Fresh cut always attracts deer. It lets them get to the low fresh stuff easier. If I were you, I would throw out some Ladino clover into one or both those fields. It will add more protein to their diet and it has a tendency to last 4 to 5 years. Has a great mineral base to it as well.

As far as mineral blocks go, it's sort of a touch and go subject as far as antler growth. Some studies have shown that it doesn't aid in antler growth in deer over 1.5 and others differ from that. What HAS been proven is that phosphorus rich soils produce heavier bodied deer as well as other minerals that aid in the digestive process. It's also been shown to make deer take in more food. So pick a salt block that's high in phosphorus and calcium as well. Don't get a pure mineral lick. Deer will pretty much ignore them. They need salt so get a block that has at LEAST those 2 minerals in them.


Thanks for the advice.

On the clover, do I need to disc up the ground and such? Or can I just cut the current stuff real short and throw it in there?

I've seen some people spray with roundup, and then burn it in 2 weeks. Wasn't sure if that was truly a smart idea or not.

I'm just happy I'm getting to ask these question this early in the year. I've got trail cameras on another property, I will go get them and put them up here in the next week or so.
Jasper912 is offline  
Old 06-02-2015, 09:07 PM
  #12  
Nontypical Buck
 
MudderChuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Germany/Calif.
Posts: 2,664
Default

Most anytime I plant a Clover plot near where the Pines are growing well, I have to Lime the soil. Pines like it acidic, Clover likes it base.
I usually disc it and Lime it.

A mix of Rye and Clover seems to do well together (for awhile). You might have to ask somebody more knowledgeable to figure out the best Clover (or mix) for your soil. My plots tend to peter out after few years. I think the spots I pick out are too wet.

I'm a poor farmer, my only real successes so far has been Corn and Water Cress. Both of which draw a lot of Deer.
I'm trying a mixed plot of Corn and Beans this year.
MudderChuck is offline  
Old 06-02-2015, 09:32 PM
  #13  
Nontypical Buck
 
super_hunt54's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Illinois
Posts: 3,695
Default

Chuck, it's according to what type of clover you are planting. Some like the North Eastern climate Like Ladino while White Clover tends to favor more Southern climates. But only a couple last more than a few years without either re-seeding or a really healthy pollination like having bees put out.

Jasper, some people just throw out clover seed, others disc. It's really according to how "firm" your soil is. Some actually use "mashers" in behind the seeders. Those are weighted rollers that press the seed in. It's up to your soil type and density. I've always used a disc. But one thing you should do is get a soil test. Like Chuck said, most Clover do not like acidity. The tend to like a more neutral base. Also, if you want your fields to last longer, find someone with honey bees to come in. It's fairly cheap and works wonders for a clover field. Not to mention it makes for some great honey! For 2 small fields like you have, a single 4 stack hive should suffice. MAYBE 2. Heck, make your own hive and get you a queen and some drones. Very cheap to do and if you like honey then it's 2 pluses.
super_hunt54 is offline  
Old 06-03-2015, 06:17 AM
  #14  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 21
Default

Neighbor down the road about 1/4 mile has a bee farm, so I am good on that part.

There is some wild clover growing in the field among the weeds right now.

We have great soil here in southern WV. I garden every year, and our soil is very rich in this area. Also, the bigger of the 3 fields floods every couple years such as this last year. Not sure if that matters or not.

The pines are across the creek and up the hill from the field.
Jasper912 is offline  
Old 06-03-2015, 07:45 AM
  #15  
Giant Nontypical
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Allegan, MI
Posts: 8,019
Default

Originally Posted by Jasper912
Neighbor down the road about 1/4 mile has a bee farm, so I am good on that part.

There is some wild clover growing in the field among the weeds right now.

We have great soil here in southern WV. I garden every year, and our soil is very rich in this area. Also, the bigger of the 3 fields floods every couple years such as this last year. Not sure if that matters or not.

The pines are across the creek and up the hill from the field.
Take a close look all along the creek while you're out scouting the property and you'll probably find one or two spots where they are crossing to go back and forth from bedding/feeding areas and you may find a spot to set up a nice tree stand or two to use according to wind direction.
Topgun 3006 is offline  
Old 06-03-2015, 10:13 AM
  #16  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 21
Default

Originally Posted by Topgun 3006
Take a close look all along the creek while you're out scouting the property and you'll probably find one or two spots where they are crossing to go back and forth from bedding/feeding areas and you may find a spot to set up a nice tree stand or two to use according to wind direction.
Great idea for sure. I have a few general places in mind to look.
Jasper912 is offline  
Old 06-04-2015, 02:40 PM
  #17  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 21
Default

So I was up there again today working on the bigger field. Cleaning up the flood debris (small creek flooded over in the Spring,) and some big rocks. I'm doing this so I can take my riding lawn mower through there from now on. Push mowing has been hard, but worst part is it taking multiple days to mow all of it.

Keep in mind, I originally had to tie a rope to my chainsaw, crawl through on my belly, hands, and knees, then pull the chainsaw through and cut the stuff at the base. Thats how thick it was in some places.

All the work has been done with a chainsaw, mowing scythe, axe, and other hand tools. So I am pretty pumped to be able to ride 2 of the 3 fields, including the biggest one lol.

While up there though, in the smaller field (my future yard when I build my house there) I found ALL KINDS of buck poop.

This field is close to 1/2 acre in size. It is bordering the woods to the south and east. To the North side it drops down about a 15 foot drop to this old county/dirt road. Never see vehicles, just the occasional 4-wheeler. There is no houses in behind it, I own the head of the holler.

Once you go across the road, and down a small bank, that is where the biggest field is. On the other side of the field is a creek with deep holes that have water year round. Then it goes up the mountain.

The upper field that is above the dirt road, it seems to be used more, judging by the poop. Also, seems to be almost all buck poop. Could one deer be pooping this much, or is it most likely multiple bucks?

I plan to try and set up a trail cam this weekend to see whats going on.
Jasper912 is offline  
Old 06-04-2015, 02:43 PM
  #18  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 21
Default

One other question about deer tracks. I know how to tell the difference between a buck and a doe and all of that.

One thing I have never been sure of though, is how to tell the direction the deer are headed in. On the doe tracks, is the doe headed in the direction of the wider part of the V or the bottom part of the V. So if this V was a doe track, is the doe heading South or North based on the V.
Jasper912 is offline  
Old 06-04-2015, 02:52 PM
  #19  
Boone & Crockett
 
Oldtimr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: south eastern PA
Posts: 15,302
Default

Deer are moving towards the direction of the open part of the V. Just look at a deers hoof, that will tell you which way the tracks are moving. You can't always tell a bck from a doe by the droppings regardless of what people tell you.
Oldtimr is offline  
Old 06-04-2015, 03:34 PM
  #20  
Nontypical Buck
 
super_hunt54's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Illinois
Posts: 3,695
Default

Originally Posted by Oldtimr
Deer are moving towards the direction of the open part of the V. Just look at a deers hoof, that will tell you which way the tracks are moving. You can't always tell a bck from a doe by the droppings regardless of what people tell you.
Yep. I've seen big ole doe droppings that would shame a buck. You get an older doe that's been feeding heavy and I can tell you there is no difference at all between them and a big buck.

Jasper, it sounds lie you have a nice little piece of property to crack some deer on. Just don't over do the changes too much. While deer aren't that skiddish to SOME changes, if you do too much at once you will chase them away from the property.
super_hunt54 is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.