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Questions for a first time hunter.

Old 12-04-2013, 06:12 AM
  #11  
Typical Buck
 
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since you are so new to hunting, i think youre trying to run before you walk imho. Id definitely lose the e-caller and just get a grunt tube, although probably one of the deadliest calls out there would be to learn to master the fawn bleat.

Id stay clear of the thickets, you dont want to go in to a bucks bedroom and let him know youre around, he will clear out and youll never see him again

there are some awesome books out there on deer hunting, i cant recall the exact name of the one im thinking about, but it has to do with using topography to get you looking for the places bucks go and how they move (its got a picture of a map on the front cover).

Ive never really had much luck calling, i know it can work but it you are in the wrong spot you can call all day and you will never see a thing, better to learn how deer move and why, learn how to scout and set up a good stand, or how to still hunt.

welcome to the wonderful world of hunting, its awesome and i applaud your enthusiasm, good luck
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Old 12-04-2013, 07:25 AM
  #12  
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The first thing I would do is setup with the wind and see what happens.

If that doesn't work then start thinking about what else you can do.
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Old 12-04-2013, 08:25 AM
  #13  
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since you are so new to hunting, i think youre trying to run before you walk imho
That's one way to put it... Another is don't get caught up in the commercialization of hunting... When I started hunting things like scents, and calls were just starting to hit the market... I'll not tell you that scents, and calls aren't effective when used properly, but remember that people have been shooting deer long before any of that kind of stuff ever hit the market.

I would suggest that you keep it simple to start until you learn more about what your doing... I've never needed anymore than a rifle, a box of cartridges, and some common sense to kill deer. Getting caught up in all the commercial hype may lead to more disappointment, and expense, than success.

I know the wind has already been mentioned, but IMHO it can't be mentioned enough... Always remember that the wind can be yer best friend, or yer worst enemy.

Books have also been mentioned, and is a great suggestion but... All the books in the world aren't going to do you any good if you don't get out in the field with them to see what there saying first hand... You've got to put your time in the field in period...

I'm glad that you have enjoyed yer early experiences, but remember that there's a reason it's called hunting, not shooting/killing deer. I'd say "quit buying all the fancy gadgets, and trying to make it easy"... If you ask any successful hunter here they'll tell that they had to put in their time and hard work to achieve that success... Get out in the field and learn, if you do that, success will eventually come too you. Mind you that time in the field isn't just hunting season time... Many here will tell that they put in pre, and post season scouting time to learn whats going on in the areas that they hunt. Many here will also tell you that they enjoy there scouting time as much, if not more than their actual hunting time.

I'm not trying to discourage you, I'm trying to be real... If you want to be a successful hunter, get out there and put in your time.

Good luck, and enjoy the experience.

Last edited by Lunkerdog; 12-04-2013 at 08:37 AM.
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Old 12-04-2013, 08:32 AM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by scottycoyote
since you are so new to hunting, i think youre trying to run before you walk imho. Id definitely lose the e-caller and just get a grunt tube, although probably one of the deadliest calls out there would be to learn to master the fawn bleat.

Id stay clear of the thickets, you dont want to go in to a bucks bedroom and let him know youre around, he will clear out and youll never see him again

there are some awesome books out there on deer hunting, i cant recall the exact name of the one im thinking about, but it has to do with using topography to get you looking for the places bucks go and how they move (its got a picture of a map on the front cover).

Ive never really had much luck calling, i know it can work but it you are in the wrong spot you can call all day and you will never see a thing, better to learn how deer move and why, learn how to scout and set up a good stand, or how to still hunt.

welcome to the wonderful world of hunting, its awesome and i applaud your enthusiasm, good luck
I am going to return the E-caller. and with the other guy talking about gun shots. I think I am just going to basics and just study during bow season. I will try to locate the book you are talking about, or one close to it.

thanks.

if anyone knows of any good crossbows, let me know. I am currently looking at Barnett. (either the Predator or Buck commander). I will be doing elk hunting with a cross bow or gun. I will enter into both, and hope for the gun. But if I only get to do the bow, then I want a good one to take them down.

Last edited by Mashburn; 12-04-2013 at 08:40 AM.
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Old 12-04-2013, 08:39 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Lunkerdog
That's one way to put it... Another is don't get caught up in the commercialization of hunting... When I started hunting things like scents, and calls were just starting to hit the market... I'll not tell you that scents, and calls aren't effective when used properly, but remember that people have been shooting deer long before any of that kind of stuff ever hit the market.

I would suggest that you keep it simple to start until you learn more about what your doing... I've never needed anymore than a rifle, a box of cartridges, and some common sense to kill deer. Getting caught up in all the commercial hype may lead to more disappointment, and expense, than success.

I know the wind has already been mentioned, but IMHO it can't be mentioned enough... Always remember that the wind can be yer best friend, or yer worst enemy.

Books have also been mentioned, and is a great suggestion but... All the books in the world aren't going to do you any good if you don't get out in the field with them to see what there saying first hand... You've got to put your time in the field in period...

I'm glad that you have enjoyed yer early experiences, but remember that there's a reason it's called hunting, not shooting/killing deer. I'd say "quit buying all the fancy gadgets, and trying to make it easy"... If you ask any successful hunter here they'll tell that they had to put in their time and hard work to achieve that success... Get out in the field and learn, if you do that, success will eventually come too you. Mind you that time in the field isn't just hunting season time... Many here will tell that they put in pre, and post season scouting time to learn whats going on in the areas that they hunt. Many here will also tell you that they enjoy there scouting time as much, if not more than there actual hunting time.

I'm not trying to discourage you, I'm trying to be real... If you want to be a successful hunter, get out there and put in your time.

Good luck, and enjoy the experience.
thank you. I am not discouraged one bit. And I feel you and many others are right with the E-caller. I will be taking it back.

I would like to find a good book that tells how deers move and etc. I will be joining the club my friends are in. and plan on adding some honey suckles and mussacidines to the area during post season. they already have corn feeders set up during the off season.


again thank you for being honest with me.
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Old 12-04-2013, 09:03 AM
  #16  
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The book mentioned is Mapping Trophy Bucks Written by: Brad Herndon

Heres a list and you can look them up but a basic one on reading to get started.

1. Mapping Trophy Bucks – Brad Herndon
2. Precision Bowhunting – John & Chris Eberhart
3. Giant Whitetails: A Lifetime of Lessons – Mark & Terry Drury with Mike Hanback
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Old 12-04-2013, 09:43 AM
  #17  
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I remember when I started studying books in the late 80's... I had many old school friends that almost seemed insulted that I was doing so... They'd all say that "you can't learn how to hunt from a book"!!! In one sense they were right... You have to put your time in the field in as well, but... I've learned a heck of a lot from the books I've read.

My books are pretty much region specific so I doubt they'd help you much, but no doubt in this day and age the info for your region is out there.

I should add a caveat to my above post... I'd be lying if I said I haven't spent money on equipment over the years. Things like my GPS(The greatest invention since the compass) ladder stands,Tcams my wheelers/snowmobile etc... But that equipment has been added over many years as I felt it was needed(Okay sometimes wanted) But there's a lot more stuff out there that I haven't and never will buy.

My point is that maybe you should take your time, and buy your equipment as you learn it's value to you... There is some really great and valuable equipment out there to be had, but you need to learn what will work for you threw experience... Just some food for thought.
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Old 12-04-2013, 03:59 PM
  #18  
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We enjoy hunting throughout the year. By that I mean we spend A LOT of time in the woods during every season studying the animals, especially deer, and learning their habits which can change.

We have two daughters who accompany us and it's a genuine thrill for them when we can get near enough for them to get a close-up view of a deer.

Hunting is a much broader activity than just making your kill and the whole thing is very exciting. By the way, the idea of hunting never occurred to me before I met my husband.
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Old 12-05-2013, 06:36 AM
  #19  
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mapping bucks, yeah thats the one

on crossbows you have a lot to choose from. In the old days before most states allowed it, barnetts were kind of looked down on as cheap, and it was horton and parker and maybe a few others. Nowadays i think barnetts improved, i know they got some fast xbows. In the compound style xbow, i think most people consider 10point one of the best, they also have a budget line made by wicked ridge (i believe). I think the only real recurve style availabe by a reputable company is excalibur. Ive had both and they have their pros and cons, right now i have a excalibur exomax. They are all loud but keep your shots inside 30 yards, aim a little low and most deer are going in the freezer.
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Old 12-05-2013, 04:15 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by olsaltydog
The book mentioned is Mapping Trophy Bucks Written by: Brad Herndon

Heres a list and you can look them up but a basic one on reading to get started.

1. Mapping Trophy Bucks Brad Herndon
2. Precision Bowhunting John & Chris Eberhart
3. Giant Whitetails: A Lifetime of Lessons Mark & Terry Drury with Mike Hanback
Thank you so much. this will come in handy. I am about to make a trip to get a Barnett Ghost 400. I found it for 450$ and I could not pass that up. from the pictures and what the owner says, it is in excellent condition.
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