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Help Kansas get the use of tracking dogs for recovering game legalized

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Help Kansas get the use of tracking dogs for recovering game legalized

Old 02-04-2012, 06:21 PM
  #1  
Fork Horn
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Default Help Kansas get the use of tracking dogs for recovering game legalized

Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks is asking for comments on the use of tracking dogs for the recovery of game animals. Please go to:
http://surveys.wp.state.ks.us/prg/Pr...oursim-Surveys ... im-Surveys Enter your KDWP number, and mark that you “Strongly Support” the use of tracking dogs to recover game animals, when you get to that part of the survey.”

Thanks
Ken
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Old 02-05-2012, 04:27 AM
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Doc get a life, go back to a home made bow and arrow and stop using all modern equipment if that is how you feel. Tracking dogs are just another tool in a hunters arsenal that they can use to recover game. I track for other hunters and have done so for 9 years now. I can tell you that there have been plenty of deer that would not have been recovered with out the use of a tracking dog. Here in the south the temps during bow season can be very warm. The difference in a few hrs can make the difference if the meat is good or bad. I have also tracked out to 36 hrs just so the the hunter who had spent many hrs already on his hands and knees looking could get closer on his hunt. I have also track for people who were color blind. It is a proven technique for recovering game that can not be located by eye tracking. Rouffly half the states now allow tracking dogs in one fashion or another with other majior problems.

Ken
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Old 02-05-2012, 02:49 PM
  #3  
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Ken, I do have a life, & if you knew just what kind, you might well be quite envious. I have hunted some pretty rugged areas and have never needed a dog. I haven't hunted Kansas but I have hunted Neb, Colo. and can't see any reason for a dog. Maybe in the swamps of La. or Fl, BUT Kansas!!! come on. (who needs a life???)

Do you think for a minute that people are not going to take a law like that and use it to run deer. of course they are, deer have enough of a problem running from coyotes & wolves they don't need the dogs too.
people who can't hunt are always looking for an edge. most places I hunt if a dog is seen running deer the hunter is encouraged to put the dog down.

If a person can't track a deer maybe they should get a new hobby. I know it is legal in some states, but that doesn't make it right. people who are uncomfortable in the woods can alway go to a game farm or take a fenced hunt. I just can't go with dogs running deer, I prefer baiting to running deer dogs. I would encourage all the members from Kansas to write or log in and strongly oppose this. It is not in your best interest. (jmop) Doc

Last edited by DocD; 02-05-2012 at 04:33 PM.
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Old 02-05-2012, 06:21 PM
  #4  
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Doc do some research. Most states require the dog to be on leash not running the deer as you say. In Ga you are allowed to work a dog of lead but I choose not to. I like to have control of my dog just in case the animal crosses over onto someone elses property. A well trained tracking dog learns to track an individual animal even within a heard. In most states you are only allowed to track on the property you have permission to hunt on and must get permission to go onto anothers property to track. A few states allow the hunter to carry a weapon while tracking, while some forbid it all together. We are allowed to carry a weapon and am graitful as we usually track 3-4 deer a year that are still alive when we find it. There have been very few if any problems with trackers and tracking dogs in the states where it has been allowed.

Are there going to be people that break the law sure, just like know there are poachers and law breakers in every state that call themselves hunters. You and I know they are nothing more than a thief. But you do not punish the real hunters just because of a few bad apples.

You say the deer are under a lot of other presasure I can agree to that. But think of it this way. You get one tag, hunter goes out and wounds a buck but does not recover it. Goes out and hunts again and this time goes home with his buck. He has now infact shot and most likely killed 2 bucks. Which is taking away from the opportunity of other hunters. With a tracking dog that first buck might have been recovered and the hunter would only have taken one buck.

For those that have never had the opportunity to witness what a tracking dog can do or need more info all I ask is do some research before making up your mind. You will find that Tracking dogs for recovering game is an excellent resource that all hunters should have access too.

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Ken
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Old 02-09-2012, 10:29 AM
  #5  
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Yep Ken I filled out my survey last week and marked that one as well as making a crossbow legal for everyone during archery season. All I have to say is if you don't hunt Kansas how in the world would you know if you need a dog to track or not. I don't care where ELSE you may have hunted Ken is 100% right on this one. A tracking dog would have helped me plenty this season.
Live it up! Deerwoods Doug
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Old 02-10-2012, 04:41 AM
  #6  
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How lame can you get? In Pennsylvania it is legal to shoot dogs that are running deer. If you need a dog to track your deer, maybe you should go back to gun hunting.
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Old 02-10-2012, 05:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunplummer View Post
How lame can you get? In Pennsylvania it is legal to shoot dogs that are running deer. If you need a dog to track your deer, maybe you should go back to gun hunting.
That is a totally different thing. We are not talking about using dogs to RUN deer. There are some cases where you need a dog to track lost and wounded animals EVEN the one's shot with rifles. You'd be surprised how quick an animal can dissappear and leave no blood trail. That goes for the one's that are hit hard too. If it takes an animal 100 yrds to start bleeding for whatever reason, the odds are that animal will be lost. ANY thing that can help hunters recover wounded animals is a valuable tool and worth it.
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Old 02-10-2012, 05:53 AM
  #8  
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This is just another example of people piping up and voicing their opinion when they have no facts or basis to back them up. A tracking dog on a leash is not a dog "running deer" and anything that can help find and recover a wounded animal should be used if it's legal.
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:53 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by kswild View Post
Yep Ken I filled out my survey last week and marked that one as well as making a crossbow legal for everyone during archery season. All I have to say is if you don't hunt Kansas how in the world would you know if you need a dog to track or not. I don't care where ELSE you may have hunted Ken is 100% right on this one. A tracking dog would have helped me plenty this season.
Live it up! Deerwoods Doug
I haven't hunted Kansas, but I have been there, (a great state) but I see no reason for tracking dogs. I am not saying everyone would abuse the law but a lot of people would. A dog would have helped me a lot this year also, & last year & the years before that also. My feeling is that if you don't want to hunt, you shouldn't, Tracking your game is part of the hunt. I say go to a game farm where you don't have to track. I don't think deer would qualify for the record book if taken aided by the use of a dog. as to the Crossbow, if a person is disabled then they should be able to use a crossbow. I certainly hope the sportsmen & women of Kansas vote against this idea. I will have to check and see just what the Kansas DNR's position is on this, it can't be good, Doc
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Old 02-10-2012, 08:55 AM
  #10  
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You, Sir, should probably keep your ideas to yourself because it's obvious it's either your way of doing things or it isn't right! The middle of your last post is so much BS it's pathetic when you ramble about not wanting to hunt...yadayadayada! How do you figure a dog on a leash is going to be abused and yet say they would have helped you numerous times? Then this crossbow statement about only if you're disabled is way behind times because more and more states are opening up that opportunity to all and are even extending it to the regular archery seasons. Most all of the states that have allowed crossbows have done studies and found that it is not harming anything as far as overkill etc., and is getting more people into the outdoors, which we certainly need with hunter numbers dwindling across the US. As far as your last sentence, who are you talking about it not being good for? I imagine from the other comments that were made, you mean it won't be good for YOU!!! Ain't that too bad, LOL!

Last edited by Topgun 3006; 02-10-2012 at 08:58 AM.
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