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Cow problems

Old 12-28-2011, 06:51 AM
  #11  
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3 strands of barb wire straight and tight will keep the cows out. I do this on one of the farms I hunt and it always keep them out of my food plots.
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Old 12-28-2011, 01:37 PM
  #12  
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[QUOTE=SouthDakotaHunter;3895048]That fence has more holes than swiss cheese - lol

Looks like it needs to be re-done or your always going to have issues. Wire needs to be very tight - 3 strand minimum - 4 strand preferred.... Deer won't have a problem jumping it. If your concerned you can create a 'crossing point' for them between a couple of sections of fence by taking the 3rd and 4th row then tying them together with a small piece of fencing wire...

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...hvnQqhRumNRNCw


That electric fence was tight, until the cows visited. I twisted the wires close to the tposts together to tighten it and the wires where it crosses and makes an x. I dont want to take it too low, because then the hogs wont be able to go in either. I wouldnt mind feeding the baby cows because they will leave one the herd leaves, but i dont want the bigger cows to be able to get in.

Originally Posted by country1 View Post
I suggest a good four or five row taut barbed wire fence with a single or double strand electric. Make sure all the barbed and electric fencing wires are taut, and the electric fence wire is not right next to a barbed wire. If you use a single strand electric with a four or five row barbed wire fence, try the single stand electric wire at about 40 inches off the ground.

First, how powerful of an electric fencer do you have? Second, make sure the electric fence is not shorted out someplace.

If you have a good electric fence charger, the cattle will not want anything to do with it.
http://www.tractorsupply.com/zareba-...harger-3604497
http://www.tractorsupply.com/zareba-...asedPricingCmd

Thats the charger i have. I have to have something solar powered because there is no power to the property. I feel like if it was a constant shock instead of a variable shock, it would work better.
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Old 12-28-2011, 01:51 PM
  #13  
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ohhh, that aint barb wire?
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Old 12-28-2011, 01:55 PM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by halfbakedi420 View Post
ohhh, that aint barb wire?
no, its electric fence wire.
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Old 12-28-2011, 07:01 PM
  #15  
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take yer electric fence back and get the money, go buy, or ask a nearby farmer for, some barb wire...3 rows on yer tee stakes will be fine. electric wire is for the birds. believe it er not, this is how they keep cows in, here in texas anyways.

Last edited by halfbakedi420; 12-29-2011 at 02:40 PM.
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Old 12-28-2011, 09:24 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by trickworm863 View Post


http://www.tractorsupply.com/zareba-...asedPricingCmd

Thats the charger i have. I have to have something solar powered because there is no power to the property. I feel like if it was a constant shock instead of a variable shock, it would work better.
I clicked on the link for your electric fence charger, and it said it was for pets and small animals. Not an electric fence charger for cattle or horses.

When we had cattle on a pasture with no electricity, we had an electric fence charger that ran off a large automotive 12V battery. This was a single strand electric with a five strand barbed wire. We would swap out the battery with a fully charged battery about every 5 days. Sorry I can't tell you the brand or model. If you go this route, put the battery on a wood block so it is not discharged by the ground. We also had the fence charger itself protected from the weather.

A concern I would have is having the feeder tipped over by the livestock and having the feed container spill its contents. One thing you don't want is sick or dead livestock because they got the wrong feed, too much feed or feed that was not compatible with the other foods they eat. I suggest starting with a very sturdy four or five row barbed wire fence and add one or two rows of electric fence with a reliable electric fence charger that will provide a good jolt.
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Old 12-29-2011, 06:36 AM
  #17  
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One good electric line about 3' high with the right charger will keep the cows out and allow deer over it and hogs under it! That charger just didn't put out enough juice for a cow to even slow down, LOL!
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Old 12-29-2011, 01:31 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by country1 View Post
I clicked on the link for your electric fence charger, and it said it was for pets and small animals. Not an electric fence charger for cattle or horses.

When we had cattle on a pasture with no electricity, we had an electric fence charger that ran off a large automotive 12V battery. This was a single strand electric with a five strand barbed wire. We would swap out the battery with a fully charged battery about every 5 days. Sorry I can't tell you the brand or model. If you go this route, put the battery on a wood block so it is not discharged by the ground. We also had the fence charger itself protected from the weather.

A concern I would have is having the feeder tipped over by the livestock and having the feed container spill its contents. One thing you don't want is sick or dead livestock because they got the wrong feed, too much feed or feed that was not compatible with the other foods they eat. I suggest starting with a very sturdy four or five row barbed wire fence and add one or two rows of electric fence with a reliable electric fence charger that will provide a good jolt.
The charger keeps out all the cows, except one. I think im just gonna move the feeder, and put up a single board so the cow cant just run under it.
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Old 01-01-2012, 06:39 PM
  #19  
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Ok...good word on fense. Now anyone have an idea how to keep turkeys from get to an automatic corn feeder? Have lots of turkeys on property and owner wont let us hunt them...so would alfalfa be the only alternative which wouldn't be a year round deal. Turkeys clean out a release of corn in no time.
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Old 01-02-2012, 06:50 AM
  #20  
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post a picture of this tears thanks giving dinner at turkey eye level...works like a charm.
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