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Lessons you had to learn the hard way.

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Lessons you had to learn the hard way.

Old 11-24-2010, 09:36 AM
  #11  
Nontypical Buck
 
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I just started hunting two years ago, so letís see if I can recall some of the bigger lessons I have learned during this short time period, all of which I have pretty much learned on my own (trial and error).

If using buckshot, triple-check your pattern from 20-50 yards to determine how far you can shoot. Once you are no longer getting at least 4 pellets in a 6-inch circle, youíre out of the gunís effective range. Generally, itís best to avoid using buckshot, except in certain scenarios.

If, on the first shot, your quarry doesnít fall, and you still have a shotÖANY SHOTÖat that animal, take it. Fire until the deer is down. A little lost gunshot meat is better than losing the deer.

If you are not certain that your animal is down for the count, WAIT before tracking. Pushing a wounded animal is the worst thing you can do.

Decide what you will and will not take before you go out. Coming home regretting that you didnít take a specific deer isnít fun. Often times, you have only a moment to make the shot in the woods, and that is not the time to decide.

If a redneck slob hunter wounds a deer (hits in the leg!) and you have to put it down after you have already decided to let it go (not realizing it was wounded at the time), DO NOT give the slob hunter the deer when he comes looking for it. And go ahead and give him a piece of your mind while youíre at it (Is there a hint of regret there? Oh yeah!).

Pack your heavy clothes while youíre hiking in. I now use a military utility belt with suspenders and attach compression sack to it for the heavy clothes. Keeps the sweat from building up under a backpack.

If youíve bought a used bolt action gun, disassemble the bolt and clean it thoroughly before taking it out in the field. Some people feel the need to dump gallons of oil in their bolt to keep it lubed, which will cause it to get sluggish in the cold and MISFIRE, costing YOU a deer.

Buy a pair of binoculars and a harness to go with them.

Be as still as possible when in a stand or sitting on the ground. When you MUST move, be absolutely sure there are no deer near you before doing so, using a pair of binoculars if necessary. They have the most awesome camo around.

Try still hunting for a change when itís rainy, super windy, or especially when itís first starting to snow.

Carry a compass and water at all times.

Thereís no harm in knowing where your exact POI will be a 15, 10 or even 5 yards. Or 5 feet, for that matter.

Always keep an extra knife on your person (not in your pack, not on your utility belt) at ALL times. Same goes with having an extra load/rounds ON YOUR PERSON.

Always keep your gun RIGHT with you, no matter what!
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Old 11-24-2010, 09:48 AM
  #12  
M92
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Originally Posted by 7.62NATO
If you’ve bought a used bolt action gun, disassemble the bolt and clean it thoroughly before taking it out in the field. Some people feel the need to dump gallons of oil in their bolt to keep it lubed, which will cause it to get sluggish in the cold and MISFIRE, costing YOU a deer.
Pick up some LAW. Ive found that even small amounts of normal lube can cause sluggish operation or FTFs in really cold weather. LAW will help solve that problem.
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Old 11-24-2010, 10:46 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by M92
Pick up some LAW. Ive found that even small amounts of normal lube can cause sluggish operation or FTFs in really cold weather. LAW will help solve that problem.
Thanks. The gun is actually fine, now. I just LIGHTLY coated all the bolt parts with Gunzilla (on a Q-tip) before reassembling. There is a HUGE difference, even with the gun at room temperature. The click is something with which to be reckoned.
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Old 11-24-2010, 10:51 AM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by 30-06 deerslayer
7.I set everything out the day before I decide to hunt as if my mother was making sure I had everthing I needed before going to school.I am old now and the mind has a hard time keeping up.
That is a good one. This season, I have taken it a bit further. I keep everything I need for hunting in the trunk of my car (yeah, I'm not a real hunter yet...need a truck!!), neatly organized (well, for me), including my gun (so it heats and cools with the weather and there isn't a possibility of condensation from the shock of going from warm to cold and vice versa). This way, I can go hunting on a whim. You never know when something could drop out of your schedule and you suddenly have an opportunity to hunt.
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Old 11-24-2010, 02:57 PM
  #15  
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Check the fuel and repellent pads on your Thermocell BEFORE leaving the house.
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Old 11-24-2010, 06:53 PM
  #16  
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Couple of things I have learned over the years:
1) Keep a pair of latex gloves in your Backpack, they can be used to keephands dry under gloves, or while cleaning game..
2) a $2.00 knife sharpener is a must,
3) baby wipes... enough said..
4) Bandana or handkercheif, another must
5) wear layers, weather can chage quickly...
6) and the most important..... Enjoy where you are, what your doing and who your doing it with... Life is too short to hunt with A$$ho!es.....
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Old 11-24-2010, 07:34 PM
  #17  
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The things I learned the hard way.
1. If your using a pump shotgun,pumping out all the shells don't mean its unloaded,
always check the tube and make sure! That one cost me!
2. Don't ride with your buddy who smokes like a chimney!
3. Always carry an extra pair of socks!
4. If your going to sit all day,bring sunglasses!
5. And last one a freind learned the hard way ALL WAYS check your muzzel if you slip and fall!
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Old 11-24-2010, 07:41 PM
  #18  
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1. Make sure you have your wallet (assuming thats where you keep your license)
2. Keep extra flashlight (as said before)
3. Dont forget cell phone (frusterating when you get stranded)

Just a few experiences ive learned from...
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Old 11-24-2010, 08:17 PM
  #19  
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HUGE LESSON LEARNED YESTERDAY...

Unless you are 100% sure a shotgun is all you need...then bring your high powered rifle..cost me dearly yesterday...

Last edited by Chuck7; 11-24-2010 at 08:19 PM.
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Old 11-25-2010, 02:14 AM
  #20  
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Just yesterday this happened but did not cost me a deer luckly
make sure you put the primer on the gun when muzzle shooting
went out hunting for a few hours only to find when i got back to the truck to unload
that i forgot to put the primer on. that could have cost me a big buck
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