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-   -   Venison temperature sitting on the butcher block. (https://www.huntingnet.com/forum/whitetail-deer-hunting/334463-venison-temperature-sitting-butcher-block.html)

the blur 11-18-2010 02:33 PM

Venison temperature sitting on the butcher block.
 
I picked up a deer at a refrigator box this morning. 38 degree's in the fridge.

It's 60 degree's outside. I come along, get a deer from the fridge box. (shot 3 days ago.) Drive 2 hours to my town, drop the deer at a local back yard shade tree butcher. He butchers in his garage. No refrigator on site.

9 hours later I get the call to pick up the meat. give him $100 for butchering.
I have my IR temp gun.
All the meat is at 53-54 degree's. and I assume it has been at 50 degrees for many hours sitting on his work bench.

Is this meet any good ?
He says it's no problem, but 53 degree's for butched meat for hours sitting out. He's a 1 man show, takes his time. I'm not sure what to do with 53 degree venison.....

Govt Mule 11-18-2010 02:54 PM

oh my, thats a bit warm in my opinion. I wouldn't feel too good about eating it. And a hundred bucks sounds awful steep for processing.

tsaxybabe 11-18-2010 05:46 PM

It should be fine. My deer hung for three days in a basement when it was in the 50s outside and it was fine.

itsslow98 11-19-2010 12:50 AM

100 bucks for a backyard under the table butcher seems way steep. For a deer that field dresses over 150lbs our butcher charges 90 bucks to do everything and that includes ground with beef fat.

For the temperature i wouldnt worry about it, as long as it doesnt smell bad or look bad id eat it. Might be the last time i go there though.

VAhuntr 11-19-2010 01:46 AM


Originally Posted by the blur (Post 3724617)
I picked up a deer at a refrigator box this morning. 38 degree's in the fridge.

It's 60 degree's outside. I come along, get a deer from the fridge box. (shot 3 days ago.) Drive 2 hours to my town, drop the deer at a local back yard shade tree butcher. He butchers in his garage. No refrigator on site.

9 hours later I get the call to pick up the meat. give him $100 for butchering.
I have my IR temp gun.
All the meat is at 53-54 degree's. and I assume it has been at 50 degrees for many hours sitting on his work bench.

Is this meet any good ?
He says it's no problem, but 53 degree's for butched meat for hours sitting out. He's a 1 man show, takes his time. I'm not sure what to do with 53 degree venison.....


If it is bad you should be able to smell it and tell. I have to agree with the others though on the cost of the butchering, as it seems too high to me.

Valentine 11-19-2010 03:23 AM

You wonder some times . . .
 
if a lot of big city hunters will meet their end, because no butcher is available. Or not available nearby.

With modern society, hunter, butcher, and chef in one person, seems to be a total rarity. One like that would know if the meat was good.

nysmoker 11-19-2010 09:18 AM

My family has never paid to butcher a deer ... i have been with friends that have taken deer to be butchered . I got to tell you guys I would be scared myself.That being said temps sound a little warm and not knowing how long it was dead before the butcher got it and the condition of the meat as it was handled ...how clean the butcher is ...... so on and so forth .... id be cooking everything to 180 degrees and well done.Now this is just my opinion ... for what its worth... not saying anybody did something wrong ... the butcher was wrong... the hunter did something wrong or anybody else s post was wrong ...:biggrin:

halfbakedi420 11-19-2010 09:39 AM

man, i would so worry...i never let anyone touch my meat, but me!!
that way i know exactly what was done...aint gotta worry about the backyard butchers runny nose either, or how far off the porch from the meat did he go to take a leak, and weather or not there was a sink, with hot water, and SOAP, on the way back to cutting your meat.

UncleNorby 11-19-2010 11:28 AM

I'm sure it's fine.

halfbakedi420 11-19-2010 12:33 PM


Originally Posted by UncleNorby (Post 3725185)
I'm sure it's fine.

translation...if ya eat and and we hear from ya again, it was ok, but if you die, no one will come and tell us, and everyone will assume you lived.

elkmaster101 11-19-2010 12:54 PM

not a problem,
hang mine i the garage the concrete keeps it cool in the day even if it hits 80's out side.

i have butchered well over a 150 deer of my own in the last 42 year of shooting deer.
never have taken one to a locker.

halfbakedi420 11-19-2010 03:56 PM


Originally Posted by elkmaster101 (Post 3725224)
not a problem,
hang mine i the garage the concrete keeps it cool in the day even if it hits 80's out side.

i have butchered well over a 150 deer of my own in the last 42 year of shooting deer.
never have taken one to a locker.

80? lol kidding right.
hope noone takes this seriously

Bocajnala 11-19-2010 04:19 PM

^^ That's legit. I hunt with a guy that has an old wine cellar, and he hangs them in there regardless of outdoor temperature. Keeps them cool enough for him to have time to deal with them. Don't discredit someone unless you know the details.
-Jake

Rhody Hunter 11-19-2010 04:52 PM

I would find a new butcher. being at room temps for that long you are running the risk of problems . to many hunters hang there deer to age in to high of temps. that is not aging but roting . they get away with it somtimes or killed by cooking. I also see a lot of peoples kitchen that are not sanatary and i would not eat there
Next time butcher yourself

wvnimrod 11-19-2010 05:19 PM

Maybe this will help!

http://www.birdflumanual.com/resourc...onAgeUWI03.pdf

kyslayer 11-20-2010 03:53 PM

I pay 55 dollars to get my deer butchered. Been taking them to the same place as long as i have hunted and have had zero problems. Its a reputable business and they take care of my stuff and i always get clean meat back especially since i skin myself and hose everything down before they get it.

kellyguinn 11-20-2010 04:12 PM

I have been taking mine to a butcher but will be buying a grinder this weekend and starting to learn to do my own. Any of yall know some good books detailing where to make the cuts?

the blur 12-24-2010 06:06 AM

I'm still alive, and doing well. :party0005:

sea_bee77 12-24-2010 08:40 AM

nothing wrong with the meat. i have butchered plenty of deer that have set that long in 50 temps. ive even had some that have set in 70 temps that i was worried about and had no problems. i agree with previous post that you will be able to smell the meat and tell.

LKNCHOPPERS 12-24-2010 08:46 AM

Just inspect your meat. I doubt you will have a problem.

A11en 12-24-2010 07:49 PM

Bacteria begins to grow at temperatures above 41 degrees and below 140 degrees - called the "danger zone" in the world of food safety. If meat remains in the danger zone for longer than 2 hours, you begin to run the risk of dangerous level of bacteria growing on the meat, which could lead to illness. While illness isn't always the result, the quality of the meat is almost always impacted.

I butcher my own deer. If its above 40, I quarter the deer and put it in my fridge, lettting it age for 5 days before butchering it into steaks, roast, etc.

SecondChance 12-27-2010 08:50 AM

My dad just retired this past July 8th with 50 years as a meat cutter and has all 10 finger nails!!!!!! He has spent the past 17 years in a climate controlled meat cutting area that was kept at 50 degrees all the time. That was by the FDA rules and regulations.
That and he did and still does his own processing at home. He just keeps the deer packed with ice, on the concrete floor and has never had to throw any meat away due to spoilage from his part. We have kept deer upto 5 days like this and no problems, they were our own deer!!!
The biggest factor on meat spoilage is the original handeler making sure the meat is both clean and not full of leaves and debris from the timber used to wipe it out and make sure it is placed on ice or into a cooler to get it cooled off ASAP. We did this for thousands of people who brought deer for him to process at his store and house and has never even heard of anyone getting sick from it. This was/is in a rather small town so we would have heard of it for he is well known for his deer processing around the area.

Scottdnramember 12-27-2010 05:33 PM

I think it will be fine if it passes the snif test. And about that $100...you know the cost of a couple deer and you can get your own equipment and then some. I used to hunt at a farm that would do deer butchering for $75. After I saw how they handled the meat, no way I let those guys do my deer. Way more stuff went into their grinder than goes in mine. I'm way picky and I'd put my meat quality against the beef at the grocery store any day. On the other hand I figure it's about 8 hours more or less work from the time a deer hits the ground to when he's cut, ground, sliced up packaged and froze. I do mine over 3 days in cool conditions with meat kept cool. mine usually soaks overnight in a big sink at some cool temp near 40-50*F with some salt in the water. Anything not already packed gets packed the next morning and anything that will be ground gets cut up and refrigerated overnight to be ground the following day. On occasion it will stay an extra day in the fridge. Cut up and covered tight with plastic wrap. After grinding in the feezer it goes in #2 Ziplock freezer qt bags.

the blur 07-20-2011 06:15 AM

It's 8 months later, and I ate most of it. It is all perfectly fine. I was surly concerned about it, with the high temps, but absolutly nothing was wrong.

PY Antlers 07-20-2011 07:24 AM

if you eat the meat raw there might be a problem, but as long as it's cooked your good to go.

A11en 07-20-2011 07:41 PM

If that buthcer were regulated by the government, he'd be closed for business. Food born illness bacteria begins to grow between 41 and 140 degrees (call the danger zone) after just 2 hours. 50 degree + for more than two hours - just asking for trouble. Sure, people have done it, its just a risk I won't take with my family.

Our bow season starts in September and its still 80 degrees out. I'll have my deer quartered and in the fridge within two hours of harvesting it. I let the quarters age for 7-9 days in our extra fridge before butchering it. GOOD STUFF!!!

deerdust 07-21-2011 12:04 AM

It really isn't hard to process your own deer. If you go on ebay and search for meet grinders, you can a find a good 2000- 3000 watt grinder for less than $100. I bought one of each last yr and gave the 2000 to a friend. :) With one of this wattage, you can process a deer in less than 2 hrs. as burger. Cut your backstrap into steaks, and save a few roast if you want from the hind quarters. I still have the grinder that was given to me yrs ago, as I am reluctant to be that mean to anyone. It is just a wallyworld special, 150 watts. It will grind your deer, but you will spend a day doing it. lol I guess I need to find someone I don't like to give it to. lmao Anyone wants it, give me a holler.

deerdust 07-21-2011 12:07 AM

BTW, you want one that is preferably 2 speed and reverse. Also check that it comes with the sausage attachments.

MZS 07-21-2011 04:20 AM

My procedure for deer shot in warmer weather (temps over 45) is to quarter the deer after immediately skinning and put the sections in the freezer overnight to quickly cool them and perhaps partially freeze. Then, I cut off steaks and loin the next day and debone the rest for hamburger. The deboned meat is immediately refrigerated and even partially frozen and then taken to a butcher that I know will immediately refrigerate. It takes no effort for the butcher to toss your bags full of meat in the cooler where as if they have to skin or process a whole animal, it might sit around for a while. Once I took meat to a different butcher and walked into the back room where I saw my first "green" venison (yikes) scraps lying around!

I know that what I do sounds a bit extreme, but with small kids in our house, I never wanted to chance food poisoning. It's also nice not to have to worry so much if a hamburger is not cooked quite all the way through.

mortalcare 07-21-2011 05:32 PM


Originally Posted by halfbakedi420 (Post 3725115)
man, i would so worry...i never let anyone touch my meat, but me!!
that way i know exactly what was done...aint gotta worry about the backyard butchers runny nose either, or how far off the porch from the meat did he go to take a leak, and weather or not there was a sink, with hot water, and SOAP, on the way back to cutting your meat.

lol my dad used to work at tyson and let me tell ya....you shud NEVER eat market meat....i cant imagine what he could do thats worse then what they do at those places........

superstrutter 07-21-2011 06:43 PM

Personally I wouldn't have eaten it, but I'm very picky when it comes to may things, especially cleaning, processing, and cooking wild game and fish. That's why I clean and process everything myself. I do sometimes have sausage made at a local store, but I know the people and trust them. I bring the two hind quarters and they immediately put them in the cooler. I'm glad it didn't hurt you, but I wouldn't push my luck. Some things are just not worth the risk. When I kill a deer, I clean it immediately, cut the backstraps and inner loins out, quarter the rest and put everything on ice. I keep it on ice for two or three days before processing. Some said just cook the meat thoroughlly. That won't matter if the meat is already spoiled. If it smells after cooking it, don't eat it.

Alsatian 07-26-2011 01:05 PM


Originally Posted by A11en (Post 3825605)
If that buthcer were regulated by the government, he'd be closed for business. Food born illness bacteria begins to grow between 41 and 140 degrees (call the danger zone) after just 2 hours. 50 degree + for more than two hours - just asking for trouble. Sure, people have done it, its just a risk I won't take with my family.

Don't mean to beat up on you A11en, but I want to analyze these statements which are fairly common and not unique to you.

What temperature is the deer at when it is killed? I reckon about 98 degrees. How long does it take to get that deer meat down to 41 degrees -- outside the "danger zone" -- starting from the moment the deer is dead? If you are bow hunting, aren't you supposed to give the deer 30 minutes to die? If it died off in the bush immediately, you lose 30 minutes before you even pull out your knife to field dress your deer. Say it takes you 10 minutes to field dress, 15 minutes to collect your gear and drag it to your truck, 35 minutes to drive to and get the deer checked in at a check station. Your time line is 1.5 hours when you pull out of the check station, and there are no unrealistic times in this time line so far. Meanwhile your deer is sitting hide-on in the back of your pick-up truck, outdoors, where it might be kind of warm, particularly if it is bow season. When you pop that baby into a locker at the butchers it isn't going to instantly assume the stable temperature of that locker. What if any of these time lines are extended? I think some of these numbers are excessively cautious and set up by government for butchering plants.

Why does bacteria begin growing only after 2 hours? Of course the bacteria begins growing immediately. Bacteria growth is a continuous process, its growth rate slows progressively at progressively cooler temperatures. I'm sure bacteria growth at 50 degrees is much slower than bacteria growth at 90 degrees.

When beef cattle are killed . . . how long is it before that big old side of beef is cooled down to 41 degrees?

No meat is bacteria free. The question is how much bacteria is present. Too much damages the meat and may make you sick. Frankly, I think the risk of damaging the meat and making it taste bad is worse than the risk of making you sick.

People kill elk on mornings with temperatures headed to 50+ degrees outside -- and elk are big animals -- so I think the meat of these animals probably won't get down to 41 degrees until maybe 10 PM at night after a 10 AM kill, presuming the animal is gutted and quartered. I don't think that would be an unusual situation whatsoever.

As far as the cost for butchering. It is a market driven thing. If you can find someone to do it cheaper, go for it. It takes me from 3-4 hours to skin, quarter, and butcher a smallish deer. $25/hour doesn't seem exhorbitant. I field dress, skin, quarter, butcher, and cook my own deer and elk meat.

A11en 07-26-2011 07:30 PM


Originally Posted by Alsatian (Post 3827277)
Don't mean to beat up on you A11en, but I want to analyze these statements which are fairly common and not unique to you.

What temperature is the deer at when it is killed? I reckon about 98 degrees. How long does it take to get that deer meat down to 41 degrees -- outside the "danger zone" -- starting from the moment the deer is dead? If you are bow hunting, aren't you supposed to give the deer 30 minutes to die? If it died off in the bush immediately, you lose 30 minutes before you even pull out your knife to field dress your deer. Say it takes you 10 minutes to field dress, 15 minutes to collect your gear and drag it to your truck, 35 minutes to drive to and get the deer checked in at a check station. Your time line is 1.5 hours when you pull out of the check station, and there are no unrealistic times in this time line so far. Meanwhile your deer is sitting hide-on in the back of your pick-up truck, outdoors, where it might be kind of warm, particularly if it is bow season. When you pop that baby into a locker at the butchers it isn't going to instantly assume the stable temperature of that locker. What if any of these time lines are extended? I think some of these numbers are excessively cautious and set up by government for butchering plants.

Why does bacteria begin growing only after 2 hours? Of course the bacteria begins growing immediately. Bacteria growth is a continuous process, its growth rate slows progressively at progressively cooler temperatures. I'm sure bacteria growth at 50 degrees is much slower than bacteria growth at 90 degrees.

When beef cattle are killed . . . how long is it before that big old side of beef is cooled down to 41 degrees?

No meat is bacteria free. The question is how much bacteria is present. Too much damages the meat and may make you sick. Frankly, I think the risk of damaging the meat and making it taste bad is worse than the risk of making you sick.

People kill elk on mornings with temperatures headed to 50+ degrees outside -- and elk are big animals -- so I think the meat of these animals probably won't get down to 41 degrees until maybe 10 PM at night after a 10 AM kill, presuming the animal is gutted and quartered. I don't think that would be an unusual situation whatsoever.

As far as the cost for butchering. It is a market driven thing. If you can find someone to do it cheaper, go for it. It takes me from 3-4 hours to skin, quarter, and butcher a smallish deer. $25/hour doesn't seem exhorbitant. I field dress, skin, quarter, butcher, and cook my own deer and elk meat.

Alsatian, Don't worry, I never feel "beat up" by the un-informed.

In your effort to caculate the time it takes me to get a deer out of woods, you've made several inaccurate assumptions about my hunting routine.

- I bow hunt in a maple / oak flat with great visibility and almost always see the deer drop in sight of my stand. Occasionally they go just out of sight (60+ yards) but I typically recover them within 30 minutes of the shot.

- I don't field dress deer in the woods, I do it when I butcher them hanging in my backyard

- We don't take deer to a check station. Our state simply requires we call it in via phone

- I bow hunt 500 yards from my house - and am able to recover the deer and gear with my jeep

So when I said from shot to fridge (quartered) in 2 hours, I ment 2 hours. When I rifle hunt, the tempuratures are usually much more forgiving - but even then, I will typically have the deer quartered and on ice in the cooler within a couple hours.

I'm not going to debate you on the food safety danger zone as it is a well know fact for those with formally educated in this area. I'm also not saying you can't eat the deer if you don't follow food safetly guidlines. I just choose not to take the risk.


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