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Old 11-12-2010, 08:06 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by halfbakedi420
mr.wild,
in no way is it better to start pushing a deer when its wounded.
but to each their own i guess.
i have lost 1 deer, and its because i pushed her. she jumped the creek onto lands i had no business being on. had i waited a lil longer, i would have that perfect record.
as lots of young hunters look to these forums to help them be a better hunter, i hope they take what you say with a grain of salt.
And I can say the opposite had I started the recovery process sooner I might have been able to see where the deer went instead of relying only on a blood trail that ended 60 yrds away. And after searching for over 3 hrs resulted in Zip. I do not try to push the deer, I stay a good distance kinda like a spot and stalk hunt. I'm not gonna run right after the deer like some crazy man.
Just try to keep the deer in my sight. Which is hard here too with thick under brush and grass taller than I am. Every situation is different and young hunters can and will learn from their own experiences and hopefully will do what works the best for their area. And no offense but if you only lost 1 deer you must not have hunted very much. And if you have very good for you! The statics speak volumes out of 908 deer hit 162 were not recovered, in the research area. So give me your thoughts on why that is!!!
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Old 11-12-2010, 08:22 AM
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You guys must not understand my meaning. I said I'll pursue the deer at the RISK of pushing it. I'm still hunting and stalking the wounded animal. I'm not talking about walking through the woods like taking a stroll at the mall on Sunday. Stealth mode. Slow going, watching the animal and if you see it lay down stop and watch it. Even if the animal screams out of there as fast as they can go I'll still take it slow and try to locate the animal again. I have had this work for me and have even been able to put a second shot into wounded animals which if I had not started pursuing them when I did they would have no doubt wondered off miles from where they were first hit, and become another statistic of unrecovered deer because the blood trail ends and they are long gone. Maybe this explains it better!
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Old 11-12-2010, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by kswild
The statics speak volumes out of 908 deer hit 162 were not recovered, in the research area. So give me your thoughts on why that is!!!
Live it up! Doug
My guess is the less experience bowhunters made poor decisions which include taking bad shots and/or pushing the deer and not letting it bed down, bleed out and die.

Here's a quote taken from page 34 (4 of 4) on the link you posted:

"Secondly, a group of volunteer trackers provided help to any bowhunter requesting assistance with locating a hit deer. Experienced trackers could help novice bowhunters avoid mistakes that could affect deer recovery, such as taking up a blood trail too soon after a poor hit."
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Old 11-12-2010, 10:32 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Doubled 150
My guess is the less experience bowhunters made poor decisions which include taking bad shots and/or pushing the deer and not letting it bed down, bleed out and die.

Here's a quote taken from page 34 (4 of 4) on the link you posted:

"Secondly, a group of volunteer trackers provided help to any bowhunter requesting assistance with locating a hit deer. Experienced trackers could help novice bowhunters avoid mistakes that could affect deer recovery, such as taking up a blood trail too soon after a poor hit."
Yea I saw that and there is no dispute that is common knowledge. On a good hit that could be ideal, but on poor hits with the chance of the wounded animal continuing to leave the area and with little or no blood trail and many in need of a second shot, what works for me is trying to keep the animal in sight. Still the statistics speak for themselves.
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Old 11-12-2010, 01:13 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by kswild
When you lose the blood trail for whatever reason, the odds of you finding your deer go down to less than five percent.... depending on the terrain you are hunting. I believe you should.. if possible, never let the deer get out of your sight. I will continue to track a wounded animal immediately after the shot, even at the risk of pushing it. At least I can see where it is going and not risk losing the blood trail and not knowing where the animal went. Thoughts?
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now your saying it works for you, but from your original post it is suggesting that everyone should push their deer, keeping it in sight, as to not let it get away. and this is definitely a "no no" when making an attempt at recovering game that is wounded and hasnt gone down somewhat "immediately".
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Old 11-12-2010, 01:31 PM
  #26  
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I dont chase, but I will follow quietly. If i see the deer ahead, I stop till it moves again. I first watch and see as long as i can. I usually hunt smaller areas of land. 80 acres or less. The deer go to the beds when wounded bad. Its the safe place for them, and they are stressed out. I also look near water for gut shots if they happen. If all else fails, get a dog on him and leave the bow at the truck. I dont loose many, maybe 1 in 20 that I shoot each year.
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Old 11-12-2010, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by halfbakedi420
now your saying it works for you, but from your original post it is suggesting that everyone should push their deer, keeping it in sight, as to not let it get away. and this is definitely a "no no" when making an attempt at recovering game that is wounded and hasnt gone down somewhat "immediately".
Ya know it gets real old Always having to repeat myself I don't know if you just can't read or what but here is the original post:
Originally Posted by kswild
When you lose the blood trail for whatever reason, the odds of you finding your deer go down to less than five percent.... depending on the terrain you are hunting. I believe you should.. if possible, never let the deer get out of your sight. I will continue to track a wounded animal immediately after the shot, even at the risk of pushing it. At least I can see where it is going and not risk losing the blood trail and not knowing where the animal went. Thoughts?
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------------------------------------------------------------------
Do you understand if possible? Do you understand even at the RISK? I suggest nowhere that people should push their deer. I am saying when I pursue a wounded animal immediately after the shot I do so even at the RISK of pushing the deer. Over and over again I say from post #2
We all know that not all blood trails are the same. Even deer that have been hit well and hard might not have a good blood trail for one reason or another. And we all know that individual deer react differently after being shot... some might run like crazy, where others may jump only a few yards stop and stand there. Keeping a visual on your wounded animal is far better IMO than trying to rely on tracking from a blood trail that may or may NOT lead you to your game which is some cases may require a second shot. Some have said using dogs but that is not legal in all states. So I say again FOR ME I would rather take the risk of pushing a deer in order to keep it in sight then you have 2 things working not only do you have the blood trail but also a visual on your game. If you choose to wait 10 minutes before tracking all you have is a blood trail that could be good or your worst nightmare being the blood goes so far and then NOTHING. We have read it many, many times. I won't wait. Yes I have lost gut shot deer by pushing them BUT I'd would rather lose them that way other than waiting and never finding them because of a bad blood trail. And if I'm going to lose one I'm going down swinging!
Live it up! Doug
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
From my 2nd post on this thread I say FOR ME! So please take the time to READ my posts before commenting and trying to make it look like I'm changing my position cause I am not.
Live it up! Doug










Last edited by kswild; 11-12-2010 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 11-12-2010, 02:24 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by kswild
When you lose the blood trail for whatever reason, the odds of you finding your deer go down to less than five percent.... depending on the terrain you are hunting. I believe you should.. if possible, never let the deer get out of your sight. I will continue to track a wounded animal immediately after the shot, even at the risk of pushing it. At least I can see where it is going and not risk losing the blood trail and not knowing where the animal went. Thoughts?
Live it up!
Doug
its very noticible you will keep defending yourself, but its in black and white right here, where you wrote it.
this is what you should not do.
maybe me asking you to take the advise myself and others are trying to share with you, but i have a feeling that is alot to ask for. i am not going to continue posting on this thread as i feel what i type is not sinking in, and ya cant teach an old dog new tricks. good day.
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Old 11-12-2010, 06:49 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by npaden
I personally see a lot more posts on "I started tracking my deer/elk/etc. and jumped it" than I see "I lost the blood trail and never found it".
lhttp://www.huntingnet.com/forum/whitetail-deer-hunting/333973-nervous.html
Here ya go another case of a hunter watching his wounded deer run off then waits a couple hours to track and finds zip, zero. No blood. No arrow, No deer. I personally see more of these posts than someone saying they jumped their wounded deer. Just sayin! My azz is tracking that deer right away! I gonna find something. But that's just me. Even though everyone says " That's the wrong thing to do." "That's a no no." Right or wrong in your eyes it works for me. I never could see the logic in not trying to finish the hunt and put a second arrow in your game if need be. You guys say "No I'm gonna shot 1 time then wait 2 hours and hope the animal dies and I hope I can find a blood trail and I hope I can find my deer." Not me I'm finishing the hunt.
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Old 11-12-2010, 07:03 PM
  #30  
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You had to know that you would get this reaction when posting this thread.
Personally I agree with giving them time before taking up the trail.
I find it hard to believe you havnt lost more deer to pushing them than waiting awhile.
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