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Anybody have to look away as their deer dies?

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Anybody have to look away as their deer dies?

Old 11-02-2010, 03:17 PM
  #41  
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I hate the animal suffering, and it is difficult to watch.But even animals that appear fatally hit have gotten up and run off. I recommend not taking your eyes off it for a second, and if at all in doubt, quickly finish it off with a well placed shot. I prefer right at the base of the head at the top of the spine. It isnt overly messy and is a sure instantaneious death without any more meat wasted.
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Old 11-02-2010, 03:18 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by doall hunter
I definantly Agree With you. I wrote a research paper on why hunting is needed in today's society(got a 93 from a teacher who was not a fan for hunting, Said, "I opended her eyes") One of my points was that its a hunters reponsibility to take a clean ethical shot. Rather than a wolf or other predator take the animal down and start eating it while it is still alive. I also understand your point of the situation where you couldnt take another shot. Could you have gotten out of the stand?
Well i could have but I knew it was a good kill shot and I didn't want to get down and risk pushing the deer. Plus even had I gotten down from the stand the animal would have died by the time I made it to it. I mean it wasn't a slow death by any means, and it was a double lung shot, but just the sounds the deer made bothered me a little bit. It was a well calculated shot and was right on the mark, therefore I stayed in the stand and let the deer pass away on its own time. I think that's how I would want to go if it were me.
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Old 11-02-2010, 04:45 PM
  #43  
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This blog takes me back 12yrs with my son and his first deer. He was 9 and wanted to hunt with me. Got all the proper paper work and lic. Had seen me take several species of animale over the years. Got him in the stand, sitting right in front of me in elevated platform.
A nice 6 pt comes along and stops just as I told him they would at the fence before jumping over to the field. He lines up his 20 ga slug gun and just as I tell him to shoot again, he finally does.
Buck flips over fence to lands flat. My son almost steps off the stand if he were not tied to me and I to the tree!!!!! We get down and begin to walk towards the deer. As we begin to get close, the deer begins to bawl. My son horrified and I amazed it took this long, begins to cry. I tell him that he started this and now has to finish it and to put a round into the chest, realizing it was hit in the spine. He now hands me the gun and sprints the 300 yds back to the house. I take my knife and finish the task. It took him 4 years to get back into the hunt mode again and it messed with his head so much, he made himself forget it!!! That has been 12 years ago and he has taken several deer since and no problems I am aware of. He has taken many other species without batting an eye either.
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Old 11-02-2010, 06:39 PM
  #44  
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Funny you say that secondchance. I killed my first deer with my dad when I was about 9 or 10 as well, and while my excitement kept me from getting that upset, the fact that I took it's life did hit me pretty hard, and that deer seemed to die instantly with no suffering at all. What was bad was that this doe was with a group of four other does and a fawn. After I shot the doe, the others ran about 20 yards and stopped. Three of them then turned around and walked straight back to the doe I shot, and were just looking at it and nudging it with their noses. I know that's all part of hunting, but that's a tough pill to swallow when you're a 10 year old kid that is an animal lover. Even as my dad taught me to field dress it, the other does never left. They stood about 60 yards away and just kept watching us. It wasn't until we began loading the deer on the four-wheeler that they trotted back into the woods. I asked my dad why the other deer didn't run away when I shot and I remember his response just like it was yesterday, "Because those other deer were her friends son."... I think that might have even made kswild feel a touch of sadness. haha
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Old 11-02-2010, 06:58 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Maddog10
Funny you say that secondchance. I killed my first deer with my dad when I was about 9 or 10 as well, and while my excitement kept me from getting that upset, the fact that I took it's life did hit me pretty hard, and that deer seemed to die instantly with no suffering at all. What was bad was that this doe was with a group of four other does and a fawn. After I shot the doe, the others ran about 20 yards and stopped. Three of them then turned around and walked straight back to the doe I shot, and were just looking at it and nudging it with their noses. I know that's all part of hunting, but that's a tough pill to swallow when you're a 10 year old kid that is an animal lover. Even as my dad taught me to field dress it, the other does never left. They stood about 60 yards away and just kept watching us. It wasn't until we began loading the deer on the four-wheeler that they trotted back into the woods. I asked my dad why the other deer didn't run away when I shot and I remember his response just like it was yesterday, "Because those other deer were her friends son."... I think that might have even made kswild feel a touch of sadness. haha
What salty old Kswild feel sad? Hey if you want truthful answers without sugar coating to the tough questions you can always count on Kswild to deliver. Because the truth and reality are always a little on the harsh side. It's called being a MAN. I can not tell you how many times I wish the grown ups I looked up to would have been straight and told me the plain hard truth of things instead of sugar coating things. Even if the truth hurts, the truth is always best. I don't get sad butchering a hog that I kill why would I a deer? They are food. Deer are beautiful animals in the wild and put on this earth for us to eat. If I had these guilty feelings for killing them I would not hunt. I will not apologize for being the predator that I am. Salt and all!
Live it up! Doug
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Old 11-02-2010, 07:05 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by kswild
What salty old Kswild feel sad? Hey if you want truthful answers without sugar coating to the tough questions you can always count on Kswild to deliver. Because the truth and reality are always a little on the harsh side. It's called being a MAN. I can not tell you how many times I wish the grown ups I looked up to would have been straight and told me the plain hard truth of things instead of sugar coating things. Even if the truth hurts, the truth is always best. I don't get sad butchering a hog that I kill why would I a deer? They are food. Deer are beautiful animals in the wild and put on this earth for us to eat. If I had these guilty feelings for killing them I would not hunt. I will not apologize for being the predator that I am. Salt and all!
Live it up! Doug
Haha I can respect that... Clearly the guilt isn't overwhelming because it will never keep me from climbing back in that stand and shooting another one year after year. And when I tear into those backstrips I know that my decision to kill that deer was well worth it lol...
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Old 11-02-2010, 07:10 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Maddog10
Haha I can respect that... Clearly the guilt isn't overwhelming because it will never keep me from climbing back in that stand and shooting another one year after year. And when I tear into those backstrips I know that my decision to kill that deer was well worth it lol...
You will do well and I know you make your Dad proud! Best of luck to ya!
Live it up! Doug
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Old 11-02-2010, 07:38 PM
  #48  
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I appreciate it... Good luck to you as well.
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Old 11-02-2010, 11:41 PM
  #49  
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yeah i dont have to look away either.you will be so lucky to die so fast in this life, dont worry the doctors will keep u alive.since when was nature nice?sorry buds but we are a part of nature,and nature is cruel sometimes.we do our best but it happens.nothing is perfect.
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Old 11-02-2010, 11:53 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by Maddog10
Funny you say that secondchance. I killed my first deer with my dad when I was about 9 or 10 as well, and while my excitement kept me from getting that upset, the fact that I took it's life did hit me pretty hard, and that deer seemed to die instantly with no suffering at all. What was bad was that this doe was with a group of four other does and a fawn. After I shot the doe, the others ran about 20 yards and stopped. Three of them then turned around and walked straight back to the doe I shot, and were just looking at it and nudging it with their noses. I know that's all part of hunting, but that's a tough pill to swallow when you're a 10 year old kid that is an animal lover. Even as my dad taught me to field dress it, the other does never left. They stood about 60 yards away and just kept watching us. It wasn't until we began loading the deer on the four-wheeler that they trotted back into the woods. I asked my dad why the other deer didn't run away when I shot and I remember his response just like it was yesterday, "Because those other deer were her friends son."... I think that might have even made kswild feel a touch of sadness. haha
im sorry but this sounds like a bit of peta dressed in sheeps clothing,if your so deeply sadend then dont hunt,if not then get over it.
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