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Anybody have to look away as their deer dies?

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Anybody have to look away as their deer dies?

Old 11-01-2010, 06:11 PM
  #21  
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Sounds to me like everyone here is a sane humane being. This is one thing antis will never understand. Most of us are not blood thirsty animals. We can hunt but yet watch a doe walking through the snow and appreciate it's awsomeness.

I have watched many deer die before my eyes, and I have never once not felt sad. Would I stop hunting NEVER. I always say a quick prayer thanking God for giving me the opportunity to be in the woods and for the meat. Then I respect that animal by getting it cleaned quick and processed even if I have to work the next day and I'm up til 1 am.

We all have emotions and it's healthy to show them. Its when the emotions fade and are gone do we need to worry. May have been a little deep but it's the truth. Good Luck!
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Old 11-01-2010, 06:20 PM
  #22  
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That explained everything I've been trying to express, just in a much better way... haha
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Old 11-01-2010, 06:27 PM
  #23  
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You know the more I think about. I would be worried if I could blast a deer walk up and hear it wheeze and cough and feel nothing. If you happen to fall into this category scary Haloween's over.
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Old 11-01-2010, 07:07 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by bigcountry View Post
No, doubt, I feel a touch of sadness every time. God help the soul who doesn't. Its normal, and I believe its healthy. Those who don't, well keep your children away from them. Mentally they cannot be trusted and probably shouldn't be allowed hunting. Same as Jeffery Dahmer, these folks are akin to those who get off brutalizing dogs and cats.

Even pope and young, wrote in thier journals as they downed a lion, "we felt a touch of sadness as such a magnificent animal dies".
I have 3 kids, I'm not a serial killer, and yet when I shoot something I feel nothing but impatience. It's time that could be spent processing deer.. the more it thrashes, the more blood buildup in the meat. I don't feel sorrow, I am thankful for the food, but getting it from me and thrashing around for a second or drawing a harsh breath is much better than dying slowly of disease, Coyotes, or poachers... I do not feel remorse for the cow which graces my grill why would I for something which I consciously set out to kill...
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Old 11-01-2010, 07:31 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by kswild View Post
Are you kidding me? Are you saying that you cannot bare to fully experience the consequences of your actions? How can looking away be thought of as respect for the animal you just killed? As mohunter09 stated there might be a need for a second shot to end unneeded suffering. I think it is the hunters responsibility to make sure the animal is killed quickly, cleanly, with as little suffering as possible. I watch to make sure this is accomplished and I don't look away because of my respect for the animal. It is my duty to see it through to the end.
Live it up! Doug
I agree with this couldn't gave said it better myself.
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Old 11-01-2010, 09:19 PM
  #26  
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Well i understand where your coming from, But it just depends on the hunter really. Some hunters arent as sensitive as other, where watching the deer die wouldnt bother them. As for me, I will turn away, just because i rather not see the deer suffer. But we also need to realize that, thats hunting. We
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Old 11-01-2010, 09:23 PM
  #27  
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Well i understand where your coming from, But it just depends on the hunter really. Some hunters arent as sensitive as others, where watching the deer die wouldnt bother them. As for me, I will turn away, just because i rather not see the deer suffer. But i also have to realize is that thats part of hunting. It happens. Thats why everytime before i shoot i make sure its a good shot, I like to feel confident about my kills. But i definitely understand. Its human nature. And its hunting.
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Old 11-02-2010, 02:53 AM
  #28  
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Been a question since time began. Some can hunt; some can't. Perhaps we, in modern society, put too much emphasis on antlers, attracting too many for the wrong reasons, and not enough on what the deer is used for -a meal for an individual and family who has to survive on food.

I remember as a youth watching the chickens in a chicken coop. The owner would select a chicken. One second the chicken was alive; the next dead. It was Sunday dinner; the one meal the family was sure to have.

Many today, it seems, eat too much and gain too much weight. Maybe instinctively, the thought of survival, isn't as important as it once was. Some may not connect the animal to why they eat.
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Old 11-02-2010, 05:30 AM
  #29  
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About 10 years ago my buddy had just gotten back from the Marines and was out scouting area to hunt. He passed this old couple, Man embrassing his wife in front of their smashed up BMW. The man was in a suit and the lady was in a dress so he pulled over knowing that they were in trouble. My buddy looks over into the ditch and see's a fairly large doe hit and dragging herself in the woods with a broken back. My buddy has a heart for nature and can't stand things suffering. He went to the back of the truck and grabbed a screw driver and bat. He tried to put it out of its missery with the bat but she was squirming to much. While all this was going on the Man was yelling "Good god son, there is a lady present" he finally grabbed the screw driver and the doe by the neck and dislocated the head from the spine with one pop. He apologized to the man and lady and said it was necessary and walk back to his truck, called his step dad who was the sheriff and obtained a tag and took it home.
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Old 11-02-2010, 06:22 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by kswild View Post
Are you kidding me? Are you saying that you cannot bare to fully experience the consequences of your actions? How can looking away be thought of as respect for the animal you just killed? As mohunter09 stated there might be a need for a second shot to end unneeded suffering. I think it is the hunters responsibility to make sure the animal is killed quickly, cleanly, with as little suffering as possible. I watch to make sure this is accomplished and I don't look away because of my respect for the animal. It is my duty to see it through to the end.
Live it up! Doug
I definantly Agree With you. I wrote a research paper on why hunting is needed in today's society(got a 93 from a teacher who was not a fan for hunting, Said, "I opended her eyes") One of my points was that its a hunters reponsibility to take a clean ethical shot. Rather than a wolf or other predator take the animal down and start eating it while it is still alive. I also understand your point of the situation where you couldnt take another shot. Could you have gotten out of the stand?
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