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Tight Budget Deer Rifle

Old 11-18-2008, 04:22 PM
  #31  
 
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

terbzz idea ain't bad either. A muzzleloader would give you 11 extra days of gun deer hunting in Kentucky with the October weekend & December 9-day seasons.

Good muzzleloaders can be had for under $200. You'd have to get some of the required accessories as well (powder, bullets,/sabots/patches, primers, powder measure, etc). Some come in package deals that give you pretty much everything but the powder.

Not sure how familiar you are with muzzleloaders, but don't expect the kind of range you'd have with a good centerfire.You may have to experiment with bullets & powder charges to get good groups. Cleaning is much more important too, it's not hard even with my old flintlock & real black powder, but it's not something that can "wait 'till I have time" like it is with a centerfire. Unless you spring for the Savage 10ML & use smokeless powder, but that's probably out of your price range. One more thing, if you go the mz route, no matter what the advertisements or the guy at the gun store tells you, using the substitute powders (Pyrodex, Triple7, etc) will NOT prevent corrosion. Don't mean to scare you from muzzleloading, it's just that I've seen a BUNCH of perfectly good muzzleloading rifles ruined by friends of mine that didn't keep them clean. No matter the powder, if you don't clean it thoroughly & ASAP after shooting, the barrel will be a rusty, pitted sewer pipe bynext deer season.
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Old 11-18-2008, 05:18 PM
  #32  
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

I've always really liked the idea of those extra hunting days with a muzzleloader, but would I'll think I'll opt for a centerfire rifle for the time being. In the future that's definitely a cheaper option, but I'll wait and see what comes up in the muzzleloader category.
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Old 11-18-2008, 05:29 PM
  #33  
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

yeah muzzleloaders are cool, in a novel way, but the're annoying to clean, it takes time to reload, and when you think about it they're not very cost effective to shoot. you can get 24, 50 grain pellets for like $16. you shoot $1.30 away each time you shoot. then a box of 350 grain (at least) projectiles, there's another $15. and you spend that extra $1 a shot. and don't forget primers. anyway, while muzzleloaders are fun, they're expensive in the long run.
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Old 11-18-2008, 05:56 PM
  #34  
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

Sort of, but you typically fire them less.
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Old 11-18-2008, 06:32 PM
  #35  
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

I've owned New England Firearms (H&R), a Savage, a Winchester, aMarlin,Rugers, a Kimber, and several Remingtons. Considering your budget guidlines, I too would recommend the Savage in a .30-06. If that is a bit out of range, I would strongly recommend the New England Firearms (H&R) in .30-06. Even though its a single shot, they are very - very accurate, easy to maintain, malfunction free, and can be reloaded as fast as a bolt action if you have the extra rounds afixed to the butt of the gun. I bought one for my son three years ago and it is a great rifle.
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Old 11-18-2008, 06:36 PM
  #36  
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

ORIGINAL: Whootsinator

I've really been looking into the Savage 110. Conincidentally, that's the gun I borrowed today, in .243.It had a very smooth action and the owner had nothing but wonderful things to say about it. He got it new for around $250 at a shop.

I also just found out one of my neighbors has a connection to one of the better local shops. I think I'll ask him about it too.

mcraddock - I was thinking of doing that, but I'd definately want to inspect the rifle beforehand, and Mosins are hard to find in the area.
I say go with the Savage model 110
They are great rifles.
Thats the one that I rebarreled in GunSmithing School.
A Savage model 110, it went from a 243 to a 308.
I like the Savage rifle.
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Old 11-19-2008, 07:45 AM
  #37  
 
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

ORIGINAL: rustynobles

yeah muzzleloaders are cool, in a novel way, but the're annoying to clean, it takes time to reload, and when you think about it they're not very cost effective to shoot. you can get 24, 50 grain pellets for like $16. you shoot $1.30 away each time you shoot. then a box of 350 grain (at least) projectiles, there's another $15. and you spend that extra $1 a shot. and don't forget primers. anyway, while muzzleloaders are fun, they're expensive in the long run.
True enough, if you choose a modern inline. But with my T/C flintlock:

Hornady or Speer round ball: $0.13 per shot
pre-lubed 0.015" patch:$0.06 per shot
85 gr. Goex FFFg:$0.20 per shot
Missouri Longtrekker flint: $0.02 per shot

Total: $0.41 per shot

This assumes ~50 shots per flint, which is about what I'm averaging so far with Rich Pierce flints, at $1 per flint. Goex black powder came to ~$16.75 per pound last time I ordered, 7 lbs total. Would be a couple dollars less per lb if ordered by the full 25 lbs case. Balls could be practically free after investing $20 in a Lee mold by using scrap lead. Patching will be less after I run out of the store-bought, then I'll be using pillow ticking fabric lubed with a deer tallow & olive oil blend. And with some practice, a feller could knap his own flints [8D]

Not trying to be confrontational; your point is well taken... most folks are going to choose the modern route you referred to. Sure is a lot simpler than the old way. Just wanted to show that muzzleloading can be relatively cheap. Takes a twisted mind like mine to enjoy flintlocking



Well after that shameless attempt to promote a gun with an obsolete ignition system... I agree with the .30-06 Savage vote. You'll be happy with it.
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Old 11-19-2008, 01:52 PM
  #38  
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

I own a savage 111 .30-'06 that I purchased for budget reasons. A fantastic gun that will do just about everything I ask of it.

You mentioned Stevens 200. That would probably be a good buy, as it is the same rifle without the accutrigger that savage markets.
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Old 11-19-2008, 03:04 PM
  #39  
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

Yep, but I can find a 110 at the same price of a 200.
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Old 11-20-2008, 04:48 PM
  #40  
 
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Default RE: Tight Budget Deer Rifle

For yourhttp://wyomingtaxidermy.blogspot.com/ money Savage or Remington are pretty good buys and usally good shooters. http://wyomingtaxidermy.blogspot.com/
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