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I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

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I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

Old 09-11-2007, 02:10 PM
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BKE
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Default I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

the 45lb'er and not a 50. Picked up a recurve and although I'm still grinning each time I shoot I'm feeling a bit leery when I think about hunting with it next year. I knew there would be a world of differance between this and the cam1/2 but it's even more than I thought, I was expecting a bit more zip from the recurve. Any advice from those of youwho are experienced on a set up(arrows wgt/BH's) for whitetail will be appreciated.
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Old 09-11-2007, 02:29 PM
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

Im no expert, but about 10 grains per pound of arrow weight is good for bows in the 45 pound range. (45 pound bow = 450 grain arrow). A sharp 2 blade broadhead would probably be the best choice.45 pounds is plenty for deer, as long as you hit them in the right spot. So, as long as you are accurate with it, that bow will be fine. Also, for your first bow, 45 was probably the best choice, since there is no let off, that extra5 pounds is a pretty big jump.

This fall i'm using a 42 pound recurve with 500 grain arrows, because they flew the best. It is not fast as with a lighter arrow, but I don't doubt it will pass through a deer.

Good luck to ya.
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Old 09-11-2007, 04:58 PM
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

No, you didn't make a mistake. 45 lbs was an extremely popular draw weight for deer hunting, back before compounds. The key is to have a bow you can handle easily and shoot accurately. When you don't have a lot of KE, you fall back on momentum to maximize the KE your bow IS capable of producing. A heavier arrow with higher momentum will carry more energy downrange, and that's where you need it. 24/7 hunter is on the right track with his 500 gn arrows.

If you use carbon arrows, you can get arrow weight up by using brass inserts and a hefty 2-blade cut on contact broadhead. It'll also bump FOC up around 15-20% or more. High FOC arrows are showing improved penetration on game in Dr. Ashby's arrow lethality studies.
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Old 09-11-2007, 07:18 PM
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

Not that Iam any expert, but I am using a #50 longbow this year that is quite slow, but I know it's still goingto lay a thump on a deer with my 515 gr arrows. Yea it's weird having the arrow go so slow, but it'll get the job done.
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Old 09-12-2007, 06:25 AM
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

BKE,

You did not make a mistake. Your arrows should be in the 400 to 450 grain range. A sharp 2 bladed 125 grain head. I prefer the Ace standard.

If new to this side of archery, remember the native americans successfuly harvested large game animals with 40 lb self bows and crooked arrows and knapped stone heads. The best thing for you to do is disreguard all the compound hype about exagerated arrow speed.

A well placed arrow from that bow will pass through a deer. At 12 yards afriend of mine had a pass through on a 900 pound bull buffalo last year with a 55 pound self bow and a 700 grain multifloral rose shaft tiped with a knapped obsideon head tied on with deer back sinew and sinew tied turkey feathers. It dropped 70 yards from where it was hit.

Enjoy every minute of being a traditional hunter.
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Old 09-12-2007, 07:10 AM
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

When you say hunting, I'm assuming you mean whitetail. And no, you made a good decision, not a bad one, especially for your first bow.
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Old 09-12-2007, 08:01 AM
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BKE
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

Thanks all for the replies/info/advice.
In responce to everyone (in no specific order):

As for next years hunting I do indeed intend to use it for whitetail.

When deciding on the 45 I did try a 50 and a 55 and could easily feel the differance the jump in 5lb. increments made.I did take"no let off" and"being in my fifties with bad shoulders, yet still wanting to shoot/hunt for many more years" into account.

From your advice I see my bow shop fixed me up properly (I don't question him, he's been at it for many, many years). He recommended the Carbon express "heritage". If I read the charts right I have: arrow @11gr per in. (28in), nock @ 8.7 andinsert @ 11, FP @ 150 which I figure to be 488.7.

So I'm in the same ballpark with what everyone recommends and that is without the 5in. feathers. Anyone have an approx. wgt. on those?

Again, thanks all
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Old 09-12-2007, 02:36 PM
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

It'll depend on the shape, but figure about 4 grains each, not including the glue.
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Old 09-16-2007, 12:55 PM
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

i shoot a 45lber and just took a nice merino ram which isa hard animal to kill. he went down in 60 yards and you can kill any deer type animal and even larger with the right set up and broadheads. i will be hunting deer and would hunt elk but would have to get close to make the right shot. also you don't want to buy a bow that causes you to overwork your muscles. it can cause bad shooting skills and could ruin a shot you are taking on an animal
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Old 09-18-2007, 06:56 PM
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Default RE: I'm hoping I didn't make a mistake buying..

No, you didn't make a mistake. 45 lbs was an extremely popular draw weight for deer hunting, back before compounds. The key is to have a bow you can handle easily and shoot accurately. When you don't have a lot of KE, you fall back on momentum to maximize the KE your bow IS capable of producing. A heavier arrow with higher momentum will carry more energy downrange, and that's where you need it. 24/7 hunter is on the right track with his 500 gn arrows.
You're right Arther P. But the other thing, actually more than 1, that a recurve shooter needs to keep in mind is the maximum hold time when at full draw and arrow drop down range with heavier arrows that are without BH's.

The archer should be able to line up his/her shot within a time span of 5-8 seconds. Having a bow that can be easily drawn back and controlled with a modicum of muscle force is the key.

The other thing that the archer needs to keep in mind while shooting a recurve is the weight of the arrow & BH together. A 45# bow should be able to fire an arrow of 450gns but this arrow may drop much faster than an arrow which is say 350Gns. Recurve shooters need to compensate for the difference in weight when shooting long yardage shots. An that is too heavy for the bow will almost always fly with a nose down attitude. Other than that, I say have fun.


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