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finding the correct arrow spine strength at a decent price

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finding the correct arrow spine strength at a decent price

Old 09-06-2020, 03:47 PM
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Default finding the correct arrow spine strength at a decent price

I'm having an issue finding the correct replacement arrows at anything like a decent price.
can anyone point out a decent place to buy new arrows or arrow shafts
I generally shoot a 31" length draw arrow on an 87 lb compound bow,
thus I want a spine strength in the 150-200 range.
Ive used the same 18 arrows for 3 decades and can't remember where I purchased them
I recently seem to have misplaced all but 5,
I am 100% certain the prices Im currently quoted are absurd, at well over $240 for 18 new bare carbon shafts


Last edited by hardcastonly; 09-06-2020 at 04:17 PM.
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Old 09-07-2020, 05:07 AM
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Think you've got another thirty years of pulling an 80lbs bow? If so that's only $8 per year. I think you'll be alright.

-Jake
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Old 09-07-2020, 05:27 AM
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I would also wonder Why you feel a need to shoot such a high LB bow? as its surely not needed to do so, archery is more about a sharp head and then shot placement .
Than needing the most power, countless extremely larger dangerous animals have been killed with bows of almost HALF the weight your shooting!
why beat yourself up and add costs to finding right arrows and such??
just food for thought NO bash here, we can all use what ever we like Dior sure, , and everyone else doesn't need to like or understand it , I agree on this
but , just s[-offering a suggestion to maybe try a lower LB draw weight and make things easier on you!

and I would also IF ME< be a little worried about shooting them same shafts over and over at that weight for this long, ALL things loose strength over time!, from wear and tear, impacts and friction, and even V wear!

at 87 lbs, that's a LOT of force and if anything goes wrong, things can go BAD real fast!
just sating! NO bash, just offering food for thought here!

Last edited by mrbb; 09-07-2020 at 05:29 AM.
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Old 09-07-2020, 05:59 AM
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pulling that bow back,and shooting it in my back yard on a regular basis,
its one of my main ways I use to exercise and stay semi physically fit.
and no I doubt I have even 10 more years as the knees and back are not all that happy with back-packing a heavy pack in steep country
for a 73 year old geezer Im doing reasonably well , but reality and age gets to us all eventually.
now Ive gotten used to the bow and Id kinda miss the challenge and flat trajectory swapping to something different.
and yeah I have a 65 lb bow thats just as accurate
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Old 09-07-2020, 06:12 AM
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I can relate
but honestly a lighter arrow and lower LB draw, as to shooting a heavier arrow and higher LB draw, I doubt there is any difference in trajectory , and possibly even Gain some!
so i think any worries about a arrow's flight to have more drop is not something to worry about at all
and if you have either pin's for each range or an adjustable sight, the difference is nothing to worry about, you are just aiming with correct distance/pin,
and ??
beating up a body won;t make it last longer, but using a lower more forgiving bow, MIGHT actually extend your time using it IMO!
I am also guessing the bow your using is also rather older too(could be wrong)
so just going to a newer bow, might get you more let off, less vibration and even a much smoother draw, making it easier on your body!(shoulders , elbows,wrist, back and so on)

I shot a bow at 78 lbs for decades then dropped to a lower weight of about 67, and it was lot easier being more accurate for me and kept me shooting it longer(have many back and other issue's)
had I not dropped to a lower draw and more left off, I wouldn;t have lasted as long as I did,

like Is aid, some times we have to adapt to stay at things and doing so sooner than later might even extends things,. and the whole time be easier on us!
as again arrows will be easier to find, more options and just a more forgiving set up !
worth thinking about
and WHO doesn't like adding new toys to play with, be them guns, bows, boats, atv's or?? what ever makes you happy! some times new toys also help keep us Young ,. or help forget about other things (so long as the budget allows)


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Old 09-07-2020, 06:14 AM
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Your cost for bare shafts is pretty close to what I see around here. Pulling that weight at 70 years old is impressive and I don't blame you for trying to hang onto your youth.

I have no desire to pull a bow that heavy. If you want to continue shooting that and the cost is prohibitive, do you need 30 shafts? Would 10 work? 5?

Just a thought. Add some extra walking into your "workout" by retrieving your arrows more often.

-Jake
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Old 09-07-2020, 03:48 PM
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Hardcast I don't know the reason for you wanting to be using that heavy a bow and I'm not one to judge. In my younger years I shot bows with draw weight of 125 allbeit with some difficulty. But I could do it. One year, and one year only I hunted with a 80# draw weight. I had a big whitetail doe come up and stand broadside at 23 yards. I placed my pin behind her shoulder and released. I watched her spin and run 40 yards and pile up. The 125 gr Muzzy did its job. When I got down I went to retrieve my arrow and after it had passed completely through that doe the muzzy drove completely through a 2" oak sapling sticking out about 3" on the other side! Needless to say there was no retrieving that arrow without cutting down the tree.
Point I'm trying to make is that this day and age, unless you're hunting cape buffalo or elephant there simply isn't a need for this kind of weight. And speaking of buffalo, Using a 63# draw, 300 spine arrows @ 28" with 100 gr Magnus Stinger BHs I shot 2 mature bison. One at 35 yards and the other at 44 yards and had complete pass throughs on both.
So if I were to give you advice I would tell you to drop down your weight and save your back and shoulders. Any deer or black bear shot with a 60# bow (even less) will be just as dead in the same amount of time with the same shot placement.And I be you would even be a better shot?!
But if you need to I saw a dozen bare carbon shafts on Ebay for $114.

Last edited by bronko22000; 09-07-2020 at 03:51 PM.
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Old 09-08-2020, 05:45 AM
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you may have a point, and yes the broad heads used may be the key here,
but I totally trust that bow as, I've shot and had a few complete pass throughs on elk,
and that impressed me!.
especially after a buddy with a 55 lb draw bow hit a cow elk in the ribs ,
and it ran almost 200 yards before falling with a decent lung hit,
where the arrow only went deep enough to destroy one lung.
and since he is one of the guys I regularly hunt with,
I also noticed I get instant effortless pass throughs on deer and he rarely does,
and Florida deer around my area, rarely exceed 120 lbs
now to be fair, I hone my broadheads to a shaving sharp edge
and I doubt my friend does anything but install and shoot his broadheads
he and I both use a broad head that looks rather similar too, but longer than this broadhead picture ,
and no I don,t remember the name but they are 150 grain weight.

Last edited by hardcastonly; 09-08-2020 at 01:37 PM.
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Old 09-09-2020, 05:33 AM
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Wow Hardcast a heavy arrow AND a heavy broadhead! You could sink that combo all the way into an elephant!. And I don't think I'm exaggerating. I don't know what bow you're shooting but it sounds like its an older one. But I sure know what you mean about having confidence in a bow. I had a Martin Cheetah that I just loved and could shoot the gnats off a fly's butt without breaking the skin (that MIGHT be an exaggeration). For some reason a limb cracked on it. And even though Martin honored their warranty and sent me a new bow it wasn't another Cheetah because they had changed their line. It was one step up but it just didn't feel the same.
Today's bows however develop more speed all other things being equal so you could shoot a lighter poundage and lighter arrow and still get the same KE. You will obviously loose some momentum but I don't think a deer or elk will know the difference.
BTW I believe the broadhead you might be using is called a "Snuffer".
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