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New To Bowhunting: Need advice

Old 04-15-2014, 08:41 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Default New To Bowhunting: Need advice

Hey guys!
I'm looking to pick up a compound bow to practice through the summer/winter and hopefully hunt with if I get drawn next year.

First of all, I'd love to get your opinions on bow measurements.
I'm 18, 6'1 and weigh 155lb. Everything I have read says around 28.5-29" draw length and about 55-60 weight. I plan to use it for elk and deer mostly, as I live in northern NM. What are your thoughts??

Second, I haven't shot a bow in quite a long time. I used to shoot light weight recurve and compound bows when I was younger. They were only #20-40 draw weight, if that.
So, would 60+ be too much for someone who hasn't touched a real bow in quite a while?


And lastly, what bow set up would you recommend?
My price range is around 900 dollars max for bow, sight, quiver.. ect.

A few packages I have been looking at are:

http://www.huntersfriend.com/2014_PS...e_lite_bow.htm

http://www.huntersfriend.com/2013_Be...mpound_bow.htm


http://www.huntersfriend.com/2013_Bo...mpound_bow.htm

I'm definitely open to any and all suggestions.
thanks in advance, guys!

Last edited by dyjack; 04-15-2014 at 09:27 PM.
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Old 04-16-2014, 06:54 AM
  #2  
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dy - I believe your draw length at 28 - 29" would be a bit short for you. More like 30". But a pro shop would be able to help you out with that to be sure. (I'm 5'8" and shoot 28" and I am not over extended).
As for draw weight you can get a compound with at draw range of 45 - 60 lb so you can start at the lower DW and work your way up as your muscles develop. Changing DW is as easy as turning an allen screw on each limb equal amounts.
I sent you a pm for you to reply.
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Old 04-16-2014, 07:39 AM
  #3  
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I see you're looking at Hunter's Friend. Have you looked at their bow sizing guide and their compound bow selection guide (links are in the drop down menus). Lots of good info there. I agree with Bronko, that does sound a bit short. A pro shop would be the best option, but when I bought last (I had not bow hunted for quite a while before I got back into it about 8 years ago), I used the arm span method described on Hunter's Friend.
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Old 04-16-2014, 08:22 AM
  #4  
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The general rule of thumb for draw length based on height is this:

(height in inches)/(2.5) = draw length.

BUT, that does assume your height is equal to your wingspan. The formula REALLY depends upon your wingspan.

So if your wingspan = your height...

6'1" = 73". 73" / 2.5 = 29.2". So I'd look at a 29-29.5" draw length.

Truth be told, height gets me closer than wingspan normally. For example, I'm 5'10" with a 6'0" wingspan. But, all of my extra wingspan is in my shoulders, not my arms. I still shoot 28.5" and 28.25" bows, which is what my HEIGHT dictates, not 29" that my wingspan dictates.

I've worked off and on as a bowtech in different shops over the last 10yrs, and set up a couple dozen bows for buddies and family in the meantime, the "2.5" number is usually within half an inch - which I think is mostly due to differences in release type and personal preference more than actual dimensional error. I'd really question why they recommend something different if a shop has you shooting a very different length than the 2.5 number gives you.

The good news is that you don't really have to worry about buying a specific bow for that draw length - all modern compounds are adjustable, usually from 26-30" or some up to 32".

Personally, I'd recommend you buy a 70lb bow, then set the draw weight at 60lbs. At 155 and 6'1", you're skinny, but you have leverage on your side. Most guys can handle 60lbs very comfortably, and having a 60-70lb bow will give you an option to go up as your technique improves.

Oooh, I forgot... The BOWS!!! I'm a big Bowtech fan, and the Assassin is a great bow.

Last edited by Nomercy448; 04-16-2014 at 08:28 AM.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:06 AM
  #5  
Spike
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awesome info guys! The only shops I know of near me are Big 5 sporting goods, dicks sporting goods, and an archery shop that's three hours away. I'll get a buddy to measure my wingspan asap!
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:18 AM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by Nomercy448 View Post
Truth be told, height gets me closer than wingspan normally.

The good news is that you don't really have to worry about buying a specific bow for that draw length - all modern compounds are adjustable, usually from 26-30" or some up to 32".

Personally, I'd recommend you buy a 70lb bow, then set the draw weight at 60lbs. At 155 and 6'1", you're skinny, but you have leverage on your side. Most guys can handle 60lbs very comfortably, and having a 60-70lb bow will give you an option to go up as your technique improves.

Oooh, I forgot... The BOWS!!! I'm a big Bowtech fan, and the Assassin is a great bow.
I'm not entirely sure if my shoulders account for much of my wingspan or not. As soon as I find a tape measure I'll figure it out.

So, starting at 50# would be a good bet. Is the bow tech assassin easy to adjust draw weight/length on? And have you ever shot it?

Sorry for all the questions. I just want to get it all right the first time lol
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Old 05-26-2014, 08:14 AM
  #7  
BTM
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CAN YOU DETERMINE YOUR DRAW LENGTH BY MEASURING YOUR WINGSPAN?
This subject appears quite often on archery websites. It starts with a new archer asking how to determine his draw length. Then someone responds by providing a “magic formula” based on one’s wing span: “Stand next to wall, stretch out your arms, and have someone measure the distance between your finger tips. Subtract X, divide by Y, then order your bow.”
I'd never order a bow based on a generic physiological formula. That’ll only get you into the ballpark. As an example, a buddy's wingspan is 2" longer than mine, but he shoots best with a DL 1" shorter than me. Both of us have good form. Arm length and shoulder width might have something to do with it.
Something else I hardly ever see in these "How do I measure my DL?" threads is a discussion of the type of release you use. Some releases (like the Winn glove) hold the string much closer to your hand, while others have a long body with the trigger way behind the jaws, which gives you less power stroke.
General rules I read in an article by Bernie Pellerite: Your shooting eye should be directly above your navel, and your shirt buttons should be in a vertical line.
Grip method (low wrist, high wrist, etc.), stance, use (and length) of D-loop, comfortable & repeatable anchor point, etc., also enter into the equation.
I'd recommend getting an expert coach to observe you shoot. Then experiment extensively to see what works best for you. If your primary emphasis is hunting, better to use a DL a little short than a little too long. This will help you shoot more consistently from field positions and will reduce the chance of the string slapping your forearm.
At the 2007 SCI show I asked Bowhunter magazine’s technical editor how many archers he sees with a DL that’s too long. His answer: “About 50%.” An archery shop owner told me he sees even more than that.
Final tip: Buy a bow with some adjustment range rather than one that’s draw length specific. And never blindly trust the manufacturer’s label! The DL of most bows I’ve purchased have been longer than the label indicated. For example, both of my supposedly 31” Mathews bows were almost 32”. This really affected my form, accuracy, and consistency until someone mentioned that I was stretched out and leaning back at full draw. (That was 13-14 years ago; maybe Mathews has fixed that by now.)
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Old 06-20-2014, 10:57 AM
  #8  
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I just saw an ad for a Bowtech bow that was adjustable to 31" draw, and from like 10 - 60 lbs, with a 310 fps rating. Other companies have similar bows. Something like that would allow you to shoot and adjust as you develop strength and form. you'd need to buy arrows as you go, but you'll do that anyway.
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Old 07-09-2014, 09:38 PM
  #9  
Typical Buck
 
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yea at 6'1" you are probably more like a 30" as for a good bow try the Winchester vaquero around 599 for bare bow then leaves you enough for some good accessories.
the 2014 martin eclypse is nice too looks good not as dead in the hand as the Winchester but about 100 less
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Old 07-10-2014, 07:53 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by dyjack View Post
Is the bow tech assassin easy to adjust draw weight/length on? And have you ever shot it?
I know this is reaching back a few months, but to answer the question that was asked...

Yes and no. Yes, the bowtech assassin is as easy to adjust draw weight and length as any bow of its era. THAT SAID, you likely can't adjust the draw length yourself, as the Assassin requires a bow press. Bowtech is making a move to go to all "non-press" bows, so the new generation, as in the models released in the last 2-3yrs, are adjustable by the shooter without a press.

Draw WEIGHT is a simple task of turning an allen wrench - just don't go too low and back the bolts out too far.

Yes, I've shot, set up, and tuned several Assassins, and have to say I'm a fan of the Assassin as a hunter's bow (budget friendly, but non-compromising in specs). It's not as aggressive as Bowtechs top end bows, so it's not as fast, but it's also a LOT nicer to draw (i.e. the Insanity CPX and the Destroyer feel like they hit max draw weight immediately within the first 1/2" of draw). I always tend to sing high praises of the Assassin and it's single cam cousin, the Diamond Outlaw (made by bowtech), for beginners and budget friendly hunting bows.
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