HuntingNet.com Forums

HuntingNet.com Forums (https://www.huntingnet.com/forum/)
-   Technical (https://www.huntingnet.com/forum/technical-20/)
-   -   What do you technical pros think? (https://www.huntingnet.com/forum/technical/331787-what-do-you-technical-pros-think.html)

travis_ranger2000 10-13-2010 10:13 AM

What do you technical pros think?
 
I am working on a new project, as for the Dual Laser bow tuners are out. This project is patent pending as well. Saying that, I'm working on a hand held release mechanism that hooks on your string and rolls on a roller, as you draw your bow it will slide up or down to find your exact nocking point! After finding your exact nocking point it will then clamp a nocking ring there and then you can put your loop on around it. Whats your thoughts? I'm hoping this will be on the market in 6 months or so. Thanks, Travis.

YooperMike 10-13-2010 11:00 AM

I'm FAR from a technical pro, but maybe i'm not visualizing this correctly: How will the device work while the bow is being drawn. Even if there are no nock rings on the string, a release will slide to the point of least resistance in the "triangle" created between string and riser. In my mind, wouldn't you have to draw the bow by some other means other than using a release or anything else on the string, or draw the bow and somehow have it remain at full draw with nothing on the string for your device to actually find the precise nocking point?

travis_ranger2000 10-13-2010 11:10 AM

True Nock
 

Originally Posted by YooperMike (Post 3701568)
I'm FAR from a technical pro, but maybe i'm not visualizing this correctly: How will the device work while the bow is being drawn. Even if there are no nock rings on the string, a release will slide to the point of least resistance in the "triangle" created between string and riser. In my mind, wouldn't you have to draw the bow by some other means other than using a release or anything else on the string, or draw the bow and somehow have it remain at full draw with nothing on the string for your device to actually find the precise nocking point?

Maybe I didn't explain it well enough, before anything is on your string you will draw your bow with the True Nock finder which rolls up or down your string to find the perfect V, then squeezing your trigger will clamp a small nocking ring around your string, allowing you to apply your Loop top and bottom of your ring, then you take the ring off and your set.

YooperMike 10-13-2010 11:19 AM

Ahh, ok. I didn't realize you drew the bow with your nocking tool. Not trying to be a smart-a$$ here, but how would this be different than clipping a release on there and marking the string? I understand that it's one-stop shopping if you are going to use nock rings, but for someone like me that doesn't use them, i'd rather just mark the string and tie a loop and not have to mess with removing the nock rings.

travis_ranger2000 10-13-2010 11:31 AM


Originally Posted by YooperMike (Post 3701583)
Ahh, ok. I didn't realize you drew the bow with your nocking tool. Not trying to be a smart-a$$ here, but how would this be different than clipping a release on there and marking the string? I understand that it's one-stop shopping if you are going to use nock rings, but for someone like me that doesn't use them, i'd rather just mark the string and tie a loop and not have to mess with removing the nock rings.

Using the roller is more exact, and it clipping on a nocking ring will allow 1 person to do this job, it would be really hard to mark it at full draw without another person.

travis_ranger2000 10-13-2010 11:36 AM

My products are not to take away from any pro shops, as for I have alot of respect for the owner of my home town bow shop which is 40 mins away. My products are to allow any archer to set up his/her bow at home, and to be successful at it.

bigbulls 10-13-2010 01:12 PM

Why would you need to draw the bow to mark where you are going to install a loop? There is absolutely no reason to at all. If you tie a loop at the true center, which is what this will do if I am underastanding correctly, of the string at full draw you are going to tie it about 2 inches too low.

Have you ever tried to draw a bow with out any nocks on the string? The release will slip straight to the cam before the string gets 8" back.

I honestly think you are making setting a bow up far more dificult that it should or needs to be.

Set you rest so that your arrow crosses the berger button hole. Slide the nock und of the arrow so that it is 1/16th of an inch nock high. Mark the string with a sharpie above and below the nock and tie a loop.

I understand that you are coming up with new ways to do things and inventing new products but you are honestly turning a simple 5 minute job into a chore.

travis_ranger2000 10-13-2010 01:59 PM


Originally Posted by bigbulls (Post 3701651)
Why would you need to draw the bow to mark where you are going to install a loop? There is absolutely no reason to at all. If you tie a loop at the true center, which is what this will do if I am underastanding correctly, of the string at full draw you are going to tie it about 2 inches too low.

Have you ever tried to draw a bow with out any nocks on the string? The release will slip straight to the cam before the string gets 8" back.

I honestly think you are making setting a bow up far more dificult that it should or needs to be.

Set you rest so that your arrow crosses the berger button hole. Slide the nock und of the arrow so that it is 1/16th of an inch nock high. Mark the string with a sharpie above and below the nock and tie a loop.

I understand that you are coming up with new ways to do things and inventing new products but you are honestly turning a simple 5 minute job into a chore.

Bigbulls, I like how you stand by your word. 5 min job into a chore? Watch my video of tuning in a Mathews switchback, I can set your nocking point off the center of plunger hole, laser in your arrow both ways, and set your sights from left to right all in 5 mins, so where are you coming up with a chore? Time is valuable to some people!

YooperMike 10-13-2010 02:01 PM


Originally Posted by bigbulls (Post 3701651)
Why would you need to draw the bow to mark where you are going to install a loop? There is absolutely no reason to at all. If you tie a loop at the true center, which is what this will do if I am underastanding correctly, of the string at full draw you are going to tie it about 2 inches too low.

Have you ever tried to draw a bow with out any nocks on the string? The release will slip straight to the cam before the string gets 8" back.

I honestly think you are making setting a bow up far more dificult that it should or needs to be.

Set you rest so that your arrow crosses the berger button hole. Slide the nock und of the arrow so that it is 1/16th of an inch nock high. Mark the string with a sharpie above and below the nock and tie a loop.

I understand that you are coming up with new ways to do things and inventing new products but you are honestly turning a simple 5 minute job into a chore.

bigbulls, why is that (red text above). Like I said, i'm not a techie, but my pea-brain can't wrap around why the nock is low when centered at full draw. I've always tied my loops on the same way you described, which is likely why I don't understand the 2" low.

travis_ranger2000 10-13-2010 02:18 PM


Originally Posted by YooperMike (Post 3701691)
bigbulls, why is that (red text above). Like I said, i'm not a techie, but my pea-brain can't wrap around why the nock is low when centered at full draw. I've always tied my loops on the same way you described, which is likely why I don't understand the 2" low.

TY YOOPERMIKE! He is probably talking about a cam and a half bow? But anyhow,, arrow should be launched from equal amounts of force from top and bottom. Even on a cam and a half bow the top wheel accounts for the differences and spins faster to accomodate the differences, but is smoother.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:36 PM.


Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.